PDN... did I commit career suicide - page 2

I started working as a private duty nurse in nursing school. I continued to work in the field for years (loved having the flexibility to set my own hours).Now I am wishing/wondering if I have done a... Read More

  1. by   AshAveAinRhy
    Ummmm. I started when I got my LPN.....so as I continued to go to school to get my RN I was working as a PDN. So yeah I WAS in Nursing school working as a PDN. How does your comment help anything
  2. by   AshAveAinRhy
    Quote from Leader25
    Years ago someone told me "never work just for insurance" ,there was insurance thru ANA etc, look into it.Good luck.

    Yeah that sounds nice lol....but being self employed means insurance through the "affordable" Obamacare. Its more than $1200 per month for my family of 4. I just had twins and haven't put them on the insurance but I am sure its outrageous
  3. by   KelRN215
    Quote from AshAveAinRhy
    Ummmm. I started when I got my LPN.....so as I continued to go to school to get my RN I was working as a PDN. So yeah I WAS in Nursing school working as a PDN. How does your comment help anything
    Well, it's an important distinction to say I started working as an LPN in private duty nursing while bridging to my RN vs saying I worked as a PDN while in nursing school. The latter statement is vague and, if I were a hiring manager and saw something like this in a cover letter or heard it in an interview as you phrased it in your OP, I'd assume you were either A) lying or B) had done something illegal and would pass you over as a potential candidate. So make sure you are being clear with your applications to these hospital jobs.
  4. by   lmichelle25
    I would also add to have confidence in your abilities as a nurse and if you are interviewing with a prospective hospital, then make sure to talk about all the qualities you bring to the table. Maybe you don't have floor experience, but orientation and training will help with that. You obviously have patience, dedication, and follow through to be your own boss and travel an hour or more to and from your patients for more than a decade and a half! That's impressive! Also, I know LTC has been mentioned, what about a home health ageny if you enjoy the automony and one on one patient care WITH insurance benefits? Just a thought. You have marketable skills and options, so don't feel limited or less than capable of anything! Good luck!!
  5. by   cwilson9666
    Wow you are selling yourself short. In a private duty setting you have no back up and yes, the pace is slower but you have no one to remind you about anything if thing go south. You have learned a routine, managed the family without issue, given meds, cleaned and cared for trachs in an adult or child. Kept vent at a conducive rate. Managed vitals, fed patient, changed bed and patient, bathed patient, taught the family and the patient about the disease process and the meds given and why some were changed and why some stayed. Charted all this so your company that you are 1099ed to was able to bill and get paid without redoing all your notes, etc. You are far more independent than you think. In a facility, you work as a team and if you forget something most of the time someone will help you or at least remind you....sometimes. I read some of the suggestions that you were given and I liked the one on a long term facility, mainly for the reasons that were mentioned. However, you can do that PRN and not get into the gossip circle. I learned more than any of my classmates by signing up with 5 placement agencies. I was kept busy. I never worked less than 40 hours unless I decided to. I was placed in homes, facilities, respite for hospice, Jail/prison, long term care, independent living, locked units for memory care, flu clinics, walk in clinics, blood units for test ordered and drug test ordered, I worked ER and the floor of most of the hospitals close to me and I always got called back. I loved the fact I was learning how to assist pap smears, run EKG's, use my emergency care on knife wounds, give TB, hep B and most immunizations to children and boosters for adults. Isolate for Staph or MRSA, assess patient and run test as needed then following protocol sheet give meds for treatment for what I believed to be the issue. (A staff PA would sign off on my diagnosis and txmt plan bi-wkly) In hospice, since I am not an RN, I followed the Txmt plan. However, if a patient fell or took a turn for the worse. I had standing orders to make the patient comfortable with first aid, pain meds, O2, or anything deemed necessary for the patient and their disease. I learned this so well most of the time no RN, Social Worker or anyone else was needed for me to calm the family. Get the patient out of distress and on the road to a better day and night. I med with all staff for an IDT meeting to bring everyone up to speed and if I had to improvise with bandages or order more meds for pain and nausea.....Our on Staff MD would sign orders as completed on patient per need and/or protocol.


    I am a Licensed Practical Nurse and I have had lots of experience in most of the areas they will allow a LPN to work. You have not messed up at all, you took a different route and you are not pigeon holed into only one type of nursing. Believe me, I can get a job when some of my friends can not. I listened and I learned. I went where I could and challenged myself. You have too. It has just become second nature to you and you forgot to break down all the skills you have acquired over the past few years. Emergency and ICU are good to have on your resume but so are other types of trauma that you cared for alone, before anyone else took over. Good Luck and I hope you find your way.....Your path must be your own not anyone else's.
  6. by   AshAveAinRhy
    Quote from cwilson9666
    Wow you are selling yourself short. In a private duty setting you have no back up and yes, the pace is slower but you have no one to remind you about anything if thing go south. You have learned a routine, managed the family without issue, given meds, cleaned and cared for trachs in an adult or child. Kept vent at a conducive rate. Managed vitals, fed patient, changed bed and patient, bathed patient, taught the family and the patient about the disease process and the meds given and why some were changed and why some stayed. Charted all this so your company that you are 1099ed to was able to bill and get paid without redoing all your notes, etc. You are far more independent than you think. In a facility, you work as a team and if you forget something most of the time someone will help you or at least remind you....sometimes. I read some of the suggestions that you were given and I liked the one on a long term facility, mainly for the reasons that were mentioned. However, you can do that PRN and not get into the gossip circle. I learned more than any of my classmates by signing up with 5 placement agencies. I was kept busy. I never worked less than 40 hours unless I decided to. I was placed in homes, facilities, respite for hospice, Jail/prison, long term care, independent living, locked units for memory care, flu clinics, walk in clinics, blood units for test ordered and drug test ordered, I worked ER and the floor of most of the hospitals close to me and I always got called back. I loved the fact I was learning how to assist pap smears, run EKG's, use my emergency care on knife wounds, give TB, hep B and most immunizations to children and boosters for adults. Isolate for Staph or MRSA, assess patient and run test as needed then following protocol sheet give meds for treatment for what I believed to be the issue. (A staff PA would sign off on my diagnosis and txmt plan bi-wkly) In hospice, since I am not an RN, I followed the Txmt plan. However, if a patient fell or took a turn for the worse. I had standing orders to make the patient comfortable with first aid, pain meds, O2, or anything deemed necessary for the patient and their disease. I learned this so well most of the time no RN, Social Worker or anyone else was needed for me to calm the family. Get the patient out of distress and on the road to a better day and night. I med with all staff for an IDT meeting to bring everyone up to speed and if I had to improvise with bandages or order more meds for pain and nausea.....Our on Staff MD would sign orders as completed on patient per need and/or protocol.


    I am a Licensed Practical Nurse and I have had lots of experience in most of the areas they will allow a LPN to work. You have not messed up at all, you took a different route and you are not pigeon holed into only one type of nursing. Believe me, I can get a job when some of my friends can not. I listened and I learned. I went where I could and challenged myself. You have too. It has just become second nature to you and you forgot to break down all the skills you have acquired over the past few years. Emergency and ICU are good to have on your resume but so are other types of trauma that you cared for alone, before anyone else took over. Good Luck and I hope you find your way.....Your path must be your own not anyone else's.
    You literally have made my day. I def have been selling myself short and doubted myself and let fear of change rule my life. Thank you so much for taking the time to write all that because it has boosted my confidence and I feel like YES I could do it. Really, thank you so much. It has made my day

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