Heart Association: Hands-only CPR works - page 2

In a major change, the American Heart Association said Monday that hands-only CPR -- rapid, deep presses on the victim's chest until help arrives -- works just as well as standard CPR for sudden... Read More

  1. by   Southernkitten
    My son is 19 years old. He was at work yesterday (sandwich shop) when someone crashed to the floor and the woman with him began screaming, "Don't you do this to me, Bobby!". My son called 911, then proceeded to evaluate the man who had a weak, thready pulse at first, then vanished. He began chest compressions and mouth to mouth resuscitation and continued for the three minutes it took for the paramedics to get there. When they got there, they got out "a box" and he said they didn't continue the CPR. The man died. My son is so distraught. He learned CPR as a lifeguard in the Boy Scouts and was taught if you do it, the person will LIVE. He doesn't know if the "box" was an AED or what - how can I help him understand that he did the right thing with courage and conviction and its not his fault the man died?
  2. by   clayah
    Southernkitten,
    Your son did a very heroic deed. He should be commended for his actions.
    Two friends of my son, when they were 19 & 20, stopped at an accident, but the young 20 year old victim died in their arms. Very tragic (they both became EMT's after that). I didn't know what to say to my son's friends, except that they did the right thing and the result was not in their hands.
    It must be very difficult for your son - he sounds like such a caring individual.
    Remeber the thread from the Pedi nurse (sorry, I forgot her name) whose first Code was unsuccessful and the child died. Obviously she was quite upset.
    However, she continued to be a nurse, thankfully, and her second code ( she had an instinct something was wrong) with a child was successful.
    It sounds like your son needs time to process all that has occurred.
    I'll pray for this heroic young man. You must be very proud!
  3. by   Penguin08
    I am a new nurse (LPN) so this may sound stupid, but please bare with me for educational purposes. I just don't get how it does any good to do chest compressions if you are not oxygenating the blood. Could someone please explain this to me?
  4. by   Southernkitten
    Penguin08, The theory behind chest compression CPR only is that as the chest is compressed it forces the air that is in the lungs into the blood stream, thereby oxygenating it at the same time the heart is being struck to get it to beat. The clinical trials looked good, leading people to say you can get the same results with chest compressions only. But that's just what I've heard - I am still a nursing student
  5. by   rjflyn
    Quote from Southernkitten
    My son is 19 years old. He was at work yesterday (sandwich shop) when someone crashed to the floor and the woman with him began screaming, "Don't you do this to me, Bobby!". My son called 911, then proceeded to evaluate the man who had a weak, thready pulse at first, then vanished. He began chest compressions and mouth to mouth resuscitation and continued for the three minutes it took for the paramedics to get there. When they got there, they got out "a box" and he said they didn't continue the CPR. The man died. My son is so distraught. He learned CPR as a lifeguard in the Boy Scouts and was taught if you do it, the person will LIVE. He doesn't know if the "box" was an AED or what - how can I help him understand that he did the right thing with courage and conviction and its not his fault the man died?
    Your son did what was right, paramedic's typically use a manual defibrillator, as far as the medics not continuing CPR well there may well have been a logical reason for that.

    In some instances their protocols allow that if a patient is aystolic i.e. flat line on the monitor and pulse-less they can call it and pronounce the patient dead at that point hence why the above occurs more and more often.

    Others such as my local/county require at least a round of drugs, along with other treatments that go with it. In this case they would continue CPR, transport the patient to the hospital. More often than not it is a futile attempt at best as survival to discharge is less than 1%.

    Rj
    Last edit by rjflyn on Apr 6, '08
  6. by   txpixiedust
    I teach American Heart Association CPR classes, both BLS and Heartsaver AED (layperson CPR). They sent an email to all the instructors this week, to clarify their stance on the new "Hands Only CPR."

    The official AHA stance is that "Hands Only CPR" is for out of hospital ADULTS, WHO COLLAPSE IN FRONT OF YOU!!!

    These situations need RESCUE BREATHING & COMPRESSIONS.....
    1.All Infants/Children regardless of the situation
    2.Adult Victim with known breathing problems/or breathing problems caused the attack
    3.All Drowning victims
    4.All Victim you "find" unconscious
    5.Any Victim you find not breathing

    I hate that the media is making a big deal of this. Something is better than nothing, but compressions alone are not always "good enough."

    txpixiedust
  7. by   AprilRNhere
    Quote from Penguin08
    I am a new nurse (LPN) so this may sound stupid, but please bare with me for educational purposes. I just don't get how it does any good to do chest compressions if you are not oxygenating the blood. Could someone please explain this to me?
    Because you don't breath out ALL oxygen with every breath. Therefore..if you collapse...you still have a large amount of oxygen in your body. Chest compressions will move that around. Oxygen is still needed..but if the general public will not do mouth to mouth...it's a positive thing to push for compressions so you move what is there through the body.

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