SHHHHH, dont tell anyone I'm a RN - page 6

For the past four years I have worked as a CNA putting myself through school and I can officially say I am a RN. However-a few months ago my manager told me that I had to tell him immeadiately after... Read More

  1. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from canoehead
    You may have passed your boards, but you can hold off on activating your RN license as long as you want. Tell him you are going to wait to pay your final dues so you can continue your present job.
    There are states where that happens? Mine requires all payment at time of application for licensure in order for the ATT to be sent, and then automatically issued the license upon passing NCLEX
  2. by   broughden
    Quote from elkpark
    Where did I (or anyone else on the thread) say anything about her owing "loyalty" to the employer? I simply expect her to conduct herself with honesty and integrity as a licensed professional, which she is not doing.

    One of the pieces of info most employers do disclose is whether or not the individual is eligible for rehire, and she can easily end up on the "do not rehire" list, even if the employer only finds out about her deception after she's gone, and that will follow her for years. It might create problems for her, it might not, but it will be there and she will never know when it might create a problem for her.
    Where?
    You and everyone else judging her for not complying with some supervisor at work, who hasnt shown her a written policy, for not being "honest" nor having "integrity".
    If there is no such written policy she doesnt actually have to tell her supervisor anything and it has nothing to do with her integrity or honesty.
    Some even laughingly called it a "lie of omission" LMAO. Are you kidding me?!?

    Based on that ridiculous assertion I completely lied my way into nursing school then and have no integrity.
    When they asked during the interview for us to talk about a time we failed or a "negative" personal character flaw we need to keep working on, do you think I brought up the my biggest career failure? Or my most heinous character flaw?
    Nope.

    When interview coaches told me to not mention my desire to ultimately pursue my DNP, because BSN admissions interviewers want to know we are focused on bedside nursing and just being a RN, guess what? I kept my mouth shut about my future DNP desires.

    Florida is an "at will" employment state. I can be fired for any reason or even no reason (unless protected by EEOC) so if my boss is a raging political conservative, when he asks what I did for the weekend (attended a women's right to choose rally) do you think Im going to be honest with him?
    Nope! Im going to lie my butt off and say "Not much."

    Edit- I've had employers ask in interviews about my social media accounts. If I have them, what the account names are so they can check them out, etc. Guess what I did? LIED! I wanted the job but simultaneously I dont think my employer needs to be monitoring my social media activity, so I lied and said I didnt use them.

