Nurse Executives

  1. I like to browse job openings at local hospitals to see whats out there regularly. I find it odd that there are ALWAYS job openings for upper management nursing positions. It makes me wonder if there are not many nurses that are interested in working at the executive level. I'd like to do a poll, just wondering about nurses that are interested in eventually moving into executive roles.
  2. Poll: Are you interested in working as an executive nurse?

    • Yes, I am interested

      21.28% 10
    • No, I am not interested

      78.72% 37
    47 Votes
  3. Visit remotefuse profile page

    About remotefuse, BSN, RN

    Joined: Mar '13; Posts: 160; Likes: 502

    23 Comments

  4. by   remotefuse
    Also, I'd like to add, in the several hospitals that I have worked, nurse directors and chief nursing officers usually have a pretty high turnover rate. Sometimes they are promoted, and very rarely, they are fired.
  5. by   blondy2061h
    I'm in a middle management position right now. I've been there for 2 years. I'm on my 3 boss. The previous 2 were fired. The position above me you loose union protection and it seems to be the first to go as soon as someone is unhappy. No thanks.
  6. by   amoLucia
    It's like in professional sports - when the team does badly, they fire the GM and head coach.
  7. by   JBMmom
    I know I started my MSN in management and executive leadership with a thought about what nurse management would be. When I got to the practicum portion of the program, I realized I didn't really know what the positions entail. Lots of meetings, little to no patient contact, mostly dealing with staffing issues. It was definitely not for me. I think it's a very different skill set from floor nursing and it will be a good fit for some, and not for others, just like many areas of nursing. I agree with others that there seems to be more scape-goating and turnover at these levels as well. It seems we're always seeing announcements about nurse managers coming and going in our health system.
  8. by   klone
    Being a nurse manager is a really hard, stressful, thankless job. You get **** from both sides. That's why there's such high turnover.

    one thing I've insisted on continuing is direct patient contact, even if it's just staring an IV or clearing a lunch tray and filling water. It helps me to remember the satisfaction and fulfillment that can be found in nursing.
  9. by   klone
    Quote from blondy2061h
    I'm in a middle management position right now. I've been there for 2 years. I'm on my 3 boss. The previous 2 were fired. The position above me you loose union protection and it seems to be the first to go as soon as someone is unhappy. No thanks.
    You're in a union? Is it the same union as the nurses?
  10. by   Davey Do
    Quote from remotefuse
    in the several hospitals that I have worked, nurse directors and chief nursing officers usually have a pretty high turnover rate.
    head-up-butt-

    Quote from remotefuse
    Sometimes they are promoted, and very rarely, they are fired.
    Perhaps the Peter Principle in effect?
  11. by   City-Girl
    It's an entirely different role. I'd rather be at the bedside than be wrapped up in institutional politics.
  12. by   blondy2061h
    Quote from klone
    You're in a union? Is it the same union as the nurses?
    Yep. At my facility up until vice president level you're in the same union, basically. Aids, secretaries, respiratory therapists are in a different union but every nurse is in the same one. It's a bizarre setup.
  13. by   ICUman
    What's the average salary for nurse managers or unit director? I know it varies by region of course but am curious of a ballpark figure.
    I have considered the idea of eventually going the management route.
  14. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from remotefuse
    Also, I'd like to add, in the several hospitals that I have worked, nurse directors and chief nursing officers usually have a pretty high turnover rate. Sometimes they are promoted, and very rarely, they are fired.
    I've seen many nurse executives fired, asked to resign, "laid off due to reorganization" or promoted to their level of incompetency. It seems to be a high risk job to me.
  15. by   amoLucia
    Quote from blondy2061h
    Yep. At my facility up until vice president level you're in the same union, basically. Aids, secretaries, respiratory therapists are in a different union but every nurse is in the same one. It's a bizarre setup.
    Is this a Civil Service position?

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