Non bedside nursing Option ... and a side question bout Nails?

  1. Im currently a ADN Nursing student and i work as a Tech. I hope to get my BSN soon after i finish my ADN. I've enjoyed our clinical so far, but i have a strange feeling i will not enjoy bed side nursing for very long after i graduated . So i have two question What are other great jobs that a Nurses can do (Non-Bedside) ? (To add to this i want to know so i can start looking at what education is require for non bedside jobs not that i don't want to bedside at all ) and the second one is, are there any line of Nursing or health career related jobs ( non patient care) that you can have acrylic nails? (Yes i know it may sound like a dumb question but, i just love having my nails done at least at my age, and i have a bad habit of bitting my nail which i don't do when they are done. I know i won't be able to right out of school more like a down the road option.) YES i understand infection control for the patient care part.
    Last edit by lovelyc on Jul 29
  2. Visit lovelyc profile page

    About lovelyc, CNA

    Joined: Jul '18; Posts: 6; Likes: 9

    39 Comments

  3. by   Been there,done that
    Wow. You have not graduated , but you are looking for 'Great" non- bedside jobs. Perhaps you are going for the wrong degree.
    There are no patient care positions that allow acrylic nails, they are not allowed for infection control reasons.
  4. by   lovelyc
    I Love taking care and helping people but i can tell i don't think i would not want to bed side the rest of my life. So in looking for Great non-bedside jobs I'm looking as to be able to go to school now while im young to get whatever education is needed not wait till I'm older and ready to change to go back to school.
  5. by   LovingLife123
    Do you have to wear acrylics? I get gel on my nails and you can't really bite them. They are kept short.

    As for great non-bedside jobs? Not right out of school. You will need to develop critical thinking skills which really comes with bedside experience.

    Focus on passing nursing school, and then nclex.
  6. by   City-Girl
    More and more out patient clinics seem to be hiring medical assistants (in my neck of the woods). Not sure what their education requirements are or what they get paid, but most of them seem to enjoy their jobs. Of course they still are not allowed to wear acrylic nails due to infection control practices.
  7. by   cleback
    Public health nursing, but they still may require experience and a bsn and you may not be able to wear fake nails if/when you provide patient care (vaccine clinics, home visits, etc.).

    Are you sure you want nursing? I honestly think you would do better in a job without patient care as the focus. Healthcare administration? Social work, maybe? Technologies that can be utilized in healthcare/population studies (software development, eg). You're young, and if you know you don't want to do bedside, it's not too late to go a different direction.
  8. by   Alex_RN
    Do you consider School Nursing bedside? I have friends that love it. There is a sub-board here you might find insightful.
  9. by   linda1959
    I am a school nurse and love it. But I also came to it in the second half of my career which meant I had 19 years of pediatric/adolescent experience under my belt. Now, I don't think someone needs 19 years of experience to be a school nurse, but to come in with no clinical background would be very tough. We practice almost independently, and you really have to have excellent assessment skills, critical thinking, and "people" skills to do the job well.

    If this is something the OP is interested in, your suggestion to drop in on the School Nursing board would give her great insight into what it entails.
  10. by   inthecosmos
    Really reconsider your major. If you're willing to be bedside for 5-10 years, then I would definitely recommend getting into it and discovering, for yourself, what non-clinical jobs exist.

    Management requires some ability to work on the floor still, at least at the bottom management level. It does not require a BSN or even a MSN in certain situations, but is definitely recommended. You'll need more than a few years experience to be a good leader, however. You're the floors back-up and if a staff member needs help with a patient, you need to be able to think critically and collaborate with people who look up to you for guidance.

    Educators still have to perform bedside nursing. Most educators who work in academic settings have a MSN and participate in clinicals (bedside nursing) often. They keep up their bedside nursing to be better educators.

    Other positions that are non-clinical require years of experience before you'll land them. If you don't think you can hack it now, I would definitely consider your options.
  11. by   KelRN215
    Quote from inthecosmos
    Really reconsider your major. If you're willing to be bedside for 5-10 years, then I would definitely recommend getting into it and discovering, for yourself, what non-clinical jobs exist.

    Management requires some ability to work on the floor still, at least at the bottom management level. It does not require a BSN or even a MSN in certain situations, but is definitely recommended. You'll need more than a few years experience to be a good leader, however. You're the floors back-up and if a staff member needs help with a patient, you need to be able to think critically and collaborate with people who look up to you for guidance.

    Educators still have to perform bedside nursing. Most educators who work in academic settings have a MSN and participate in clinicals (bedside nursing) often. They keep up their bedside nursing to be better educators.

    Other positions that are non-clinical require years of experience before you'll land them. If you don't think you can hack it now, I would definitely consider your options.
    Where do you work? When I worked in the hospital, my manager refused to help with patient care at all, didn't know how to use our EMR and didn't have access to the Pyxis. In no way was she "back-up" nor could she answer most clinical questions. That was our Clinical Nurse Specialist's role. Our educator also didn't do patient care. Manager jobs in this hospital required MSNs.
  12. by   K+MgSO4
    Quote from KelRN215
    Where do you work? When I worked in the hospital, my manager refused to help with patient care at all, didn't know how to use our EMR and didn't have access to the Pyxis. In no way was she "back-up" nor could she answer most clinical questions. That was our Clinical Nurse Specialist's role. Our educator also didn't do patient care. Manager jobs in this hospital required MSNs.
    I have an MHA and currently a NUM. I cover incharge shifts if someone calls in sick and no other person is available esp around grad programme rotation and the seniors are precepting.

    I am in the middle when the emergency buzzer goes off, facilitating family meetings, complex d/c planning etc. The first part of NUM is "nurse".
  13. by   BoriLPN3
    I can't believe all the responses telling someone to rethink their career choice just because they want to wear fake nails. How rude and mean!! I had fake nails when I worked as a floor nurse at a rehab center for many years. I just kept them short. I work at an assisted living facility now and I have very long fake nails. My boss has never said anything to me and I have been there for several years. I do not perform a lot of bedside care though. I think in the nursing profession it depends on where you work and the level of care you provide. Keep your nails and wear them with pride!
    Last edit by BoriLPN3 on Jul 30 : Reason: Spelling
  14. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from BoriLPN3
    I can't believe all the responses telling someone to rethink their career choice just because they want to wear fake nails. How rude and mean!! I had fake nails when I worked as a floor nurse at a rehab center for many years. I just kept them short. I work at an assisted living facility now and I have very long fake nails. My boss has never said anything to me and I have been there for several years. I do not perform a lot of bedside care though. I think in the nursing profession it depends on where you work and the level of care you provide. Keep your nails and wear them with pride!
    No. Just no. Fake nails have been linked to deaths. There is a reason many dress codes strictly forbid them. Bet if you looked at yours they aren't allowed, regardless of whether your manager polices it or not. As a nurse, you should take the higher road, follow the dress code, and follow infection control standards. The fact that you prefer to play fast and loose with infection control is concerning.

    Study Links Bacteria, Long Nails and Baby Deaths - The New York Times

close