Clark County struggles to acclimatize foreign nurses

  1. clark county struggles to acclimatize foreign nurses
    las vegas sun - las vegas,nv,usa


    las vegas (ap) - after four decades of recruiting nurses from other countries during a nursing shortage, health care officials in the united states are still having trouble acclimating those nurses to western society, a university of nevada, las vegas professor says.

    yu xu, coordinator of unlv's phd in nursing program, is planning on developing a curriculum that can be used for hospitals nationwide.
    without proper training, "the nurses lose, the hospital loses and, most importantly, the american public loses," he said.
    proper nurse training can mean the difference between life and death, xu said. "because of the communication issues and the transitional issues, this has a direct bearing on patient safety," xu said...



    the nursing profession has conducted little research into how to properly acclimate foreign nurses into the field, according to cheryl peterson, a senior policy analyst with the american nurses association.
    "i think that we're finally paying attention to it," she said.
    the association plans to hold a conference in chicago next month to discuss what some hospitals have found to be the best methods for helping the nurses to adjust.
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  3. by   lindarn
    Quote from nrskarenrn
    clark county struggles to acclimatize foreign nurses
    las vegas sun - las vegas,nv,usa


    las vegas (ap) - after four decades of recruiting nurses from other countries during a nursing shortage, health care officials in the united states are still having trouble acclimating those nurses to western society, a university of nevada, las vegas professor says.

    yu xu, coordinator of unlv's phd in nursing program, is planning on developing a curriculum that can be used for hospitals nationwide.
    without proper training, "the nurses lose, the hospital loses and, most importantly, the american public loses," he said.
    proper nurse training can mean the difference between life and death, xu said. "because of the communication issues and the transitional issues, this has a direct bearing on patient safety," xu said...
    all of the money that they are using to "acclimate" foreign nurses from 3rd world countries, could/would be better spent on american nurses who have left bedside nursing. it never seems to amaze me how hospitals continue to control the nursing profession by continuing this practice. there is no need to bring in foreign nurses to this country. we have more than enough nurses to staff the hospitals.

    as for the grossly underpaid nursing instructors, one of this country's colleges just announced on the news that they are paying something like $600,000 a year to this guy. and colleges complain that they can't afford to pay nursing instructors more money?

    lindarn, rn, bsn, ccrn
    spokane, washington
  4. by   FireStarterRN
    I read in a British publication that there is a major ethical debate over the bringing nurses over from countries where there is an even more dire public health crisis than in the Western World. In the UK they also import nurses, many from South Africa and other places where there is a lot of poverty and a lack of trained professionals. They have tried to reduce their dependance on this resource because of the negative impact it has on the nations from which they were recruiting.

    I agree, I think we should be diversifying our workforce from our domestic pool, rather than rob countries that are already hardpressed. We can certainly find qualified Americans here.
  5. by   chichimitchi
    as a foreign graduate, its insulting to hear those kinds of things, pero it doesn't mean i disagree with it completely. i believe that its the hospitals responsibility to make sure that these nurse know what their doing before they let them work to avoid these kinds of problem. But, try not to generalize because not all of us cause problems..
  6. by   lksalter
    Quote from chichimitchi
    as a foreign graduate, its insulting to hear those kinds of things, pero it doesn't mean i disagree with it completely. i believe that its the hospitals responsibility to make sure that these nurse know what their doing before they let them work to avoid these kinds of problem. But, try not to generalize because not all of us cause problems..
    I don't believe there is any debate on the qualifications of foreign nurses brought into the US, but the adjustment to our culture and way we do things in our hospitals. After being in Germany for 2 years now, there are certain cultural things that I needed to adjust to just in living here. Since nursing is quite different here, I can't work.

    I am returning to the US this week and I am really concerned whether I want to return to bedside nursing again. When I left my hospital, I was on high blood pressure medication and within a month after leaving I was off the med. I am a NICU nurse and was taking care of 3 critically ill babies on ventilators. When I graduated I was only taking care of one critical and on some days they would give me a more stable baby. That was 17 years ago.

