Death after two-hour ER wait ruled homicide - page 16

Death after two-hour ER wait ruled homicide "WAUKEGAN, Illinois (AP) -- A coroner's jury has declared the death of a heart attack victim who spent almost two hours in a hospital waiting room to be... Read More

  1. by   sadlady
    This is scary for us, the folks who are NOT in the medical feild, and have health problems. My ex is in Kenosha Wi. in a hospital there due to Anoxic Brain Injury Necrosis secondary to a massive MI. If the EMT's would have not taken 20 minutes lolly gagging around, he would be recovering, not laying brain dead from the lack of Oxygen. There are 3 hospitals in our city, and this one shall remain nameless, but I can say this-I go to a different one than my ex was taken to, and I myself have had the MI called acute coronary syndrome, and I was transferred to another hospital for my angio & stent procedure. When I first arrived at this hospital and walked into the ER myself, I told them I am here because I have ALL the signs and symptoms of a heart attack and need to be seen now. They escorted me back to a cardio room and BAM, monitors, auto BP cuff, o2 & o2 levels, IV and Blood drawn immediately. 15 min. later, I was told I'd suffered some damage to my heart and needed a angio...I live close to waukegan, but sure am glad I have a good hospital here !!! They say women do not get the same attention as men when they have symptoms of heart attacks- I say lets focus on educating women to the symptoms and make them their own advocates!
  2. by   Simplepleasures
    Whoa, super bad judgement.
  3. by   RN BSN 2009
    One question as a newbie - What's a diversion?

    And so far I've seen so many assumptions in these posts, things that weren't addressed in the original thing... Cheeseburgers and cigarettes... then talking about illegals.. then flaming new grads? Whew!
  4. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from iceyspots
    One question as a newbie - What's a diversion?

    And so far I've seen so many assumptions in these posts, things that weren't addressed in the original thing... Cheeseburgers and cigarettes... then talking about illegals.. then flaming new grads? Whew!
    When the ER is so slammed they cannot take any more patients, the ER has to "divert" patients to other hospitals.

    Management hates it when we have to do that because it decreases revenue.
  5. by   tddowney
    Quote from ERTRAVELER
    The criminal issures here are all the sore throats and belly aches that take up precious time and rooms in the ER because that's where their FREE access card covers them 100% coverage. People who come in and demand we give them Tylenol because they can't "afford" to buy it, but they can afford that $5.00 pack of cigarettes in their pockets
    Don't get me started.

    Before moving to go to nursing school, I was an EMT in a small town with one ambulance (the next closest was 50 miles away).

    I've seen too many people with $500/month cigarette and booze bills, or who have every game system out with all the latest games, but who "can't afford" health insurance.

    They can, they choose not to. It's by no means limited to people who are actually poor.

    They are also the likely ones to call 911 for a trivial complaint, attention seeking, or simply a free ride to the bigger town because they're drunk. Meanwhile, someone who is really experiencing an emergency has to wait an hour for another ambulance to transport them. :angryfire

    Until we get smart enough to penalize people who abuse the EMS system, this will continue to get worse.
  6. by   tddowney
    "They say women do not get the same attention as men when they have symptoms of heart attacks- I say lets focus on educating women to the symptoms and make them their own advocates!"

    Excellent suggestion.

    I see the beginnings of it happening, but just the beginning in some news media, etc.

    I try to never miss a chance to bring up the topic (and no doubt bore the H-E-Double Hockey Sticks out of my friends and family).
  7. by   burn out
    A person lost their life because someone failed to act and improperly assessed this patient..one of the first things any health care worker either CNA, to nurse to doctor is to take chest pain seriously. This cardinal rule was not adhered to and someone died..yes someone needs to be held responsible ..to do anything less would be a mockery to the deceased...to do less could put another person at risk. Homicide? is a bit overkill ..it was a mistake not something that was planned with malice or forethought.
  8. by   Roy Fokker
    The whole BS surrounding the Duke case (and the case following "patient abandonment" post-Katrina) taught me that prosecutorial misconduct is often praised as "being tough on crime".

