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Do nurse residencies hire non-new grads?

  1. So I've posted here several times about the situation I'm in (HR thought I bribed a patient for a DAISY award) and after taking care of a family member I've been on a nursing hiatus for 18 months.

    I've been looking at nurse residencies and new grad positions as a way to get me back into nursing/change specialties/get my skills back up to par. So far I've been unsuccessful but I'm still trying.

    Should I abandon trying to apply for these positions? Will new grad residencies only hire new grads?
  2. Visit AesthesiaSeeker profile page

    About AesthesiaSeeker, BSN, RN

    Joined: Jul '13; Posts: 49; Likes: 18

    6 Comments

  3. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from AesthesiaSeeker
    Will new grad residencies only hire new grads?
    That's typically the case, but you'd have to look at the requirements for each residency that you're interested to be 100% sure. Some might take you with up to six months of experience. Some might even take you with a little bit more than that. Some might look at your graduation date as well as, or in place of, your level of experience.
    Good luck on your search.
  4. by   beekee
    You got fired after 9 months and have been out of work for 18. Time to apply to anywhere and everywhere, including LTC, rehab, assisted living, home care, dialysis, ANYTHING. You can work your way back to acute care, if that's your goal, but right now you are teetering on unemployable. Just get a nursing job.
  5. by   AesthesiaSeeker
    I like this, I really do, and I know at the end of the day that's all that counts.

    But these past 18 months have really been hell. My sister developed a drug problem and my parents wanted me home to help take care of her. I started eating right and exercising and I lost 130 lbs. I also found out the firing made me deeply depressed, I started going to therapy and I found out I'm bipolar depressive.

    I know at the end of the day I need a nursing job or a sign from God/hiring manager that would give me a chance. What I don't want is to give off the impression that I've only spent this time away from nursing sitting on my hands.
  6. by   beekee
    Quote from AesthesiaSeeker
    I like this, I really do, and I know at the end of the day that's all that counts.

    But these past 18 months have really been hell. My sister developed a drug problem and my parents wanted me home to help take care of her. I started eating right and exercising and I lost 130 lbs. I also found out the firing made me deeply depressed, I started going to therapy and I found out I'm bipolar depressive.

    I know at the end of the day I need a nursing job or a sign from God/hiring manager that would give me a chance. What I don't want is to give off the impression that I've only spent this time away from nursing sitting on my hands.
    "I had personal (family, health) issues that prevented me from working. However, those issues have been completely resolved and I am ready to return to nursing." I'd probably vaguely use the ill relative/sister story (without getting into any details). You can discuss how this personal issue deepened your empathy for patients and their loved ones as they go through such a trying time and, therefore, you will be a better nurse. It probably wouldn't hurt to add that this experience with your ill relative also made you realize how important it is to practice self care. In this time off, you also developed much better coping mechanisms for dealing with the day-to-day stress of nursing. Losing that much weight is a huge accomplishment.
  7. by   AesthesiaSeeker
    Thank you for the post @beekee, I really appreciate the advice. I've actually used a lot of what you wrote as a pitch to employers who ask me about my work gap!
  8. by   KelRN215
    Quote from AesthesiaSeeker
    Will new grad residencies only hire new grads?
    Forgive me for being blunt but yes, that's why they're called new grad residencies. The fact that you graduated over 2 years ago and worked as a nurse for 9 months makes you not a new grad.

    I agree with beekee. You may need to settle for a less than desirable employer for the time being to get your experience/skills back up. PDN agencies usually hire anyone with a pulse and a nursing license.

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