Cincinnati Nursing Shortage Future

  1. Aggressive recruitment and bigger classes at local nursing schools have helped cut the region's nursing shortage by more than half in the last two years.
    In 2004, 20 percent of jobs for registered nurses were vacant, according to data from the Greater Cincinnati Health Council, which includes Northern Kentucky and parts of Indiana. Today, the vacancy rate is 8 percent.
    That is good news, health-care providers say, but only a temporary fix.

    Another, more serious shortage is looming as baby boomers age. The demand for care will jump while the supply of caregivers shrinks, said Mary Duffey, the health council's director of workforce development.
    By 2020, more than one in four hospital nursing jobs in Ohio could be unfilled, according to the Ohio Nursing Association. A 2004 survey by the Ohio Board of Nursing found that almost half of 96,000 nurses surveyed planned to leave the field in the next decade.
    Hospitals are planning to ramp up recruitment efforts even further while they look for ways to keep nurses on the job longer. And nursing schools are increasing class sizes, hiring more teachers and revamping programs to provide more graduates.

    Full Story: Nurses on call [Cincinnati Enquirer,OH]
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    About Brian, ADN

    Joined: Mar '98; Posts: 15,418; Likes: 16,398
    allnurses.com founder; from US
    Specialty: 18+ year(s) of experience in CCU, Geriatrics, Critical Care, Tele

    8 Comments

  3. by   helpingismypassion
    Hi Brian, I live in Cinti and I feel that cinti lacks alot of things as far as hiring process. I beieve that a person should be given a chance its hard for new nurses to get jobs in the hospitals here. They also have a shortage of CNA's and that is due also to themm not given people a chance I have worked at a couple of hospitals here but was also toldby UC that I didn't have enough expierience and I have over 20 yrs in the field. We need to open our doors more and be more willing to work with people since we have such a shortage going on.
  4. by   HARRN2b
    I do not understand. If there is a shortage why do they not hire people. Also, since when is 20 years not enough experience? Really, I don't get it.
  5. by   lands1980
    At five years,many hospitals don't want to pay the anything passed the new grad rates and the more experienced nurses question practice issues,management and staffing problems.
  6. by   HARRN2b
    So why stay in nursing longer than 5 years. Oh, I guess that is why there is a shortage. Yes??
  7. by   charebec65
    This is somewhat off the topic at hand but has to do with something mentioned in the article that was attached.....

    The article speaks of a local university what is offering an MSN program for people with a Bachelor's degree. It doesn't matter what degree. I personally think this is a bit scary.... Any other opinions?
  8. by   sunnyjohn
    Quote from charebec65
    This is somewhat off the topic at hand but has to do with something mentioned in the article that was attached.....

    The article speaks of a local university what is offering an MSN program for people with a Bachelor's degree. It doesn't matter what degree. I personally think this is a bit scary.... Any other opinions?
    Quote from From the article
    Xavier University offers a two-year master's degree designed for adults with bachelor's degrees in fields other than nursing. Graduates will finish the program with master's degrees in nursing - and jobs.
    The program is two years long. They must still have the prereqs (A&P, Statistics Micro, and a decent GRE score), a current resume, three references, a personal essay and interview (possibly) and the ability to study full-time for two years(including summers) in order to gain admission. Xavier teaches them to function as new graduate nurses and incoporates the 'newish' clinical nurse leader role.

    This is a generic MSN. The graduates are not NPs or Clinical nurse specialist or anything like that. They are generalist with advanced class training who with a few years of bedside experiece can move into other roles. If they want to be an NP or CNS, they have to go back and get a post-grad certificate and more training.

    Essentially it allows folks who have a Bachelor's who want a Masters to get one, and it allows folks who have a Bachelor's and can't qualify for more financial aid to get an ADN or second BSN to still afford nursing school

    The folsk that graduate on from the program are more than trained to function as new nurses. Search for more thread here on all nurses about the topic directy-entry Masters programs.
    Last edit by sunnyjohn on Sep 1, '06
  9. by   HARRN2b
    I just checked their website. They also offer nursing with a hispanic focus. This makes sense. Latinos will be the largest population in future years. Xavier's site says it is a very large growing population in Cincinnati and that is why they have chosen to offer it. I think it is 15 extra credit hours. Not a bad idea, really.
  10. by   helpingismypassion
    well i'm not quite sure why i don't have enough experience but i tried getting in there several times. Thought maybe my work history wasn't good enough but haven't any problems any where else just there at UC.

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