Is nursing theory actually used by working nurses? - page 5

In school I was always told how important nursing theory is in guiding nursing practice and improving care. Both in undergraduate and graduate school my teachers ridiculed PAs for not having a... Read More

  1. by   Robmoo
    Some nursing theory is very practical such as Nightingale's Germ Theory and Environmental Theory. Some nursing theory is less practical such as Rizzo-Price's Theory of Human Becoming. The development of a unique body of knowledge including theories and their practical application are a necessary part of a profession. That being said, some nursing theory is out in left field and some nursing theorists appear to be more like a semi-religious guru rather than a nursing professional.

    This question was asked back in 2010, but I've heard a lot of nurses and student nurses ask the question. Some maybe my response will be helpful to someone seeking an answer.
  2. by   TruvyNurse
    I've not heard one word of NANDA, NIC or NOC since graduating with my RN. Personally, I would have rather skipped that part in school and focused on more clinical things. I know they meant well, but it was useless to me on my career. I haven't even thought about Theories until one of my graduate classes when I had to relearn them in depth. Bleh!!
  3. by   caliotter3
    Quote from TruvyNurse
    I've not heard one word of NANDA, NIC or NOC since graduating with my RN. Personally, I would have rather skipped that part in school and focused on more clinical things. I know they meant well, but it was useless to me on my career. I haven't even thought about Theories until one of my graduate classes when I had to relearn them in depth. Bleh!!
    I totally agree. The time wasted on nursing theory would have been better spent teaching me how to document medication administration. Imagine, leaving out that very important nursing task. Unless, of course, the DNP/PhD prepared curriculum experts did not see the need.
  4. by   VivaLasViejas
    It's been so long since nursing school that I don't even remember which nursing theory we learned. That's how much I've used it during my career. I'm sure it's more heavily emphasized in BSN and MSN programs, but I think I did pretty well without a firm foundation in theory. YMMV.
  5. by   cayenne06
    Quote from LucyLou88
    . Stop sitting around making up convoluted, half baked theories to define your profession on an existential level. Leave that to the I. Kants of the world, and start solving real problems. Let's study, as nurse researchers, the correlation between neurological disorders in children, and vaccinations given before one year. That might help someone, and generate new knowledge that other professions are afraid to generate. Or, the significance of the nutritional deficits offered by the typical American diet and lower IQ? Hey! Maybe we could study preoperative self esteem, and postoperative report of satisfaction on the results in cosmetic surgeries. That may give us a heads up when we are dealing with a malcontent client who will never be happy no matter what we do. Let's study something in our research world besides the theory of theories, and why we need them. Maybe then, we can stop trying so hard to invited to the big table. Pardon my rant. Again, the short answer is no.
    i 100000% agree with your point here. But, i couldn't let the bolded go unquestioned. That research *has* been done. What makes you think other professions are "afraid" to go there? I hope i am wrong but i am sensing you might have some misunderstandings about the strong scientific consensus that exists regarding vaccinations and the relative risks and benefits.
    Vaccine misinformation, esp from a nurse, is seriously dangerous, so i had to call it out. Sorry if i misunderstood!

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