Immigration: More Foreign Nurses Needed? - page 2

immigration: more foreign nurses needed? full article at business week... Read More

  1. by   nicurn001
    I always understood that the USA has a capitalist economy where supply and demand led to market forces setting the value for goods and services , why is it that this doesn't appear to apply to nursing ?.If there is a shortage of CEO's we continue to raise their salaries to attract , the high caliber of people who helped create our present economy !.
    We have area's of the country that have a shortage of nurses , rather than try to attract nurses to the area with the benefits necessary , employers would rather seek experienced nurses from countries ,exporting our nursing shortage to them .
    If you make it attractive for nurses to come to you , they will come .
  2. by   nicurn001
    PLEASE , PLEASE , PLEASE do not turn this thread into a futile debate on whether foreign nurses are qualified , or due to whatever percieved challenge they present (cultural/ languaue differences ).
    All nurses wherever they are from have to meet the state BON requirements as to course content and have to pass the NCLEX exam . If you meet the requirements you are entitled to call yourself a nurse and seek employment as a nurse .
  3. by   Akinna
    Quote from casper1
    With unemployment soon to reach 10% many Americans are looking for steady jobs with good pay and benefits. Funds should be utilized to expand educational opportunities for future potential nurses. I work with nurses who have chosen nursing as a second career, former policemen, teachers, construction workers, displaced factory workers, the pool of potential recruits to the profession is endless. World Healthcare organizations have warned against American recruitment of skilled foreign Health care workers. Many of these workers are recruited from poor countries who also have a inadequate supply of trained professional.
    I would like to bring above article to your attention, and if someone could research nurses websites concerning the huge difficulties to find a nursing job for fresh graduates.
    The article in newsweek gives the interpretation that in this country we are not willing to do nursing job.
    This is far from the truth.
    Most new grad nurses beg for a job, and many months goes by without any result.
    The problem is two fold, the first year of RN must work in pair with another RN. This is expensive for the hospitals, so they deeply cut back on their new grad positions.
    But yes, Americans are ready and willing to do the job, if only they would have a place to begin.
  4. by   Akinna
    http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/...temp_top+story

    Quote from casper1
    With unemployment soon to reach 10% many Americans are looking for steady jobs with good pay and benefits. Funds should be utilized to expand educational opportunities for future potential nurses. I work with nurses who have chosen nursing as a second career, former policemen, teachers, construction workers, displaced factory workers, the pool of potential recruits to the profession is endless. World Healthcare organizations have warned against American recruitment of skilled foreign Health care workers. Many of these workers are recruited from poor countries who also have a inadequate supply of trained professional.
    anyone commented on Newsweek pages to voice nursing staff problem?
    The new grads have little chance to get trained soon after graduation.
  5. by   DolceVita
    I have just checked the graduate employment reports for the three major schools in my area, including mine, and for 2008 the lowest percent employment was 98.1%. I will be very interested to see what 2009 will look like. By the way, for LPNs it was only 83%.

    What I am glad about is that the article was specific in the area where it says there is a nursing shortage -- long term care.

    I think that shipping in nurses, in large numbers, from other countries is a bad idea. This is nothing to do with their language or any other ability. It removes the incentive for us to come up with an organic solution.
  6. by   lee1
    The issue of importing "foreign nurses" to fill vacancy shortages has been going on for more than 40 years. Yes, in some sense it is all about the money and in another sense it is about bringing in nurses who do NOT question their working conditions, etc. etc. They don't rock the boat and the managers who hire them love the fact that they do their work, don't ask too many questions, do what they are told. How would you like to work with a whole group of Nurses who because of their cultural heritage do NOT ask questions, rock the boat, empower themselves or their peers ????
    On the other hand many are very good nurses, but becoming part of the Americanized culture (primarily women) takes many years to develop the trust/ empowerment that comes with being raised "American"
    I agree that the problem of having too many qualified applicants who are "American", born here, whatever culture they come from or came from legally is the BIG issue. More professors, paid decent, competitive salaries, benefits is what we need NOW. At least Obama has that right.
  7. by   nicurn001
    lee1 , it is true that foreign nurses are less likely to rock the boat ,it may also be correct that some may do this due to cultural differences , but the vast majority of foreign nurses keep their heads down because their visa specifies their place of work . If the foreign nurse loses their job for whatever reason , they lose their visa and are liable for deportation if they remain here without a visa , that is a great incentive to not rock the boat .
  8. by   blue note
    Quote from Akinna
    anyone commented on Newsweek pages to voice nursing staff problem?
    Please note that it was from Business Week, not Newsweek.
  9. by   EmilyLucille523
    Quote from EmilyLucille523
    Then give us new grads a chance to get the experience needed in that area first. We are not dumb, we can figure it out.
    Quote from nicurn001
    PLEASE , PLEASE , PLEASE do not turn this thread into a futile debate on whether foreign nurses are qualified , or due to whatever percieved challenge they present (cultural/ languaue differences ).
    All nurses wherever they are from have to meet the state BON requirements as to course content and have to pass the NCLEX exam . If you meet the requirements you are entitled to call yourself a nurse and seek employment as a nurse .
    Again, I mean no offense to anyone. However, I ask myself all the time how are we going to become "Experienced Nurses" if an employer does not give us that needed experience in the first place and now we have to compete with our own nurses coming back in the workforce along with foreigners? Does anyone else understand me? Or am I crazy?!? (Don't answer that last part!:wink2
  10. by   SouthernComfort31
    No to importing foreign nurses. There are nurses here, experienced or new grads, that cannot get jobs.
    There are other ways rural areas can recruit homeland nurses:
    - offer incentives to buy houses and settle in the area (like the teaching profession)
    - pay off loans/utilize government programs that pay off school loans for underserved areas...and help new grads find that information (the program is hard to navigate individually)
    - commit to creating healthy work environments that nurses will leave urban areas and move to rural areas

    Enough with the stop-gap measures; think long term! Expand educational opportunities for American citizens that want to get into nursing. Don't drain poorer, underdeveloped countries of their nurses who are also desperate for talented and educated nursing professionals.
  11. by   javaline
    I total feel ya Emily. I see page after page of nursing positions daily but no hospital is willing to give a new grad a chance. Come on now. As they put their adds in week after week some new grad could be getting trained. Hello, why is this so hard to understand. I know it takes time and money to train a new grad but bringing in a traveler or someone from registry day after day has to be more expensive. I just don't get it.
  12. by   AZ_LPN_8_26_13
    Quote from EmilyLucille523
    Then give us new grads a chance to get the experience needed in that area first. We are not dumb, we can figure it out.
    Amen to that.... We are not dumb. We are not lazy. We can do this. We are Americans. I am offended by the very idea that importing foreign nurses is considered first before education and training of new nurses. What? It will take a while? Well, all that means is we better get going with this and put those brand new nurses to work right now, the sooner the better. And while we're at it, ramp up the education capacity too......
  13. by   Ginger's Mom
    Quote from PCstudent2009
    Amen to that.... We are not dumb. We are not lazy. We can do this. We are Americans. I am offended by the very idea that importing foreign nurses is considered first before education and training of new nurses. What? It will take a while? Well, all that means is we better get going with this and put those brand new nurses to work right now, the sooner the better. And while we're at it, ramp up the education capacity too......

    It costs $10K-$30K to import a foreign nurse. if the hospitals that import nurses, gave this money toward a new graduate in form of a deposit on a home I bet many nurses would move.

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