Going back to school...but idk what for?

  1. Hi all!
    I currently a bedside nurse working on a neuro stepdown unit with my BSN. I unfortunately already feel burnt out with bedside nursing and am looking to go back to school to advance my career. I'm only 23 so I feel like the possibilities are endless. I always thought I would go back to get my DNP and work as an acute care or primary care NP but I'm leaning away from this as I don't know if I can do patient care the rest of my life. I love medicine and interacting with patients but I feel under appreciated and stressed most days. I've looked into going back to law school, getting MBA, or even med school. I was just curious on what other nurses opinions are on 1. Going back to school early in your career and 2. Going back to school for something not medical. I would love to hear any input! Thanks
    •  
  2. Visit Egesse profile page

    About Egesse

    Joined: Feb '17; Posts: 11; Likes: 2

    9 Comments

  3. by   Ruby Vee
    The time to spend the time and money on going back to school is when you've figured out exactly what you want to do with the education. If you haven't figured it out yet, going back to school is a waste of time and a great way to rack up more debt.

    That said, I was burned out early in my career - I was sure I hated nursing, wasn't meant to be at the bedside and that I'd be much happier with an MBA. I spent the time (and not all that much money, thankfully) getting an MBA only to figure out (about the time I graduated) that I was an Adrenalin junkie and really didn't want to leave the ICU. I don't regret the education - I was living in a small town near an Air Force Base, going through a divorce and it was probably the best thing I could have done with the time and the money at that point in my life. But having done it, and never used the MBA, I'd recommend figuring out what you want first.

    If you're looking for a career path with no stress and where people pat you on the back and appreciate you every day, I don't know what that would be. Doctors get burned out, and believe me they're not appreciated every day. Lawyers are pretty much universally hated and businesswomen don't have it easy, either. Yeah, the hours look good but it's not real flexible and the job security waxes and wanes. Nursing, especially at the bedside, has great job security, flexible hours and nurses are overall trusted and appreciated. As a nurse, you can work the hours that work best for your family. I know many nurses who have arranged their schedules opposite that of their partner so they never have to pay for child care. And some who have dropped out for several years to stay at home, who have drastically reduced their hours to have the best of both worlds, or who support their families while their husbands stay home. Lots of options that doctors, lawyers and businesswomen envy.

    If you hear me advocating for bedside nursing as a great career, you're hearing right.
  4. by   elkpark
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    The time to spend the time and money on going back to school is when you've figured out exactly what you want to do with the education. If you haven't figured it out yet, going back to school is a waste of time and a great way to rack up more debt.
    ^^ This.
  5. by   Sunshine54327
    Have you thought about teaching nursing classes or clinicals?
  6. by   Green Tea, RN
    I graduated from a nursing school 6 years ago, and I am planning to leave nursing for good in next three years. Unfortunately, nursing was not for me. I work part-time now and take classes at local school. I am hoping to earn a graduate degree in STEM. Taking classes can be stressful at times, but overall I enjoy learning. Also, becoming a part time nurse drastically improved my quality of life.
    I think if you don't know what you would like to do for schooling, you don't need to rush. Getting a degree requires money, time, energy, and commitment (if you graduated from a nursing school, you know ). I wanted to go back to school for a long time and saved enough money. Initially, I was thinking a nurse practitioner school, but i realized I no longer wanna work in healthcare anymore.
    Good luck!
    Last edit by Green Tea, RN on May 17 : Reason: Typo
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from Sunshine54327
    Have you thought about teaching nursing classes or clinicals?
    It always pains me when people post here that they are burned out on nursing and looking for an alternative and someone inevitably responds to suggest that they go into teaching nursing. Don't you think nursing students deserve, and need, instructors who are enthusiastic and positive and energetic about nursing, not people who are there because they are burned out on nursing and looking for a way out? Would you have been happy, as a nursing student, to have individuals with that perspective as your instructors? I would not have been. I would have felt that I was really being shortchanged by my school.
  8. by   caliotter3
    If you are burned out on doing bedside care, I suggest you don't choose medical school unless you have one excellent, productive vacation and an overhaul on your outlook. Medical school is daunting enough without approaching it from a burnt out mental and physical standpoint.
  9. by   llg
    Quote from Sunshine54327
    Have you thought about teaching nursing classes or clinicals?
    People who are burned out ... and/or who burned out early in their careers ... do not generally make the best teachers. The people who make the best teachers are the nurses who thrived as a staff nurse and are now ready to pass their expertise and love for staff nursing on to the next generation.
  10. by   Egesse
    Quote from llg
    People who are burned out ... and/or who burned out early in their careers ... do not generally make the best teachers. The people who make the best teachers are the nurses who thrived as a staff nurse and are now ready to pass their expertise and love for staff nursing on to the next generation.
    Stating I feel burnt out and actually being burnt out are two completely different things. I come to work extremely enthusiastic. I am super nice nice to staff and patients. I am also doing more for my patients that what's required. I'm not you're typically burnt out mean lazy nurse. I just want to advance my career and education past a bedside nurse. I'm not someone who can remain stagnant in my career.
  11. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Elkpark
    It always pains me when people post here that they are burned out on nursing and looking for an alternative and someone inevitably responds to suggest that they go into teaching nursing. Don't you think nursing students deserve, and need, instructors who are enthusiastic and positive and energetic about nursing, not people who are there because they are burned out on nursing and looking for a way out? Would you have been happy, as a nursing student, to have individuals with that perspective as your instructors? I would not have been. I would have felt that I was really being shortchanged by my school.
    Quote from llg
    People who are burned out ... and/or who burned out early in their careers ... do not generally make the best teachers. The people who make the best teachers are the nurses who thrived as a staff nurse and are now ready to pass their expertise and love for staff nursing on to the next generation.

    Two pieces of excellent advice and clear thinking.

    And then this:

    Quote from Egesse
    Stating I feel burnt out and actually being burnt out are two completely different things. I come to work extremely enthusiastic. I am super nice nice to staff and patients. I am also doing more for my patients that what's required. I'm not you're typically burnt out mean lazy nurse. I just want to advance my career and education past a bedside nurse. I'm not someone who can remain stagnant in my career.
    When you post on a nursing forum saying that you feel burnt out, you'll have to forgive us for assuming that what you really meant is that you feel burnt out. It is your assumption -- and yours only -- that actually BEING burnt out means you are unenthusiastic, mean and lazy. I'll have to respectfully disagree with that assumption. I also disagree with your assertion that remaining at the bedside equates with being "stagnant in my career". It seems that you're operating under a plethora of incorrect and insulting assumptions.

    Students deserve enthusiastic, energetic and expert teachers who can pass on their expertise and enthusiasm for bedside nursing to the next generation of nurses. That pretty much excludes someone who cannot cut it at the bedside and moves on under the guise of "not remaining stagnant at my career". Unless the OP suddenly discovers a wellspring of enthusiasm for and expertise at the bedside, I'd encourage her to give teaching a pass.

close