Awesome Nurse Presence at Scene of MVA - page 2

just wanted to share this with you guys...I like the way the nurse is portrayed in this story. Sensitive, yet a BADASS "judy-on-the-spot" chick. :smokin:... Read More

  1. by   OCNRN63
    Quote from Zookeeper3
    while this story has such a happy ending, an unskilled nurse that has no idea how to first address potential harm of the scene and then how to maintain an airway and spinal cord scares me senseless. Way too many good samaritans even nurses will happen on this scene and become injured themselves or cause permanent injury or death to the victim.

    No one will side with me and that's aok as we all wish to be that hero, but few nurses really know what to do. And unless you do, don't touch a victim, call 911 and do crowd control or the basic ABC's. Leave the heroics for the trained first responders and medics.


    I'll just have to be unpopular today. Way too many years of experience scares me as to the potential hero's out there where patients are better left for a simple few moments until expert help arises.. Call me a cynic, I'm just trying to inform our newbies.
    I've got your back.
  2. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Quote from Zookeeper3
    while this story has such a happy ending, an unskilled nurse that has no idea how to first address potential harm of the scene and then how to maintain an airway and spinal cord scares me senseless. Way too many good samaritans even nurses will happen on this scene and become injured themselves or cause permanent injury or death to the victim.

    No one will side with me and that's aok as we all wish to be that hero, but few nurses really know what to do. And unless you do, don't touch a victim, call 911 and do crowd control or the basic ABC's. Leave the heroics for the trained first responders and medics.


    I'll just have to be unpopular today. Way too many years of experience scares me as to the potential hero's out there where patients are better left for a simple few moments until expert help arises.. Call me a cynic, I'm just trying to inform our newbies.
    You're right. In fact even the "Pro's" goof sometimes. Had a quad friend who became quad when the EMT's decided to lift him and counted to 3....but the guy holding his head was on a different page from the other three guys and lifted 1-2-3! and the others lifted 1-2-3-move! The patient heard his neck snap at that moment and remembers saying, " Oh, thanks ALOT!" May have happened anyway, y'know, but it gives me shivers to think about.
  3. by   akulahawkRN
    I'm with zookeeper3 on this. Reading the article, something jumped out at me: tourniquets. Unless the rider truly had some nearly unstoppable bleeding, they're not needed. From what was quoted, that nurse didn't seem like she had been formally trained in prehospital care, perhaps nothing more than basic first aid.

    There is a reason why many states may not allow a nurse to work in the field without having completed a basic EMT course first. This nurse is one such example. Nurses do get a wonderful education, but they're not educated about what to do in the field. As such, they can make dangerous mistakes that put themselves or their patients in jeopardy.

    Don't get me wrong: there are many nurses that are capable, competent field providers and do it right every day. I have nothing specifically against nurses providing care in the field... they just have to be adequately educated for that role.

    If you do not have good first aid training, at least equivalent to a first responder, the best things you can do at the scene of an emergency is call 911, do crowd control, and maintain the basic ABC's. Nothing more. When the pro's get there, step aside and let 'em go to work. Just like nurse pros are in their "home setting," the prehospital folks will be faster, more efficient, and better organized to deal with the problem then you will be.
  4. by   gentlegiver
    Great to hear something nice about Nurses instead of all the bad! Congrats to her for knowing what to do & doing it. I know for a fact that I would be one of the useless ones, I would definately be the one calling 911 and directing traffic. All I have is basic First-Aid so I would have to leave the care to those who know!
  5. by   No Stars In My Eyes
    Quote from gentlegiver
    Great to hear something nice about Nurses instead of all the bad! Congrats to her for knowing what to do & doing it. I know for a fact that I would be one of the useless ones, I would definately be the one calling 911 and directing traffic. All I have is basic First-Aid so I would have to leave the care to those who know!
    Calling 911 and directing traffic is hardly useless! Kudos for being aware of your limits! I once came upon a motorcycle wreck immediately after it occurred and was shaking scared about what to do. Along came a prostitute who immediately KNEW what to do. I had clean towels in my car and brought them to her. Someone else came along who had a cell phone and called 911, while I halted traffic. I was never so glad to see someone as I was when that woman came along; she stopped that man from bleeding to death.
  6. by   jeckrn
    Quote from SummitAP
    I've had some RNs be super useful on MVCs... and.others be super useless/obstacles to care. Depends on the RN. Same for docs.

    Ditto on that in 20+ years EMS. Like how you used MVC vs. MVA.
  7. by   jeckrn
    Quote from Zookeeper3
    while this story has such a happy ending, an unskilled nurse that has no idea how to first address potential harm of the scene and then how to maintain an airway and spinal cord scares me senseless. Way too many good samaritans even nurses will happen on this scene and become injured themselves or cause permanent injury or death to the victim.

    No one will side with me and that's aok as we all wish to be that hero, but few nurses really know what to do. And unless you do, don't touch a victim, call 911 and do crowd control or the basic ABC's. Leave the heroics for the trained first responders and medics.


    I'll just have to be unpopular today. Way too many years of experience scares me as to the potential hero's out there where patients are better left for a simple few moments until expert help arises.. Call me a cynic, I'm just trying to inform our newbies.
    I have worked EMS for 20+ years & ED for around 10 years. Most ED nurses know how to treat the patients once they are packaged but do not know how to package them or what medics go thru in the field. But they are very helpful in the field because they do work with trauma patients on a daily basis. I agree with some RN's are a danger in the field, most LTC nurses have no idea how to work in a field enviornment. Scene safety is the most stessed item in medics training and just a passing in nursing.
  8. by   Zookeeper3
    Thanks all for not being nasty in your responses, we all want to be the hero, but it requires specially trained skills. we must know our limits! Keeping ourselves safe, not moving a potential spinal cord injury, and just turning off the key to the ignition while keeping victims calm is the key until experienced help arrives is key!

    Verbally calming victims to NOT move and wait for skilled help, and calming the scene to crazy "first responders" is what we, if we choose to pull over must be willing to do. A hero is born through those actions alone. Anyone willing to pull over must know this role they play.
  9. by   akulahawkRN
    As long as you know your limits, and work within them, even stopping to help with a horrible crash like that one, you can be far from useless. Over the years, I've met many nurses and paramedics that thought they were god's gift to everything. Those are the ones I worry about in any field.

    Someone once said that heroes and regular people are brave.... it's just that heroes are brave 5 minutes longer. These days, a hero is someone who is willing to step in and DO something, even if it's just arranging for more help to come...

    For that, I commend that nurse that stopped at the scene. There may have been some things she did wrong, but the most important things she did right... she got help on the way and kept people and the victim from panicking. As we all know, once panic sets in, it can be very difficult to regain control.

    Kudos to her!

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