New Yorker looking to attend nursing school in The Philippines - page 3

Hi Everyone, I am hoping I can get some advice and someone can help me. I am an American of Filipino heritage (my parents are Ilocano and Visayan) I was born in Davao but came to the US when I was... Read More

  1. by   Hushdawg
    Top Nursing Schools for June 2009

    Based on June 2009 Nurse Board Exam Results, the top nursing schools are:

    100 and more examinees
    Rank Nursing School Total Number of Examinees Total Number of Passed Percentage Passed 1 SAINT PAUL UNIVERSITY-DUMAGUETE 112 112 100% 2 CHINESE GENERAL HOSPITAL COLLEGE OF NURSING & LIBERAL ARTS 198 196 99%
    SAINT LOUIS UNIVERSITY 303 299 99%
    TRINITY UNIVERSITY OF ASIA (TRINITY-QC) 393 390 99%
    UNIVERSITY OF SANTO TOMAS 479 472 99%
    WEST VISAYAS STATE UNIVERSITY-LA PAZ 150 149 99% 3 UNIVERSITY OF THE EAST RAMON MAGSAYSAY MEM. MEDICAL CTR. 319 313 98%

    30 to 99 examinees
    Rank Nursing School Total Number of Examinees Total Number of Passed Percentage Passed 1 UNIVERSITY OF THE PHILIPPINES-MANILA 61 61 100% 2 PHILIPPINE CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY-MANILA 36 32 89% 3 SAINT PAUL UNIVERSITY-QUEZON CITY 59 51 86%
    For example...

    The total rankings for November 2008 Exam is here: http://www.prc.gov.ph/documents/NURS1108ps.pdf

    Total rankings for June of 2009 Exam: http://www.prc.gov.ph/documents/NURS0609ps.pdf
  2. by   Hushdawg
    Quote from NurseCubanitaRN2b
    In all fairness regarding passing rate for foreign grads as 50%, I believe part of it is the language barrier. English isn't their first language in most cases so it's harder for them. I don't care if your education was done in English. Just because your books were in English doesn't mean that English was 100% spoken all the time. I'm sure there were the few exceptions.
    This doesn't really apply to the Philippines.

    English is a secondary language for this country.
    One of the reasons it has been taking so long for me to learn Tagalog (and why some foreigners living here never learn a single word) is because you can conduct business and life perfectly fine in English.
    For city-dwelling Pinoys, English can very well be a first language since it has been taught in the schools here starting in first grade ever since America invaded the Islands in the late 1800s.

    English Only Policies in workplaces and many schools actually penalize those who speak in any other language, some in severe ways.

    So the lack of English is why Korean, Indian and Vietnamese nurses are not passing NCLEX well; but not Pinoys.

    Actually, if you speak to most of the nurses taking NCLEX here from Manila as frequently as I do you'd swear that English WAS their first language!
  3. by   Hushdawg
    Quote from NurseCubanitaRN2b
    In all fairness regarding passing rate for foreign grads as 50%, I believe part of it is the language barrier.
    Just to debunk this myth once and for all...

    Look at the 2006 data for NCLEX where the international nurses are broken down country by country.

    That year the Philippines had a passing rate of 58.5%

    The UK passing rate was 60%
    Ireland was 62.5%
    New Zealand was 61.5

    China was 65.5%
    Chinese Nursing schools do not educate in English.

    I think it is finally fair to say that English is not as big a factor as some would think.

    Data source: https://www.ncsbn.org/08_2006_LicExa..._MW%281%29.pdf
    Pages 31 - 35


    By the way...

    New Hampshire's passing rate was only 60% that year
    DC's was only 55%

    So can we finally just say that an NCLEX-passing Licensed RN is the same no matter where he or she may come from?
  4. by   Ginger's Mom
    When I look at that report, I see DC 85.7% and NH 88.9% for the total year, I believe you are looking at quarterly reports not the annual numbers. See page 30.
  5. by   Hushdawg
    Quote from MedSurg32RN
    When I look at that report, I see DC 85.7% and NH 88.9% for the total year, I believe you are looking at quarterly reports not the annual numbers. See page 30.
    Absolutely right. My mistake.