    This case only serves to further that thought. Grand jury "indictments" are a joke - juries rarely, if ever, throw prosecutors cases out ... no matter how laughably thin the evidence presented maybe.

    I'm with Timothy on this one and second his opinion regarding "malpractice" of lawyers and judges.

    cheers,
    Last edit by Roy Fokker on Jan 15, '07
  9. by   RNS for Unity
    This death in the ER is unfortunate, especially for those directly affected like the deceased, their family and the poor nurse caught up in this situation.
    I HAVE A SUGGESTION FOR THESE TYPES OF SERIOUS ER VISITS, THAT THE MDS/PAS/NPS CARRY EMERGENCY PAGERS, WITHIN THE ER, TO ALLOW THEM TO COME AND EVALUATE THESE TYPE OF EMERGENT CASES, SO THAT THE SITUATION CAN IMMEDIATELY BE DEALT WITH AND THE PRACTITIONER CAN SEE THESE PATIENTS IMMEDIATELY. THE ERS SHOULD ALSO HAVE LOCATOR BADGES/INDICATOR LIGHTS TO INDICATE WHERE THE ER MEDICAL PERSONELL ARE SO THAT THESE PATIENTS CAN BE IMMEDIATELY DISCUSSED AND TAKEN CARE OF. NOT GIVEN A NUMBER AND BE EXPECTED TO WAIT THEIR TURN. ALSO THE METHOD OF TRIAGING DETERMINATIONS SHOULD BE DISPLAYED FOR PATIENTS TO CREATE A GREATER UNDERSTANDING BY THE CONSUMERS OF HEALTH CARE, OF THE NEED FOR PRIORITIZATION OF HEALTHCARE.

    RNS FOR UNITY.
    Last edit by RNS for Unity on Jan 16, '07
  10. by   oignurse
    My first question is, what is the facilities chest pain protocol?
    My second question is, was the triage nurse trained by the facility on the chest pain protocol?
  11. by   azreddun
    I reading this thread as I'm sitting in ED triage and it makes me sad & angry. I've been here an hour and I've triaged back pain X6months, tingling under the tongue, cold symptoms, cold symptoms #2, 8 wks pregnant w/threatened ab. I'm sorry all these people could go to their doctors office. Also, someone who says she has, "pnuemonia" managed to go through the night ok because she left after a 3 hour wait last night without being seen, told me she would be outside smoking if they called her. All these people want to be seen "in order" and make a big fuss if they don't get called "in order." I took a gentleman back with CP first thing, I always tell my charge and document any CP with the response that I get, ie, no room right now. When it's really crazy, I will push them back into the ED and park them in the middle of the area, because I'm not going to be liable for someone dying in the waiting area. Sorry if I sound callous, but I always try to do what is best for patient, even though it then burdens the rest of the staff. There are no easy answers. I can't imagine the nurse in this thread comitted homicide, but after reading about the nurse giving 8 grams of dilantin IV in the ER and immediately killing the patient, not so sure...
  12. by   nursetina05
    I agree that the state of emergency room care is lacking. During flu season a few years ago I was 4 months pregnant, dehydrated, dry heaving, with a fever and severe abd cramps and a history of MC. I went to the local ED and waited for 9 hours to be seen. I was laying in the floor (because there were no charis to be had and no one would give one up) and, per my husband, about 30 people went to the nurse and begged them to "help the pregnant lady", many offering to give up their place "in line". The nurse told them my case was not an emergency and she could not put me ahead of them even at their request. (Did I mention most of these people were there with the flu?) In the end it all turned out fine...my son will be 3 this summer, but it could have been so much worse!!
  13. by   softstorms
    I am still wondering why the greater population thinks the lesser population(doctors and nurses) can pick and choose who gets care first? We don't know your background, and we most often never learn about it. That is not to say we don't care, but only to say we don't have time to learn about it. Often we are given many people to care for and treat, in a short amount of time. Our heart can not be where our body is demanded to be. So we just keep treating those we think need it most at that time. As nurses and doctors, we can not choose the time you leave this world. Most time circumstances have already determined that. You just ask us to change that. When we cannot, you think we are inept. Now ask me why we do not have enough nurses.

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