Addicted hospital worker exposed hundreds of patients to Hep C - page 5

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  1. by   emmanewgrad
    This is Super Scary!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! encountered all my emotions.....
    :trout::smackingfmakes me sick!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  2. by   AgentOrange
    OKay, so....am I the only one who found it a bit shady when it was mentioned that she didn't want job no. 2 contacting job no. 1 b/c she still worked there? I think employer no. 2 would have thought so.
    Actually it's expected when applying for a new job that your old employee will NOT be contacted unless you give permission (ie it's a planned layoff or retirement) The reason is to prevent the current employer from retailiating or passing you over for promotions if you decide not to take the new job and to stay with the current employer.
  3. by   darne20
    The part about switching the prefilled syringes scares me. Is it common practice in the OR to walk around with unlabeled prefilled syringes? I'm asking because I was recently having a procedure and the CRNA pulled a filled, unlabeled syringe from her pocket and wanted to push it into my IV; she was irritated when I asked her what it was and hostile when I mentioned that the volume looked wrong for the dose. Is it acceptable practice to walk around with a filled unlabeled syringe which is supposed to contain a controlled substance? Thanks
  4. by   blueheaven
    Quote from Jarnaes
    Yes, anesthesia providers always have meds drawn up & available on their carts, but those meds are not narcotics.
    IMHO: If any provider is stupid enough to leave the narcotics out unattended, they deserve disciplinary action right along with the person who took advantage of the situation.
    Uhhhh, I've seen fentanyl and propofol as well as paralytics etc. drawn up and on anesthesia carts. They also bring a little "goody box" when they respond to codes which has all the meds for a RSI.
  5. by   fireball2424
    this is horrible! I don't understand how someone could do this. a real embarrassment for the rest of us.
  6. by   darne20
    Quote from blueheaven
    Uhhhh, I've seen fentanyl and propofol as well as paralytics etc. drawn up and on anesthesia carts. They also bring a little "goody box" when they respond to codes which has all the meds for a RSI.

    Interesting; my question was for elective surgery is it proper to have meds (controlled or not) drawn up in unlabeled syringes? I didn't think it was proper practice for a CRNA to pull a partially filled 5ml syringe without a label from her pocket then try to squirt it into my IV. All I could think of was: what's actually in that syringe? She said fentanyl which made me nervous because the volume was excessive (and I doubt that they dilute it, maybe I'm wrong); I was thinking maybe wrong drug, not diverted fentanly and a syringe filled with viral scum. I was surprized when she walked away and put the unused "fentanyl" back in her pocket. maybe I was out of line; is this an accepted practice? It worked out because the anesthesiologist took over and did the procedure with only Ancef and lidocaine for the Bier Block. I'm a pharmacist not a nurse, and know little about CRNA practice; I do give a lot of injections (simple stuff like allergy shots)and I know that pulling an unlabeled prefilled syringe from my pocket and injecting a patient wouldn't be acceptable, say, in the allergy clinic. Is this acceptale inthe O.R.?
  7. by   darne20
    Quote from darne20
    Interesting; my question was for elective surgery is it proper to have meds (controlled or not) drawn up in unlabeled syringes? I didn't think it was proper practice for a CRNA to pull a partially filled 5ml syringe without a label from her pocket then try to squirt it into my IV. All I could think of was: what's actually in that syringe? She said fentanyl which made me nervous because the volume was excessive (and I doubt that they dilute it, maybe I'm wrong); I was thinking maybe wrong drug, not diverted fentanly and a syringe filled with viral scum. I was surprized when she walked away and put the unused "fentanyl" back in her pocket. maybe I was out of line; is this an accepted practice? It worked out because the anesthesiologist took over and did the procedure with only Ancef and lidocaine for the Bier Block. I'm a pharmacist not a nurse, and know little about CRNA practice; I do give a lot of injections (simple stuff like allergy shots)and I know that pulling an unlabeled prefilled syringe from my pocket and injecting a patient wouldn't be acceptable, say, in the allergy clinic. Is this acceptale inthe O.R.?
    If this is acceptable practice, it's an invitation to med errors and to drug diversion as mentioned in the opening posting. I'm curious is this is acceptable with CRNA'S. Thanks.
  8. by   mazy
    I'm confused about why she had to have a blood test before being hired. Is this common practice? I've never been asked to submit to a blood test. Did something show up in her pre-screening UA that they wanted to follow up on?
  9. by   Anxious Patient
    These are updates as of today:

    KRISTEN PARKER ORDERED DETAINED WITHOUT BOND

    http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/co/press_r...09/7_9_09.html

    Ex-Medical Technician Is Held Without Bail in Hepatitis C Outbreak in Colorado

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/10/us...r=1&ref=health

    she expressed tearful remorse that anyone might have been hurt.


    I don't understand what this doctor is saying here.

    Dr. Srinivasan, the medical officer for the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, said one thing was clear: no evidence of poor procedures in allowing inappropriate reuse of syringes had been found at either facility that could explain the outbreak.
  10. by   southernbeegirl
    i think what he is saying is that neither facility has been found to be at fault.


    thanks for the update!
  11. by   AgentOrange
    When I used to work hospital, JACHO absolutely forbid unlabeled syringes laying around. There were strict protocols about drawing up syringes ahead of time as well--this was a practice that was to be avoided when possible. Of coures, not all hospitals are JACHO certified. I've also never heard of diluting fentanyl when giving it IV push. Scary stuff is happening at these hospitals. Of course this Dr Srinivasan is claiming that there wasn't poor protocol going on--he wants to minimize the hospitals liability. Obviously there WAS poor protocol going on when someone who wasn't even supposed to have access to these rooms could switch out syringes repeatedly for months.
  12. by   subee
    The story just broke on TV news this evening about a surgical tech arrested in Colorado who may have exposed up to 2,700 patients in Northern Westchester (New York) Medical Center to hep. C. She'd take the Fentanyl syringe from anesthesia machine, inject herself and put in back on machine (with saline inside?). The cunning of an addict - always impresses me. To all those CRNA's who are casual about leaving Fentanyl syringes exposed on your machines - don't do it. This hospital has to notify 2,700 patients, offer Hep C testing and expose shabby practices to the public. 2,700 people who must be very frightened and angry tonight. Our hospital has a $1,000 fine for any anesthesia practitioner who leaves a controlled substance unlocked in the room. This has proven to be a good deterrent.
  13. by   sirI

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