Do potential employers owe you an explaination? - page 3

Often times on here I've posts on here where a an interview has taken place, maybe even a second one, the person is told "you will hear something soon" but "soon" turns into a week, two weeks..no... Read More

  1. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from amoLucia
    Boy, are you asking for a lot! (Note: am being smarty pants here - not intending to insult anyone!)

    In today's work environment where employers are firing employees at-will without reasons it would be awesome if they gave an explanation. But I wouldn't hold my breath.
    ^Agree....they may NOT even have one...they may have forgotten about you...do you REALLY want to know that??? Ask yourself that...
  2. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from K+MgSO4
    I always contact staff. Our recruiting program prompts me to edit a generic email to those that have been unsuccessful at each point in the process.

    I did not appreciate the phone call from the woman who applied for a clerk job that was M-Thus non negotiable who had stated in her app that she couldn't work those days. She phoned me, had me on speaker to whoever else was in the room with her and berated me. This was her response to my email stating that she was not successful in her application.
    ^That is AWFUL about that candidate...it seems as though there are more people willing to chase down an employer and load their frustrations out, ESPECIALLY when they have been inflexible...that is truly mind-boggling!!!
  3. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from WeepingAngel
    I tend to agree with you. It's rude to leave someone hanging, but I dislike this entitled notion. Seems professionalism and courtesy have gone out the window, on both sides of the fence, in most places.
    ^THIS...

    The best coping mechanism in this era is to keep pounding the pavement.

    I applied to a job that had been filled. They called to inform me and actually apologize; a thusly the director of HR did. We got the talking, and landed an interview. They do want me for a position in the company, and I do have a choice...my schedule is hectic, and we mutually agreed to make contact next week to arrange a time to train for a per diem position. I also have constant contact with two recruiters...no position yet. Like I said, "on to the next one..." No job offer, no real "obligation" or courtesy for that matter. If there was a job offer, I would be at orientation now!
  4. by   JeanettePNP
    While I agree that we should not get caught up in ruminating over why we were rejected or how we were treated, there still is a woeful lack of courtesy and professionalism among recruiters/HR professionals, and due to the realities of the job market, they feel they can get away with it. I don't think we need to make excuses for them.
  5. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from Jeanette73
    While I agree that we should not get caught up in ruminating over why we were rejected or how we were treated, there still is a woeful lack of courtesy and professionalism among recruiters/HR professionals, and due to the realities of the job market, they feel they can get away with it. I don't think we need to make excuses for them.
    ^Just because it is a reason DOES NOT make it an "excuse"...

    The REALITY is such, and since we have to play in the sandbox with them, one learns to cope.
  6. by   hiddencatRN
    Quote from LadyFree28
    ^Just because it is a reason DOES NOT make it an "excuse"...

    The REALITY is such, and since we have to play in the sandbox with them, one learns to cope.
    We've all gotten spam emails and mass marketing emails. The technology exists to send out a generic form letter to interviewed candidates with minimal fuss, and many employers do in fact do this. We're not talking handwritten in your best script on nicest stationary two page letter to all thousands of applicants. But a quick, thanks for applying we selected another candidate email blast to the folks who interviewed really is not an unreasonable expectation. It really, truly is not.

    And frankly, the major hospital systems in my area send out email rejections whether you make the interview stage or not, so again, there are employers who choose to be courteous and those who choose not to.
  7. by   Marshall1
    Thank you for all the replies..I think the big deal for the guy I know going through this is he was told he would hear one way or the other and was told he would get another (final) interview and now..nothing - no return phone call, email, zilch. I told him the same as many on here have posted - a response would've been nice - an explanation as to why he didn't move on in the process - a pipe dream - the reality is employers are busy or don't care or a combination. I
    I've advised him to leave it alone - he has emailed and called a few times - that's enough - if they are interested they will call.

    One thing employers don't realize, in my humble opinion, is not following up - "position filled, we've gone w/another candidate" whatever and just leaving someone hanging can damage their reputation as well or make someone who is offered a position in the future think twice about going to work for them - again, not that they care - they are overrun with applicants.
  8. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from hiddencatRN

    We've all gotten spam emails and mass marketing emails. The technology exists to send out a generic form letter to interviewed candidates with minimal fuss, and many employers do in fact do this.
    ^WELL aware of this fact, so???

    We're not talking handwritten in your best script on nicest stationary two page letter to all thousands of applicants. But a quick, thanks for applying we selected another candidate email blast to the folks who interviewed really is not an unreasonable expectation. It really, truly is not.
    But I DON'T...that's MY OPINION and I'm sticking to it...

    And frankly, the major hospital systems in my area send out email rejections whether you make the interview stage or not, so again, there are employers who choose to be courteous and those who choose not to.
    ^Again...I have ENOUGH experience with potential employes to know this fact...so...AGAIN. And???

    What is it going to come down to in the big scheme of things??? That may differ for many, but for me, it doesn't.

    I was rejected several times over a five year period by two separate health systems at two different areas of my life until I got in...I also interview for a position and was rejected, then interviewed with another position and got one. There were several times they didn't call back either...I had that attitude on "on to the next one." I enjoy working for both of the health systems and do a damn good job and enjoy my career...every minute if it-HOWEVER it is run like a business, and one never takes it personally, in business.

    That's my opinion, that helps me...feel free to disagree...but my opinion is not going to change, it reflects the reality that I have faced for the past 14 years working. That's the strategy I use when having to do the dance, whether I was a W-2'er or a 1099'er...and it has served me well, and keeps me enjoying my career.

    If they want to be, uh, "less courteous"="not that into me" at that moment, so be it. NEXT...
  9. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from Marshall1
    One thing employers don't realize, in my humble opinion, is not following up - "position filled, we've gone w/another candidate" whatever and just leaving someone hanging can damage their reputation as well or make someone who is offered a position in the future think twice about going to work for them - again, not that they care - they are overrun with applicants.
    That last line-THEY ARE OVERRUN WITH APPLICANTS is the reality...on to the next one.
    The are hundreds and THOUSANDS of applicants.

    For me, based on the behavior of the local health systems I encounter for a position, they are lines of people waiting to get an interview like they are going on American Idol.
  10. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from ScottE,RN
    Probably easier from a legal standpoint to just not call somebody back than to call them give reasons why they weren't hired and open yourself up to a lawsuit.
    and isn't THAT a sad state of affairs?
  11. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    As we move more and more into a system of online applications and applicants who apply to 100's or even 1000's of jobs, often for which they're not even qualified, I don't think the companies 'owe' applicants anything.

    Ideally, they keep their database updated but in general (I hear all the anecdotes coming out now), if you haven't heard anything within 7 business days, you're probably not moving on in the process.
  12. by   KJM-RN
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    As we move more and more into a system of online applications and applicants who apply to 100's or even 1000's of jobs, often for which they're not even qualified, I don't think the companies 'owe' applicants anything.

    Ideally, they keep their database updated but in general (I hear all the anecdotes coming out now), if you haven't heard anything within 7 business days, you're probably not moving on in the process.
    Just saying, I applied for a job in July and received a call regarding my application for an interview in December.
  13. by   ProfRN4
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥

    Ideally, they keep their database updated but in general (I hear all the anecdotes coming out now), if you haven't heard anything within 7 business days, you're probably not moving on in the process.
    I applied for a job online in Feb or March, heard nothing at all, until today.

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