Child diabetes cases 'to double'(Type 1)

  1. An interesting development that points to the fact that lifestyle does also contribute to type 1 diabetes.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8068941.stm

    The number of under-fives in Europe with type 1 diabetes is set to double between 2005 and 2020, say experts.
    The researchers, from Ireland and Hungary, warn cases in older children will also rise substantially.

    Writing in The Lancet, they say genetics alone cannot account for the rapid rise, and suggest lifestyle factors are likely to play a role.

    The study is based on 29,311 cases of type 1 diabetes recorded in 20 European countries between 1989 and 2003.
    The researchers say the increase in type 1 diabetes has been so rapid that it cannot be blamed on genetic factors alone.

    They also point out that the highest increases have been seen in Eastern Europe, where lifestyle habits are changing more rapidly than in richer Western European nations.

    Researcher Dr Chris Patterson said: "The children of older mums are at slightly increased risk of type 1 diabetes as are children born by Caesarean section and children with rapid weight gain early in life, while breast-fed children are at slightly decreased risk.
    Last edit by FireStarterRN on May 28, '09
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    22 Comments

  3. by   frann
    Just another case of a writer that doesn't know crap about diabetes. To suggest that lifestyle factors has anything to do with diagnosis of type 1 is absurd.

    type 1 is a autoimmune disease. Viruses can attach the pancreatic cells and destroy. Thats what happened to my dd. Had scarlet fever in feb 05 then few months later symptoms started.


    "bad news for them, and for the health care systems who must look after them. "
    Who the hell does this guy think he is? Like any type 1 asked to get this disease. Try living a day in our shoes.
  4. by   FireStarterRN
    This is a study done in Europe, not just a bunch of BS. Lifestyle has been linked with autoimmune problems, btw. For instance, the use of antibiotics in the first 6 months of life has been linked to both autoimmune disorders and allergies. Also, an overly hygienic environment has been linked to higher rates of these things.
  5. by   Jolie
    Interesting that infants born by C-section have a higher rate of developing type 1 diabetes.

    Not that an association proves causality, but I hope this finding gives pause to OBs and parents who want to schedule medically unnecessary C-sections for convenience or preference only.
  6. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from Jolie
    Interesting that infants born by C-section have a higher rate of developing type 1 diabetes.

    Not that an association proves causality, but I hope this finding gives pause to OBs and parents who want to schedule medically unnecessary C-sections for convenience or preference only.
    I wonder if it's the fact that C-section moms are given antibiotics? Also, the babes have a higher rate of resp complications and might need more antibiotics.

    As I mentioned, several studies have linked early use of antibiotics with disorders of the immune system. I firmly believe that when we interfere with normal immune response by jumping to use antibiotics, the immune system can be confused into inappropriately attacking something which is not, in fact, a threat.

    Also, today a large percentage of Moms are receiving prophylactic IV antibiotics while in labor because of strep A/B. I'm convinced that this is contributing to the surge in these problems.
  7. by   regularRN
    Frann, scarlet fever is not a virus...
  8. by   blondy2061h
    I would have a hard time believing weight gain causes type 1 diabetes, but I wouldn't have a hard time believing things like pollution and antibiotics increase the risk. I'm not sure I'd label those factors "lifestyle" though.
  9. by   FireStarterRN
    Yes, lifestyle is a funny choice of terminology, I agree. Nevertheless, it's interesting new information that points to the fact that Type 1 diabetes might not be the random disease that we thought it was.

    I do believe my personal choice to abstain from the standard medicine conventional wisdom dictates IS a lifestyle choice for myself that was consciously made. I do believe living holistically could be termed a lifestyle choice.
  10. by   morte
    Researcher Dr Chris Patterson said: "The children of older mums are at slightly increased risk of type 1 diabetes as are children born by Caesarean section and children with rapid weight gain early in life, while breast-fed children are at slightly decreased risk.
    i am wondering if the relationship of Csection to type 1, secondary to the need for the C section?..infection, maternal age, maternal disease......
  11. by   FireStarterRN
    Good point morte. It's a chicken/egg situation.

    I think science is still largely in the dark with auto-immune diseases and their relationship to environmental factors. I also believe there is a lack of scientific integrity at times, that doesn't want to upset the conventional wisdom when it comes to the negative side effects of antibiotics, vaccinations, and other established practices.
  12. by   morte
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    Good point morte. It's a chicken/egg situation.

    I think science is still largely in the dark with auto-immune diseases and their relationship to environmental factors. I also believe there is a lack of scientific integrity at times, that doesn't want to upset the conventional wisdom when it comes to the negative side effects of antibiotics, vaccinations, and other established practices.
    "aint" that the truth.....it may very significant that the quickest rise has been in the countries most newly "westernized", perhaps that should be the center of the next research....and it could be congenital, without being genetic.
  13. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from frann
    type 1 is a autoimmune disease. Viruses can attach the pancreatic cells and destroy. Thats what happened to my dd. Had scarlet fever in feb 05 then few months later symptoms started.
    I understand that stress lowers immunity, inviting bacterial and viral diseases. Autoimmune diseases' etiology has been thought (not proven) to be caused partly by stress, which could initiate the body's immunity against its own systems. It's an inigma!

    Streprococcus (a bacteria) is the source of Scarlet Fever, and I've never heard that pancreatic cells were targeted by it, for destruction. Have you researched that? :imbar
  14. by   FireStarterRN
    Quote from morte
    "aint" that the truth.....it may very significant that the quickest rise has been in the countries most newly "westernized", perhaps that should be the center of the next research....and it could be congenital, without being genetic.
    We have so many new manmade chemicals in our environment that weren't there 100 years ago. Yes, we have better sanitation and don't have cholera outbreaks any more, or other things like that. But we also have a host of new diseases caused by the chemical soup we live in that could be causing congenital abnormalities. Also, the overuse of antibiotics and other wonder drugs most likely has unintended consequences down the road.

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