    However, when you look at the US territories I think you'll see a trend mirroring international nurses. Bear in mind that residents of US territories are treated as US citizens and don't get put under the same scrutiny as foreign nurses.

    My point still stands though since foreign nurses from English-Speaking nations don't seem to fare much better in NCLEX passing rate as those from anywhere else.
  6. by   Ginger's Mom
    Quote from Hushdawg
    Absolutely right. My mistake.

    However, when you look at the US territories I think you'll see a trend mirroring international nurses. Bear in mind that residents of US territories are treated as US citizens and don't get put under the same scrutiny as foreign nurses.

    My point still stands though since foreign nurses from English-Speaking nations don't seem to fare much better in NCLEX passing rate as those from anywhere else.
    The UK and other English Speaking nursing programs don't mirror US curriculum, this makes these English Speaking nurses at a disadvantage taking a US based exam. My understanding is that the Philippine nursing schools mirror US programs.

    The NCLEX is not the sole indicator of making a successful nurse. The nurses clinical experiences during school, the experience of their clinical instructors, and the resources the program has all help to shape a nurse. In my opinion, nurses who wish to practice nursing should go to school in the country they wish to practice. That is a tried and true recipe for success.
  7. by   Hushdawg
    Quote from MedSurg32RN
    The NCLEX is not the sole indicator of making a successful nurse.
    Then why do so many people on here (present company included) point to the low-NCLEX passing rate as an indicator of poor-quality nursing?

    The top-level Philippine nursing schools prepare nurses just as well as US schools do.

    The OP may have challenges in licensure and endorsement for his career but he will also get the chance to have a high quality education for a fraction of the cost that he would have to pay in the USA for a BSN.

    If you want to argue that some nursing schools in RPH need to be shut down.. hey, I'm on your side for that one. But don't throw the baby out with the bath water.
  8. by   rn4ever?
    I think that so much has already been said about the alleged decline of the quality of the Nursing education in the Philippines. I still think that it's hard to generalize because one's success is still dependent on the person if he wants to do well or not in school and also on the choices he makes. Also, other people's opinions regarding the alleged decline of the quality of the Nursing education in the Philippines cannot be really considered as valid because they themselves didn't experience it. They just read about it somewhere or someone just told someone about it and it was relayed to them.
    The OP is deciding whether or not to pursue his Nursing education in the Philippines. That said, I believe that it would be helpful to post your story if you are either: someone who studied BSN in the Philippines fairly recently and had a real hard time having your documents evaluated and/or was unable to work in the US because your school documents were questionable, or you are someone who studied BSN in the Philippines fairly recently and was able to have your school documents evaluated without issues and/or was able to work in the US as an RN.
  9. by   Ginger's Mom
    Quote from Hushdawg
    Then why do so many people on here (present company included) point to the low-NCLEX passing rate as an indicator of poor-quality nursing?

    The top-level Philippine nursing schools prepare nurses just as well as US schools do.

    The OP may have challenges in licensure and endorsement for his career but he will also get the chance to have a high quality education for a fraction of the cost that he would have to pay in the USA for a BSN.

    If you want to argue that some nursing schools in RPH need to be shut down.. hey, I'm on your side for that one. But don't throw the baby out with the bath water.

    NCLEX is the bare bone basic for one to be licensed at as nurse. It is one metric ( of many metrics) to determine the success of a school.

