Poor Manager

  1. I recently changed roles from management to a field RN....I felt the need to recontect with the reason I got into nursing. I interviewed and was given the position ny a DON who on the surface seemed awesome. Boy was I a fool. She continually brow beats the nursing staff. I have been there 90 days and 3 nurses hsve already quit. I am at that point. It's a great company nationally recognized. I feel like i should speak up but at what cost. Any advise?
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    About Pamgrayrn

    Joined: Mar '18; Posts: 1
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    2 Comments

  3. by   Neats
    Being a manager is hard work if you want to be a good one. Follow through is the hardest part of the job.
    If you have good relations with this DON I would respond to this nurse in a way that makes them think before they speak to me. There is an art to verbally speaking.
    You do not provide many specific although you say "browbeat" this means to intimidate, being stern, or arrogance.

    If my boss was talking to me in a stern manner I would stop and say... can I say something...what you just said... I am taking like you are angry with me, did I do something wrong?

    Or you sound angry are you having a bad day?

    Another example is Wow you must really want this completed right away, I just took your directions as if I do not do this your way, you will come at me with arrows on fire, are you Ok I know you did not mean that...

    Another one is Wow, what you just said to that person was heated, I hope all is OK, I am glad I am not in their shoes or yours, you both had burners on high. I am sure you both will talk about it later when all cools down, now what can I do to help move forward with our work.

    I guess what I am getting at is I turn it back on the person. Nothing personal I just do not do drama. Calling people on their behavior in a nice respectful way will allow the boundaries you set for yourself to be attainable and enforceable. If anything responding this way causes people not to have drama in front of you. I am all for that.
  4. by   Have Nurse
    Quote from Neats
    Being a manager is hard work if you want to be a good one. Follow through is the hardest part of the job.
    If you have good relations with this DON I would respond to this nurse in a way that makes them think before they speak to me. There is an art to verbally speaking.
    You do not provide many specific although you say "browbeat" this means to intimidate, being stern, or arrogance.

    If my boss was talking to me in a stern manner I would stop and say... can I say something...what you just said... I am taking like you are angry with me, did I do something wrong?

    Or you sound angry are you having a bad day?

    Another example is Wow you must really want this completed right away, I just took your directions as if I do not do this your way, you will come at me with arrows on fire, are you Ok I know you did not mean that...

    Another one is Wow, what you just said to that person was heated, I hope all is OK, I am glad I am not in their shoes or yours, you both had burners on high. I am sure you both will talk about it later when all cools down, now what can I do to help move forward with our work.

    I guess what I am getting at is I turn it back on the person. Nothing personal I just do not do drama. Calling people on their behavior in a nice respectful way will allow the boundaries you set for yourself to be attainable and enforceable. If anything responding this way causes people not to have drama in front of you. I am all for that.
    I don't know. I read this and I could still read antagonism, just a little.

    I was a field nurse for years. I have also been a manager and a D.O.N. in Home Care.

    And this poster is right. Management can be hard and a challenge at times. And unless you are privy to ALL of the facts that this Manager is dealing with, you need to be careful before passing judgment. I wasn't there and I cannot speak for the nurses who quit.

    But she didn't get to where she is sitting on her hands. I would be curious to know if the ones who quit really had what it took to do that job appropriately and, if so, they could have privately sat down with the Manager, in a respectful and calm way, shared their concerns and offer solutions.

    It's easy to complain. I use to tell new employees: I don't mind if you have a grievance, but bring some possible solutions to the table with it.

    It can't be easy for her or the company to lose good staff, if they are good. I am sure that there is a way through that.

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