Foreign Nurses Charged For Walking Off Job - page 17

Smithtown nurses charged with endangering kids after walk-out Ten nurses who abruptly resigned from their jobs last year at a Smithtown nursing center were charged Thursday -- along with an... Read More

  1. by   pinoy_guy
    op-ed: safe-staffing legislation for nurses needed

    a piece by barbara crane, president of the new york state nurses association delegate assembly

    it diverts attention from what the nurses did, and wants to shift attention to staffing practices.

    i think they should pursue both lines of investigation: determine if the nurses were innocent or guilty, and determine if the agency had been doing some staffing shenanigans.
  2. by   pinoy_guy
    in nurse case, it's kids who need band-aid
    [color=dimgray]october 30, 2007

    supporting nurses who decided to stop nursing.
    the nurses did not stop nursing, some of them are working in other us hospitals.


    it's counterintuitive, but that's what's become of the case of the 10 nurses, who are charged with conspiracy and endangerment.
    it's not counterintuitive, if the writer had taken the time to read the decisions of the courts on the case.


    for spota, getting rid of the case should be a no-brainer. he's made a reputation as a foe of political corruption. and even if he believes he did nothing wrong by sitting down with sentosacare officials, appearances are important.
    is this writer suggesting the case be dropped to keep up with appearances???


    the case against the nurses - apparently the first of its kind in the state - has made it through a grand jury, as well as supreme court justice robert doyle, who used unusually strong language in saying the matter should move forward, again, to a jury. " ... their mass resignation could have had disastrous consequences for the very patients with whose care they were entrusted," he wrote.

    they were cleared of any professional wrongdoing, months before their indictment, by the state board that regulates nursing.
    were the nurses really cleared?

    [font=courier new]tom dunn, a spokesperson for the n.y.s. education department's office of the professions (nysed-op),which oversees the licensure and practice of nurses, would not comment on this specific matter, describing it as "evolving." he did, however, refer to the department's position regarding patient abandonment. "the position makes a distinction between patient abandonment (in which a nurse receives a patient assignment and then leaves before another appropriate person arrives) and employer abandonment (e.g., when nurses are abused, not paid for hours worked, required to work overtime, and not properly trained to take on their expected responsibilities)."


    and, as barbara crane, president of the state nurses' association, told me yesterday, "i've talked to nurses around the country, and the reaction is pure shock. this does not belong in court." she said she was glad that the accused nurses are putting up a fight, that they are "taking on a political machine."
    because the nurses asked did not know the full story.


    and why didn't sentosacare, the corporation, which knew that filipino nurses working at its nursing homes were unhappy, anticipate that resignations one day earlier at an affiliated nursing home in new york city could spread to long island?
    you don't see mass resignations every day.
  3. by   pinoy_guy
    supporters rally for indicted nurses
    [color=dimgray]october 30, 2007

    steven schmidt of northport, whose stepson was in avalon's pediatric ventilator unit for five months in 2005 and left seven months before the nurses quit, praised them. "we know the nurses cared and management didn't care and that's why i am here," schmidt told the crowd.
    this person is not talking about the same nurses.

    report: july/august 2006
    for these nurses, the bad old days are back


    the link is dead, but relevant portions are quoted here.

    on nov. 23, salve and other nurses were given a one-day orientation at brookhaven rehabilitation and healthcare center in queens. the next day [nov. 24], they were sent out on the floors.

    . . .

    after nearly five months, they had reached the limit of their endurance. on april 6 they filed a complaint with the u.s. department of justice. during the following three days, the nurses resigned from their various facilities.
    as the nurses in the case worked for "nearly five months," i don't think steven schmidt of northport even met these nurses as [his stepson] left seven months before the nurses quit.
  4. by   EmmaG
    Quote from pinoy_guy
    supporters rally for indicted nurses
    [color=dimgray]october 30, 2007


    this person is not talking about the same nurses.

    report: july/august 2006
    for these nurses, the bad old days are back


    the link is dead, but relevant portions are quoted here.


    as the nurses in the case worked for "nearly five months," i don't think steven schmidt of northport even met these nurses as [his stepson] left seven months before the nurses quit.
    you're referencing two different facilities.
  5. by   pinoy_guy
    Quote from emmanuel goldstein
    you're referencing two different facilities.
    http://www.mb.com.ph/issues/2006/09/...091974869.html


    upon arrival in new york, as was agreed upon in manila, while they were waiting for their permits to work, the nurses were given clerical work in the facilities as part of their orientation in the american health care system.

