University vs Community College employment - page 2

How do my fellow nurse educators feel about CC vs University employment? I am a new graduate and have been offered a job at both. I am weighing my options but wanted to reach out for more advice. ... Read More

  1. by   OncallRN
    Quote from jlcole45
    In the US you have to earn your RN and have work experience before
    going on for a graduate degree. I don't think there are many (if any) creditable US nursing schools that would accept someone into their MSN program without a RN license and clinical experience.

    And there is no SIMIPLE way of doing it. You start at the bottom and work your way up. First an RN w/BSN or other bachelors degree, then MSN, and later a PhD or DPN, if desired. It takes years. So no, there is no SIMPLE way of doing. If she is looking for a simple way, then she better look elsewhere because nursing is anything but simple.

    To be frank, I am a bit insulted that you would think there could be a simple way. Just thinking that shows that neither one of you really understands what it takes to be a nurse. So I will offer this advice.

    I would suggest, very strongly, that your niece go work as a nursing assistant, so she can see the realities of being a nurse - then she can make an informed decision.

    there are MANY entry level MSN program, mainly for people with a non nursing BS/BA. one obtains a BSN in the first year or so then completes the MSN portion in the next 2 years.
  2. by   VickyRN
    I wrote about my experiences here: https://allnurses.com/nursing-articl...us-255197.html

    However, this is just one community college ADN program and one large university BSN program. Only of anecdotal value. The workload in the community college ADN program nearly killed me. The workload in the university BSN program is much more reasonable.
  3. by   marachne
    Quote from OncallRN
    there are MANY entry level MSN program, mainly for people with a non nursing BS/BA. one obtains a BSN in the first year or so then completes the MSN portion in the next 2 years.
    And there are a number of BS to PhD programs now as well, with some people going directly to a PhD after earning their BSN (although many are returning BSN students). I believe some of the DNP programs may plan on having a direct, BS to DNP program too. No matter what, I do think it is very difficult to teach w/credibility w/o at least some clinical experience.
  4. by   dorimar
    Zambroski.pdf

    here is a really good article discussing the differences between the two (if i was able to attach it correctly).

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