    All of these are "lies of omission."
    Unless it involves patient safety or a specific written policy (thats not in violation of state or federal labor laws), we dont actually have to tell our bosses or employers ANYTHING. And claiming we do or that its some "lie of omission" is outright laughable.
    Last edit by broughden on Jul 9 : Reason: Spelling, added one point
  3. by   broughden
    Quote from JBudd
    1. It is called integrity: whether reciprocated or not. When you take a job, you agree to abide by the policies set by the people paying you.
    He hasnt shown her any such written policy despite her request that he do so.
    She isnt obligated to follow made up nonexistent policies.
  4. by   Ambersmom
    Its not an issue of them wanting to let you go because the tech would be leaving, many hospitals won't let you work as a tech or cna if you have your RN, the simple reason being liability. If something happens you are held to the highest level of training you've had, so even if you're working as a cna if a patient complains about a sx or you notice something you're held to the RN standard, you can't take the RN hat on and off at whim. Also if you're now an RN your facilities insurance will no longer cover you. Do the right thing for your facility and yourself and let them know you passed your boards, its not like they won't find out anyway.
  5. by   JudyB88
    The ethical dilemma is that you are not telling your manager, but only if the hospital policy says you must and IF hospital policy says you can not work under you actual degree. Don't guess, ask HR to see the policy. Maybe your manager doesn't actually know there is NOT a policy but rather this has been common practice. On another note, give a written resignation of the last date you can work before starting your next position and do it NOW. If they let you go before that, then you will definitely be eligible for unemployment and they get penalized for every approved unemployment case so doubt they would let you go before your last date. If there is a policy and you do not tell then they can let you go and not only will you have to answer yes to the question, "have you ever been terminated" but will not be eligible for unemployment. If that happens, just explain your dilemma to future employers, they will understand why you did what you did. Hopefully, a resignation letter with the truth that you passed will fill the gap of time before starting your new job, will let you celebrate your success with current co-workers and bring you peace of mind. I doubt you could be in danger of practicing out side your scope of practice since you have had no job training as an RN so would not be expected to handle those situation independently until you have a a good 6-12 weeks of orientation. BTY, what kind of place would not want you to stay as an RN, this whole thing says volumes about your current employer and why you are leaving. CONGRATS on becoming an RN!!!!
  6. by   Shanua
    It's routine for recent graduates who pass the NCLEX to work as a CNA or PCT until they start the nurse residency or move for a new job where I work. No one has a problem with it. I think hiding it may get you into trouble there though.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Barbie8808
    For the past four years I have worked as a CNA putting myself
    through school and I can officially say I am a RN. However-a few months ago my
    manager told me that I had to tell him immeadiately after passing my boards
    because I could not work for my organization as a tech if I'm a license nurse. I
    checked with my state BON and it says I can but I'm still avoiding him because I
    need my job. My nurse residency doesnt start for another month (at another
    location) and I still have bills to pay. Whats worst is that my co workers have
    been asking me, so I have been honest and tell them that I passed my boards but some of
    them have gone out of their way to question how do I still have a job as a
    tech where as the organization usually let techs go once they become nurses who
    are not staying with the company. I also wanted to stay with the
    same organization to earn some extra money prn because I'm sure I will not be
    eliegible for overtime for months at the new Hospital. I'm so confused right now because it's like I have to hide the fact I'm a nurse to justify my needs for survival.
    The honest thing to do would be to contact your manager immediately and tell him that you are now licensed. It is unlikely that he'll ask you to drop everything and leave immediately. In fact it is likely you'll be asked to work out the current schedule. At the very least, you can give 2-4 weeks notice. It's the professional thing to do.
  8. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from broughden
    Where?
    You and everyone else judging her for not complying with some supervisor at work, who hasnt shown her a written policy, for not being "honest" nor having "integrity".
    If there is no such written policy she doesnt actually have to tell her supervisor anything and it has nothing to do with her integrity or honesty.
    Some even laughingly called it a "lie of omission" LMAO. Are you kidding me?!?

    Based on that ridiculous assertion I completely lied my way into nursing school then and have no integrity.
    When they asked during the interview for us to talk about a time we failed or a "negative" personal character flaw we need to keep working on, do you think I brought up the my biggest career failure? Or my most heinous character flaw?
    Nope.

    When interview coaches told me to not mention my desire to ultimately pursue my DNP, because BSN admissions interviewers want to know we are focused on bedside nursing and just being a RN, guess what? I kept my mouth shut about my future DNP desires.

    Florida is an "at will" employment state. I can be fired for any reason or even no reason (unless protected by EEOC) so if my boss is a raging political conservative, when he asks what I did for the weekend (attended a women's right to choose rally) do you think Im going to be honest with him?
    Nope! Im going to lie my butt off and say "Not much."

    Edit- I've had employers ask in interviews about my social media accounts. If I have them, what the account names are so they can check them out, etc. Guess what I did? LIED! I wanted the job but simultaneously I dont think my employer needs to be monitoring my social media activity, so I lied and said I didnt use them.

    All of these are "lies of omission."

    Unless it involves patient safety or a specific written policy (thats not in violation of state or federal labor laws), we dont actually have to tell our bosses or employers ANYTHING. And claiming we do or that its some "lie of omission" is outright laughable.
    I am sorry to have to point out something so obvious, but if you are directly asked whether you have social media accounts and you lie that you do not, even though you do, that is not a "lie of omission." That's an out and out lie.
  9. by   broughden
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I am sorry to have to point out something so obvious, but if you are directly asked whether you have social media accounts and you lie that you do not, even though you do, that is not a "lie of omission." That's an out and out lie.
    And? I could care less. But thanks for that clarification.
  10. by   NurseBlaq
    OP what's the update?
  11. by   Lovekaylanicole
    I worked as a CNA throughout nursing school and for a few months after graduating while I was job hunting. I was honest with my employer and she knew as soon as I found a job as an RN, I'd be out of there. But, it was never questioned whether or not I could remain there having a higher degree.

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