Babies given wrong dose of Heparin @ Cedar Sinai - page 8

I'm a new nurse and haven't worked in a hospital setting yet, but I was under the impression a lot of facilities were getting away from heplocks and using saline locks instead??? ... Read More

  1. by   BrokenRNheart
    Saw the 60 Minutes feature.

    He is starting a foundation for patient safety.

    Anyone thinking what I am? We know one of the number one patient safety issues. Even if it wasn't from understaffing or overworked, it is a patient safety issue.

    Forget Oprah......write Dennis!
  2. by   oramar
    I thought it was a really good interview. As of this moment no action has been taken against the hospital and nurses by the Quaids. BUT that does not mean there will be done. He DID NOT say there would be none. Did you hear him say that there would have been no more happy days for him had those kids not made it. Awww, that was sweet.
  3. by   BrokenRNheart
    He said he didn't blame the hospital and nurses.

    Baxter has pulled the heparin because of "contamination." That's what they said.

    If it was a staffing error, it may have been staffing. We certainly don't know. But we do know being overworked puts risks on medication administration, dosing and all kinds of care. We are forced to operate like race car drivers with the need to think quick and sharp and in multi areas at all times along with multiple interruptions.
  4. by   chowlover
    It sounds like the pharmacy sent a 10,000 unit dose vial of Heparin to the floor, when they should have sent a1000 U dose. Would the pharmacist who sends drugs to the floor be held liable? Stupid question, but I am a nurse who has worked in a office for many years now, & the only Heparin flushes we have are 1000u
  5. by   mscsrjhm
    Mr. Quaid said something about nurses protecting hospitals, doctors protecting ... I didn't hear it all, but the word "protect" was used alot. If he thinks nurses are protecting hospitals, he might need to talk to more nurses.
    Thank Heavens those children are alright.
    He is apparently creating a foundation re medication errors. "Over 100,000 deaths a year". Where are these deaths? Many, many, years of nursing and I have never personally witnessed or even heard of a death by medication error other than in the news, and that doesn't add up to 100,000 people.
  6. by   Jolie
    Quote from chowlover
    It sounds like the pharmacy sent a 10,000 unit dose vial of Heparin to the floor, when they should have sent a1000 U dose. Would the pharmacist who sends drugs to the floor be held liable? Stupid question, but I am a nurse who has worked in a office for many years now, & the only Heparin flushes we have are 1000u

    1000u/cc is not heparin flush.

    Heparin flush is 10u/cc.
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from Mschrisco
    Mr. Quaid said something about nurses protecting hospitals, doctors protecting ... I didn't hear it all, but the word "protect" was used alot. If he thinks nurses are protecting hospitals, he might need to talk to more nurses.
    Thank Heavens those children are alright.
    He is apparently creating a foundation re medication errors. "Over 100,000 deaths a year". Where are these deaths? Many, many, years of nursing and I have never personally witnessed or even heard of a death by medication error other than in the news, and that doesn't add up to 100,000 people.
    He may have been referring (not v. accurately, but, oh well ...) to the IOM study of a few years ago (it got a lot of press at the time) that reported that there may be up to 98,000 deaths in the US per year due to medical errors -- but that was all kinds of errors occurring in healthcare settings, not strictly medication errors ...

    That's the only reference I can think of off the top of my head. I don't think there have been any other "big" studies recently.
  8. by   Diahni
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    I saw a clip of the interview that will be shown tonight. Trust me, they aren't giving the nurse any slack in this case. The exact words were "the nurse didn't bother to look at the dosage on the bottle"..... And what can we say after all? Apparently he or she didn't........twice.
    That was my interest - if they happened to be understaffed, there could be some concern. Mistakes are much more likely to happen when people are flying, so I was wondering if this was in the mix. I know I'd feel awful if I were that nurse, but is it really true that she didn't "bother"??? Can't really imagine it.
    Diahni
  9. by   tntrn
    Interesting that the Quaid story on 60 Minutes would be followed by a piece about sleep deprivation, and how must it affects our minds and bodies on many levels, after just one night of 4 hours only of sleep. I've been saying for a long time that 12 hour shifts are not safe, and now this study would seem to bolster that. Wonder if the people at Cedars Sinai work 12 or 16 hour shifts?
  10. by   Diahni
    Quote from tntrn
    Interesting that the Quaid story on 60 Minutes would be followed by a piece about sleep deprivation, and how must it affects our minds and bodies on many levels, after just one night of 4 hours only of sleep. I've been saying for a long time that 12 hour shifts are not safe, and now this study would seem to bolster that. Wonder if the people at Cedars Sinai work 12 or 16 hour shifts?
    What's sleep? :chuckle
  11. by   Diahni
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    I think you may be giving the position of nurses too much credit. I wish we were that esteemed. I can guarantee you if he sued the nurse and won, that wouldn't affect his box office one whit especially since he would have been well within his rights.
    Hey, you ARE esteemed - and if somebody says you aren't, well you know what they can do! Whether or not he could prove damages in court, you know this person lost their license. A license can be lost for forgetting to chart - so even if there weren't lasting damages, this situation is over the top. Gotta read the fine print on those bottles yes sirree! I'm not sure if the old stock that was used had an expired date on it.