    I agree that if they would spend this money on improving the current staffing we would see more and more nurses returning to the bedside. Instead, we have sicker patients, less staff and a serious lack of respect for each other. What I don't understand is that we have heard these complaints from nurses all over the country for years and nothing has been done to improve the conditions. When I spoke to another nurse at the hospital I left they were considering splitting shifts and adding more per diem. That's a step in the right direction, but will it solve the crisis?
  7. by   teeituptom
    Quote from lindarn
    All of the money that they are using to "acclimate" foreign nurses from 3rd world countries, could/would be better spent on American nurses who have left bedside nursing. It never seems to amaze me how hospitals continue to control the nursing profession by continuing this practice. There is no need to bring in foreign nurses to this country. We have more than enough nurses to staff the hospitals.

    As for the grossly underpaid nursing instructors, one of this country's colleges just announced on the news that they are paying something like $600,000 a year to this guy. And colleges complain that they can't afford to pay nursing instructors more money?

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    He is a nursing instructor and gets 600,000 a year. Im not begrudging him in the least. Is he the head of the department or something. Tell us more.
    I get 6 figures annually for the last 12 years now.
  8. by   lindarn
    Quote from teeituptom
    He is a nursing instructor and gets 600,000 a year. Im not begrudging him in the least. Is he the head of the department or something. Tell us more.
    I get 6 figures annually for the last 12 years now.
    I am sorry that I did not make myself clear. He is NOT a nursing instructor. He is a BASKETBALL COACH. As I said, that they have money for!!

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  9. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from lindarn
    I am sorry that I did not make myself clear. He is NOT a nursing instructor. He is a BASKETBALL COACH. As I said, that they have money for!!

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    yeah, well...you know, america and its' priorities.

    leslie
  10. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from chichimitchi
    as a foreign graduate, its insulting to hear those kinds of things, pero it doesn't mean i disagree with it completely. i believe that its the hospitals responsibility to make sure that these nurse know what their doing before they let them work to avoid these kinds of problem. But, try not to generalize because not all of us cause problems..
    there's absolutely no need to feel insulted.
    look at it more objectively.
    does it make sense to have a surplus of u.s. nurses, yet recruit and train the foreign-based ones?

    leslie
  11. by   teeituptom
    Quote from earle58
    yeah, well...you know, america and its' priorities.

    leslie

    The least thing is, he could have been a GOLF coach,
  12. by   sonnyluv
    No offense to foreign nurses but you are more or less a tool for large, corporate hospital systems to provide inadequate and thereby by cheaper patient care. You also serve corporate interests by undermining North Amercian nurses' leverage of the profession.
    I have worked with foreign nurses from all over the world, some fresh off the boat, and I can honestly say that many have no business working in an english speaking world let alone a hospital. I can also say that may foreign nurses are awesome nurses who are an invaluable asset to the units they work in. The question is: Is it worth the risk and the subsequent cost to minimize that risk given the high demand that the average American college student has shown in nursing?

    I worked at West Anaheim Medical Center's ER two years ago. At that time the ICU was staffed Entirely by Philipino nurses on visa. Somehow, the ICU was run in Tagalog. The ER nurse transporting to the ICU had to wait for the charge to take report because the other nurses couldn't understand English! The ICU nurses had a foul disposition because their rperesenting agency was wrongly taking the majority of their wages from them, I think they were getting paid $15-20 an hour, for working in the ICU! They were being taken advantage of and it was wrong. Terrrible situation.

    The bottom line: foreign nurses coming here are not good for their home countries and economically speaking, they are worse for American nurses. Instead of spending money on familiarizing foreign nurses to American culture how about cutting down some of those 2 and 3 year waiting lists to get into nursing school...
  13. by   Natkat
    Quote from sonnyluv
    The ER nurse transporting to the ICU had to wait for the charge to take report because the other nurses couldn't understand English! The ICU nurses had a foul disposition because their rperesenting agency was wrongly taking the majority of their wages from them, I think they were getting paid $15-20 an hour, for working in the ICU! They were being taken advantage of and it was wrong. Terrrible situation.
    In the ICU!!!

    How did these nurses do patient teaching? How did the patients communicate their problems to the nurse?

    That makes my hair stand on end.
  14. by   leslie :-D
    posted in wrong thread.
    sorry.

    leslie

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