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Nursing Classroom Education: The big bang of powerpoint slavery

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guest042302019 is a BSN, RN and specializes in Progressive, Intermediate Care, and Stepdown.

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You are reading page 5 of Nursing Classroom Education: The big bang of powerpoint slavery. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

A&Ox6 has 2 years experience.

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I'm a senior nursing student, but I tutor first semester students as well. I currently tutor in dosage calculations, but I have also done individual and group fundamentals review as well as teaching students techniques for building great care plans.

I have seen that with dosage calculation, it's best to teach with things they know. Since these students haven't dealt with IVs and IM/SQ reconstitution... I give examples in regular life and then show them that it's the same problem. For example, if I'm tutoring someone who has kids or little siblings, I use formula to teach reconstitution. They know formula, so they can see that 2 oz water makes a bottle with 2.5 oz formula for example with a new strength. I also use formula to teach calculating TPN/enteral nutrition.

I use baking cakes to teach conversion. For example, this is the recipe, but you only have a teaspoon or you only have a shot glass. Rewrite the recipe. Tell them their friend from _______ country has a baby and says baby weighs ____ kg, how big is baby in lbs.

I find that students want to learn, and teaching students so that they can understand is the best way to ENGAGE them.

As a side note, I've noticed that many students who have difficulty with care plans or nursing process were never taught how it works. Sure they were told to buy a NANDA I or a care plan book, but so many of them don't realize that they shouldn't be making things up. The nursing model follows the patients' manifestations, not what they should present with since they have a certain dx in their chart. Of course it doesn't help when professors want students to write their care plans without seeing the patient. It also is unhelpful when professors make up dxs.

The best advice I got from my professors and that I give to my students is to buy a nursing dx book (not NANDA I) and to practice 5th grade math before starting the program.

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Get used to it, when you are a nurse you will get 3 hours of annual ed on computer via powerpoint and short quiz, then if you are really lucky, you get to go to in house education, where people with MSN and Phd will read a power point to you. I have my BSN, I know there are other forms of education out there, not sure why nursing professionals with advanced degrees are so lazy.

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Rose_Queen is a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

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Get used to it, when you are a nurse you will get 3 hours of annual ed on computer via powerpoint and short quiz, then if you are really lucky, you get to go to in house education, where people with MSN and Phd will read a power point to you. I have my BSN, I know there are other forms of education out there, not sure why nursing professionals with advanced degrees are so lazy.

Or is it that nursing educators, including those in staff education, are stretched far too thin? I am responsible for over 500 people- completion of orientation (average number of people on orientation at a time is 15-20 scattered over 3 separate hospitals in 15 different departments), annual and quarterly competency validation (which has to be done 1 on 1), being a resource for other departments that use our ORs and need to know what can and can't be done/how to work within the OR environment, maintaining all the paperwork that goes along with orientation and competency, providing staff education monthly, lining up education from outside vendors, maintaining and updating all of the policies for the department, working with student surgical technologists and student nurses and medical students on how to not contaminate sterile fields/how to scrub/how to prep/how to walk around, and so much more.

It's not laziness to utilize PowerPoint as a tool- it's a decent way that hits the most staff and can be done in the limited/non-existent time that I as an educator have to work with.

Want to change it? Advocate for your staff educators to get the supplies and time that they need. I need at least another full time educator, some updated training supplies for staff to practice with (I'm pretty sure several of our supplies are older than I am). But don't dare think that PowerPoints are used just because educators are lazy. I'd say your username is quite appropriate there.

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As a student, I hate 'death by PowerPoint' as much as the next person. I also desire to be challenged and engaged in the classroom. But now on the flip side as an adjunct instructor I also understand more of how the nursing education world works. Reality is that students learn differently, many haven't read or understood the material prior to lecture. In addition we have to ensure consistent presentation of standardized material across multiple sections of a course. Also, developing your "own" material takes considerable prep time, often over multiple semesters, and is made more difficult when instructors are bounced from course to course.

So, yes, I love teaching, and like most instructors I would like students to find my class to be worthwhile and interesting. Maybe one day you will become the entertaining instructor you wish that you had. But you will also understand the multiple challenges and pressures involved in educating nursing students.

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dudette10 has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN.

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I am a new instructor, and there are a number of issues. The first is the amount of content that schools expect us to teach. It's ridiculous. So many of my colleagues agree. I'm now on our curriculum committee with these same colleagues, and we are committed to making a change.

I usually teach a class where I can control the content, unlike most of the classes in our current curriculum. I love it. I have finally gotten my class to the point where students realize they MUST do the reading beforehand to participate fully in the classroom and actually learn something. I haven't completely flipped the classroom, but it is definitely a mixed classroom (the term for the lecture/active learning activity combo). I feel good about it, they are engaged, and they have shown me, through formative "quizzes," that they are learning too.

The content creep MUST be addressed for every classroom to be an active one. That takes a lot of hard work via curriculum development and talking the frightened instructors who don't know how to create an active learning classroom off the ledge.

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