    Agencies like the NLN, State Board Of Nursing, and The Sigma Theta Tau International judge the qualities of a nursing program. Also colleges have to have an overall accredition through their regional accrediation body.
  10. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from MedSurg32RN
    The Sigma Theta Tau International judge the qualities of a nursing program.
    Where did you get this information? STTI Honor Society of Nursing doesn't even have chapters in colleges that only offer the ADN programs. I am an STTI Lambda Chapter member but I am the first to say that this organization is "elitist" and only has chapters in BSN-granting institutions in the US and internationally. STTI is NOT an accrediting board although they do give awards to certain chapters based in nursing schools for exemplary performance. It would be a good marketing tool for some Philippine nursing schools to seek chapter approval for STTI though.
  11. by   Ginger's Mom
    Quote from NP Gilly
    Where did you get this information? STTI Honor Society of Nursing doesn't even have chapters in colleges that only offer the ADN programs. I am an STTI Lambda Chapter member but I am the first to say that this organization is "elitist" and only has chapters in BSN-granting institutions in the US and internationally. STTI is NOT an accrediting board although they do give awards to certain chapters based in nursing schools for exemplary performance. It would be a good marketing tool for some Philippine nursing schools to seek chapter approval for STTI though.
    I never said STTI is an ADN program, to me it is a sign of quality of nursing education where the College or University is vest in quality. I never said it was an accrediting body but a sign that the institution is looking at nursing issues and qualifies for membership. And I agree that is would be good for any college or university to join.
  12. by   Hushdawg
    It would also be nice if someone in the government here with two brain cells to rub together would overturn the crooked Judgement that CHED is not permitted to shut down unlicensed and under-performing schools and review centers! That would eliminate most of the debates that we have to deal with in these forums!
    It would mean that roughly half of the current annual nurse numbers would be produced and then we'd see the overall test scores slowly rising across the board.
    It's GOOD for the economy of the Philippines to weed out these waste-bin schools!
    Think about it, higher standards for entrance exams mean that those who can't cut it in Nursing will be spending money for other preparation courses and actually getting the investment aspect of education instead of WASTING so much money on these poorly performing schools only to end up with an education you cannot use since you are failing the board exams over and over again.

    I'd also like it if the NCLEX task force would do more than just make sure the NCLEX logo is used properly. Seems that if NCSBN and Pearson Vue are going to set up an NCELX task force internationally that they would at least have evaluation standards for NCLEX review schools. Sheesh.

    Bottom Line is that since there is no real government or reputable private institution which is doing full nursing school evaluations the prospective nurse must do a lot more research on his or her own to make sure that the school being chosen is a quality center.

    There are MANY schools here in the Philippines which can produce nurses that out-perform the average nurse from elsewhere (even US-Educated) because they have established reputations and understand the value of maintaining high quality standards with no compromise. (Hence, you will find many foreigners attending these schools)

    Unfortunately the rest of the schools are creating such a bad reputation for Pinoy nursing as a whole. That the good name of Pinoy nurses that was made through the 1990s is now being run into the dirt.

    Something's gotta give.
  13. by   JADAYU
    Quote from caringnursenj
    I don't think that being a foreign graduate alone can be a problem by itself. There was a "mass exodus" of Filipino Nurses to the US during the 60s-90s, and most of these nurses are still actively working as RNs in the US and have been successful in their field. Some have become Nurse Managers, Charge Nurses, or Nurse Practitioners---to name only a few positions they have held. And oh yes, they are foreign graduates and will always be considered as such. I think a problem could arise though if one enrolls himself in a nursing program (whether in the US or abroad) that is not duly-recognized and legitimate.
    yes it does not matter, because when I volunteered at a hospital here in my state, I met a RN who studied in the Province she is now making 100K as an RN here in the states. Also my pediatric doctor got her doctorates degree in Manila, she is recognized as one of the best pediatrics in our state. And she even recommends that it is a good idea to study in the Philippines but she recommends that I should attend a college that is known in the Philippines which will make things easier. She even told me that some of her friends that are nurses are going back to the Philippines to further their education and will return to the U.S. because she said it is possible. Really, guys...if you are from the U.S. and know how to speak english the NCLEX shouldn't be a problem because you can get study guides from the U.S. in fact you have more advantage because you can speak and understand english. I really don't know why some people are looking down at Fil-Ams who study nursing in the U.S. It is true that you will be know as an international trained nurse but there will also be more training once you get hired. And there will be nurse shortage in the future due to the babyboomers who will be retiring, so it should be even more easier to get a job in the U.S. as long as you meet the requirements.

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