Hospitals cut turnover with continuing education

  1. People take jobs because they're drawn to the organization, but they leave jobs because they don't like their supervisor.

    It's an often-quoted adage in human resources circles. Yet experts warn against laying blame for a failed employer-employee relationship solely at the supervisor's feet. It's just as likely, they say, that the organization is at fault.

    "I have no doubt that we've got really good people as managers in healthcare, but they're underprepared," says Gail Wolf, R.N., chief nursing officer for the 20-hospital University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh. "My background is clinical. I would never send a nurse out to take care of a patient without making sure they have all the skills they need-but we do that every day with our managers."

    Wolf is the chief proponent and executive in charge of the system's multitiered management-training program, which is aimed at everyone from potential managers to up-and-coming senior executives. Launched five years ago for the purpose of developing new senior or "level three" executives, the program was expanded a year ago in partnership with Development Dimensions International Inc., a Bridgeville, Pa.-based human resources consulting firm, to address training needs across all levels of the organization.

    After a one-week intensive classroom session, level-one and level-two participants-emerging leaders and frontline managers selected by UPMC-are assigned a mentor and required to complete a six-month project for the organization. Level-three participants undergo a two-week intensive training program and a yearlong project and mentorship. The projects are designed to "stretch" participants' skills, says Wolf. For example, as a current manager, a level-two participant already comfortable working within his or her department would be assigned a hospital-wide project. Similarly, a level-three participant would work on a project that spans the UPMC system.

    Full Story: http://www.healthleaders.com/news/fe...ontentid=65742
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    5 Comments

  3. by   magicman
    Clipped for brevity
    Quote from brian

    says Gail Wolf, R.N., chief nursing officer for the 20-hospital University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pittsburgh. "My background is clinical. I would never send a nurse out to take care of a patient without making sure they have all the skills they need-but we do that every day with our managers."
    I'm hoping the bed number is a BIG typo! UPMC has more than 20 beds in their E.D. alone!
  4. by   sjt9721
    Read it again...it says 20-hospital...

  5. by   magicman
    Quote from sjt9721
    Read it again...it says 20-hospital...

    I can READ quite well. My point is that the article MISPRiNTED the amount of beds.
    Look at this link and you tell ME if they only have 20 beds.

    http://www.upmc.com/Hospitals.htm
  6. by   directcare4me
    I read the article from the posted link. I still only saw "20-hospital". Did I miss the number of beds?
  7. by   Judee Smudee
    Gail Wolfe is a good exec or at least she has good intentions. She is right that her middle level managment people leave something to be desired. While she struggles to implement programs that promote retention, her middle level managment people abuse and exploit and drive good staff out of the system every day. I am not just talking about nursing managment, I am talking about every department manager that puts the budget above everything else. These people need to be educated about how the cost of each lost nurse drains the system. They nickle and dime while it cost thousands of dollars to replace an experienced LPN or RN. UPMC nurses are underpaid, over worked and disrespected at all levels of managment in every department. Expecially by accountants who think we are over paid techs. It seems that Gail is trying to turn the tide. Hope she is successful.
    Last edit by Judee Smudee on Apr 8, '05

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