    . . .

    the moment their work permits as nurses came, they were assigned to the sentosacare facilities and paid as nurses up to us an hour.

    now, why did jacinto and other nurses "twist" their stories against their recruiter and employer?

    apparently, another firm offered the group higher-paying jobs and a million dollars each for filing cases against sentosacare, through a filipino lawyer.
    from various news sources, the 10 (from the original 27) were from the same batch, arrived in new york within weeks of each other, and were sent to different sentosacare facilities.
  6. by   EmmaG
    Quote from pinoy_guy
    http://www.mb.com.ph/issues/2006/09/...091974869.html



    from various news sources, the 10 (from the original 27) were from the same batch, arrived in new york within weeks of each other, and were sent to different sentosacare facilities.
    i understand that.
  7. by   stevenschmidt
    Quote from pinoy_guy
    supporters rally for indicted nurses
    [color=dimgray]october 30, 2007


    this person is not talking about the same nurses.

    report: july/august 2006
    for these nurses, the bad old days are back


    the link is dead, but relevant portions are quoted here.


    as the nurses in the case worked for "nearly five months," i don't think steven schmidt of northport even met these nurses as [his stepson] left seven months before the nurses quit.
    hi, i'm the steven schmidt quoted. i met 5 of the nurses who were indicted. my wife, who was an rn, had a good opinion of them and a negative opinion of the facility. my stepson is now in gurwin, thankfully. (my wife died of cervical cancer. caretakers: don't forget to take care of yourself)
  8. by   RedZeppelinRN
    Quote from lllliv
    "The 10 nurses who abruptly resigned from their jobs at a Smithtown nursing center will be protected by federal labor law unless Suffolk prosecutors can prove the walkout endangered patients, a federal labor official said Friday."If you walk out to protest working conditions, that kind of subject matter is a legitimate basis of protest," said Al Blyer, director of the National Labor Relations Board's Brooklyn region, which covers Long Island."The burden is going to be on the employer to show that by this walkout, they really put into jeopardy the health of the patients."
    Unionized workers must give 10 days' notice preceding a work stoppage, but because the nurses were non-union, they were not required to give notice under the National Labor Relations Act."

    i found this quote on another message board but it didn't give a link to the source. i don't think the nurses did anything wrong. they finished their shift and quit.
    So signing a contract means nothing?
  9. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from RedZeppelinRN
    So signing a contract means nothing?
    Weren't they claiming that by fostering the kind of work environment that led to the walkout that the employers had breeched the contract, though? That being the case, yes, having signed a contract means nothing because their argument was that the contract they signed was null and void.
  10. by   presuppose
    UNblankingbelievable.... I can't recall ever actually wanting to leave the hospital mid-shift. This bunch can go right back to where they came from and forget about working in the U.S. We DON'T leave our patients unsafe no matter how badly the promises are broken. Geeeze - go get a job elsewhere, but don't ever ever leave your patient.:angryfire
  11. by   RedZeppelinRN
    Quote from presuppose
    UNblankingbelievable.... I can't recall ever actually wanting to leave the hospital mid-shift. This bunch can go right back to where they came from and forget about working in the U.S. We DON'T leave our patients unsafe no matter how badly the promises are broken. Geeeze - go get a job elsewhere, but don't ever ever leave your patient.:angryfire
    Where does it say they "left mid-shift?" I thought it was about giving adequate notice, not going to the right sources and stooping to the other's level. Does not surprise me what they did. My State is overloaded with these immigrants.

    Red
    Last edit by RedZeppelinRN on Mar 12, '08 : Reason: correction!
  12. by   RedZeppelinRN
    [quote=RedZeppelinRN;2711375]Where does it say they "left mid-shift?" I thought it was about giving adequate notice, not going to the right sources and stooping to the other's level. Does not surprise me what they did. My State is overloaded with these immigrants.

    Red[/quote

    I'm sorry, I meant I "wished I could shift about how I was humiliated by these immigrants, the white manager and DON. But I never left my shift, continued my work and went home. I have seen other nurses being put in a position of "abandonment," like purposely not scheduling someone to relieve your shift on New Years Eve.

    Red
  13. by   pinoy_guy
    sentosa case common for pinoy nurses

    i'm sad to say that i think this news article is true...for a small fraction of filipino nurses.

    this is why i want to bring this out into the open: to make people understand that most filipinos honor their contracts, and that these contract-breachers are a minority.

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