Experience and the best way to enter

  1. How much experience did you have when you began teaching? What was your background?

    What do you feel is the best way to enter education? Would you recommend starting out as a clinical instructor and then do classroom education, or jump right in?

    Thanks! My goal has been to become an educator, and has been for a while. I'm about to enter the RN-BSN program at a college here in state, which makes my goal much more reachable, since I would be able to to teach on the ADN level here. Now I am starting to doubt myself and my ability and knowledge, and am wondering if I am meant to do this. I still want to, but I am just losing confidence. Being a school nurse is certainly helping, since I am starting to do some lesson plans and some time in the classroom speaking with students as well as doing presentations. I've also done some presentations for staff, which made me *very* nervous (teaching teachers- these folks do this 180 days a year!), and was told by several of them I did a great job, didn't ramble, got the point across efficiently.
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  2. Visit Aneroo profile page

    About Aneroo

    Joined: Feb '04; Posts: 1,782; Likes: 617
    from US
    Specialty: Cath Lab, OR, CPHN/SN, ER

    4 Comments

  3. by   nursebrandie28
    I have started as clinical and worked my in to full time. It has made the transition easier, but not necassary. Plus, when looking for a full time, it is easier to get on if your foot is in the door!!

    Brandie
  4. by   Ginger's Mom
    Quote from Aneroo
    How much experience did you have when you began teaching? What was your background?

    What do you feel is the best way to enter education? Would you recommend starting out as a clinical instructor and then do classroom education, or jump right in?

    Thanks! My goal has been to become an educator, and has been for a while. I'm about to enter the RN-BSN program at a college here in state, which makes my goal much more reachable, since I would be able to to teach on the ADN level here. Now I am starting to doubt myself and my ability and knowledge, and am wondering if I am meant to do this. I still want to, but I am just losing confidence. Being a school nurse is certainly helping, since I am starting to do some lesson plans and some time in the classroom speaking with students as well as doing presentations. I've also done some presentations for staff, which made me *very* nervous (teaching teachers- these folks do this 180 days a year!), and was told by several of them I did a great job, didn't ramble, got the point across efficiently.
    In my state of Mass, you need a MSN, but a BSN is a great start. I have a diploma, a BS , but recently got a MSN. Don't teaching fulltime since this would mean a pay cut.

    In the mean time a great start is putting together an inservice that gives CEUs, become a BLS instructor, and teach every opportunity you get,
  5. by   Aneroo
    Quote from Alexk49
    In my state of Mass, you need a MSN, but a BSN is a great start. I have a diploma, a BS , but recently got a MSN. Don't teaching fulltime since this would mean a pay cut.

    In the mean time a great start is putting together an inservice that gives CEUs, become a BLS instructor, and teach every opportunity you get,
    Eh- I work public health through local govt. I don't get paid much anyways. LOL

    Thanks for the replies!
  6. by   VickyRN
    When I started teaching nursing in one of the community colleges in NC (ADN program), I had a BSN and 6 years varied experience (med-surg, L & D, newborn, cardiac ICU). Since then, I have obtained my MSN-Nursing Education, and am now working on my PhD in nursing. If your heart's in it, go for it! We need fresh young nurse educators! A lot of the "oldies" are about to retire!

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