GN permit for a new grad

  1. So I posted this over in the PCT section (since that's my current title) but after nearly 200 views and not a single response, I figured I would try my luck over here!

    Hey guys and gals, quick question. I graduate in December from an ADN program, and am currently working as a PCT at a hospital here in Texas. My manager said she has to wait to hire me on as a new nurse until I pass my NCLEX-RN, but the TX BON states that after graduation you are issued a GN permit to practice nursing until you take the NCLEX (or 75 days, whichever comes first). The job description for Nurse Clinician 1 here at my hospital says it requires a GN/RN. Should I bring this up? Should I wait it out and keep PCTing even though I have a GN permit? Should I start looking at other units or even different hospitals?
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    About Daking0825

    Joined: Aug '16; Posts: 4; Likes: 2

    6 Comments

  3. by   Rose_Queen
    The GN is a bit of a relic from the days of having to wait months for board results that were offered only twice a year. Many facilities have moved away from hiring GNs because if they hire someone who then doesn't pass, that person has to be fired or demoted because they can no longer fill the role of a nurse. It's a safety thing for the facility. Just because the BIN offers the option of GN doesn't mean a facility has to accept it. It could be the job posting is simply a template that hasn't been updated.
  4. by   Daking0825
    I understand that, but don't nursing students typically start applying (and are then subsequently hired) shortly before their last semester ends?
  5. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from Daking0825
    I understand that, but don't nursing students typically start applying (and are then subsequently hired) shortly before their last semester ends?
    Not in many job markets anymore. With many areas seeing a glut of new grads, hospitals can be choosy about what qualifications they will consider. For a lot of areas, that means a full RN license and sometimes even a BSN. All others need not apply is the unsaid rule.
  6. by   babyNP.
    Quote from Daking0825
    I understand that, but don't nursing students typically start applying (and are then subsequently hired) shortly before their last semester ends?
    Residencies are offered in specialized areas of nursing that are often hired in advance. I was hired in February for a residency, graduated in June, and started in August. Got my RN license in July. Although this was 8 years ago, my hospital at the time (an academic center) utilized this practice for the following years. They had rolling residencies a few times a year.
  7. by   RunnerRN2015
    Quote from Daking0825
    I understand that, but don't nursing students typically start applying (and are then subsequently hired) shortly before their last semester ends?
    I graduated in Dec 2014. We started the interview process with HR (my school is affiliated with a large healthcare system) early on in our last semester. A large majority of my class had jobs lined up by early-mid November. I passed NCLEX in Jan 2015 and started on my unit the next month.
  8. by   malenurse69
    Quote from babyNP.
    Residencies are offered in specialized areas of nursing that are often hired in advance. I was hired in February for a residency, graduated in June, and started in August. Got my RN license in July. Although this was 8 years ago, my hospital at the time (an academic center) utilized this practice for the following years. They had rolling residencies a few times a year.
    Ditto. Applied places in January, got an offer in March, graduated in May, passed boards August 1st, starting orientation August 22nd. My institution usually turns away new graduates who apply for ICU unless you stand out in someway from the others (GPA etc..) I am glad I busted my butt in school, I'll just leave it at that

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