    On another slant to this infinitely fascinating story, do you think "vanity" surrogacy is a private matter between a women and the surrogate? I've done some research on this, and it accounts for around ten percent of surrogacies in the US. Last I checked, indentured servitude was banned worldwide in 1948. No coffee breaks in pregnancy. As well, if I tried to sell one of my organs to the highest bidder, to be sure it wouldn't be a private matter between me and the receiver. But for the most part, the laws are far behind our technology. This is one example among many. Think I'm going to watch "The Matrix" again.
    Diahni
  12. by   RN1989
    I'm not going to hold my breath for Dennis Quaid to come to the rescue of healthcare and medical error prevention. Errors happen everywhere, every day - the only difference is that they happen to us "common folk". The only reason that anyone cares about what happened to him is because he used to be considered a hot Hollywood star. He's gone through women like kleenex over the past 25 years which makes me think he loses interest easily. I am not going to be impressed until I see that he follows through with effecting positive change and doesn't lose interest in the cause after a few years have gone by or his Hollywood popularity is gone. It always sounds great to say you are going to open a foundation for this and that but lots of people say it and nothing ever happens.
  13. by   Diahni
    Quote from RN1989
    I'm not going to hold my breath for Dennis Quaid to come to the rescue of healthcare and medical error prevention. Errors happen everywhere, every day - the only difference is that they happen to us "common folk".

    RN1989: Yes, this is a huge problem. There will always been human error, but understaffing is but one thing that fuels it. I keep accidentally writing "overstaffing" - maybe I'm thinking "overload" above all else. In recent history, I have noticed that these kind of things are also happening to the "noncommon" among us. Why is this? Some talk show host - Glenn Beck - had to wait a very long time in the ER, and made a public stink about it. Even if some illuminary is doing it for the publicity, it still brings important issues to light. In the past couple of months, both an elderly neighbor and a friend's father had med error type situations happen to them and I live in a very sparsely populated place.I don't have to tell you of all people how endemic this is - 200,000 die a year from med errors - awful.

    RN: The only reason that anyone cares about what happened to him is because he used to be considered a hot Hollywood star. He's gone through women like kleenex over the past 25 years which makes me think he loses interest easily. I am not going to be impressed until I see that he follows through with effecting positive change and doesn't lose interest in the cause after a few years have gone by or his Hollywood popularity is gone. It always sounds great to say you are going to open a foundation for this and that but lots of people say it and nothing ever happens.
    D: Quaid is/was quite the babe - but maybe this can be used for public good. I was very turned off to idea of political celebs - "limosine liberals" I thought what Jane Fonda "Hanoi Jane" did in Vietnam was awful - before your time, but she posed on a North Viet tank - And I was very opposed to the war, still I found it insulting to the US. But I'm coming around. Look at what Brad Pitt is doing in N'orleans - he has a love of architecture and is involved in encouraging rich people to contribute, all or partly to some very cool flood proof hurricane proof houses. I want one! His wife does a lot of humanitarian things too. Self serving? Probably. But so what if they are actually doing some good.

    Nobody is as surprised at me that I'm not so cynical about movie stars getting their hands dirty. Natalie Portman recently said that it pains her that while she can get an audience with a hot shot senator, or the senate in general, while the head of a relief organization can not. Given that this is both revolting and true, I admire that she's working with "what is."

    Can Quaid make a difference? I see it this way - if the many nurses and pharm people, etc. who watched that show had a few moments of pondering about the situation, that's good. I worry about those annoying souls who keep grabbing the medication to double check that you're not messing up with their meds. These folks, no doubt, watched the show, too. As a paying medical consumer on one hand and a nurse on another, I do see it both ways. It's even happened to me recently - an ER doc saw an inflamed insect bite on me and dosed me with huge amounts of antibiotics for Lyme, which I didn't have. The bite wasn't even the reason I was in the ER. I could have said yes sir, and taken the full ten course of meds but I didn't. I'm all for anything that educates the public about pharmaceuticals in this pill popping age.
    Diahni

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