Blue or white collar? - page 2

Are nurses considered blue collar or white collar workers? My co-workers and I were having this conversation and there was no consensus. p.s. I realize this has been asked before, but I thought... Read More

  1. by   merlee
    Nurses are "pink" collar - - a workforce that is mainly female. Blue collar is mainly factory workers, delivery men, postal workers, police and firefighters.

    At the 'entry' level we have little say about our working conditions - - days/shifts/work area/number of patients. But there is the ability to move up in the workforce.
  2. by   NutmeggeRN
    Quote from Do-over
    I get paid by the hour, and wear my name on my shirt (or badge, anyway). I clean up nasty, nasty things. I work nights, weekends and holidays. I am a blue-collar worker. And I have no issue with that label. I don't consider what I do a "profession" I consider it a "skilled-trade" and I am finally feeling like a journeyman (or journeywoman, I suppose).

    I wouldn't say that ALL nurses are blue-collar though. Professors, manglement, researchers, etc. I would say are white-collar.

    "manglement" ROFL!!!!
  3. by   whichone'spink
    That had to be typed on an iPhone. Damn you auto correct.
  4. by   classicdame
    white to me due to professional licensure - actually, what difference does it make?
  5. by   Stephalump
    Quote from merlee
    Nurses are "pink" collar - - a workforce that is mainly female. Blue collar is mainly factory workers, delivery men, postal workers, police and firefighters.

    .
    This. If we want to be a little less sexist, I'd say Blue Collar.
  6. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from Do-over
    I get paid by the hour, and wear my name on my shirt (or badge, anyway). I clean up nasty, nasty things. I work nights, weekends and holidays. I am a blue-collar worker. And I have no issue with that label. I don't consider what I do a "profession" I consider it a "skilled-trade" and I am finally feeling like a journeyman (or journeywoman, I suppose).

    I wouldn't say that ALL nurses are blue-collar though. Professors, manglement, researchers, etc. I would say are white-collar.
    Manglement.... just about sums it up!
  7. by   Been there,done that
    Quote from grownuprosie
    merriam-webster says nurses are blue collar. however, i think people have different things they believe these terms mean which would explain the disagreement you had. how did they define the terms?

    [color=#7b7b7b]definition of blue-collar


    1
    : of, relating to, or constituting the class of wage earners whose duties call for the wearing of work clothes or protective clothing-compare white-collar

    definition of white-collar

    : of, relating to, or constituting the class of salaried employees whose duties do not call for the wearing of work clothes or protective clothing-compare blue-collar


    that's the best merriam -webster's got?? defining something as complicated as this... and all they refer to is clothing? lame definition!
  8. by   Been there,done that
    I am a professional. Professional equals the white collar definition.

    Sometimes, my duties may not SEEM professional...
    but I have a college degree, I am licensed and credentialed.

    DON'T lump me in with maintenance and housekeeping!
  9. by   RoyalPrince
    the state of _____ has [color="#ff0000"]licensed
    ---as a [color="#0000ff"]professional registered nurse
    active____ expires _____

    hence, we are white collar. dont give in to the blue collar theories. we have a degree specifically preparing for this profession and one can only enter it after having said degree and utilize it during everyday "work"
    not all blue collar jobs require degrees. not all blue collar jobs have entry level requirements.
  10. by   digitiminimi
    I thought, if anything, nursing would be categorized as white collar. I just don't see a profession that has the education requirements, knowledge-level, responsibility, and licensure that we have to be blue collar. But I never looked up the actual dictionary definition. I guess the terms blue and white collar just aren't as relevant in modern times.
  11. by   ChrisSharpe
    No color collar is fit to describe what nurses do
  12. by   LuvScience
    My sociology book calls nursing a white collar profession but I definitely feel like a blue collar worker.
  13. by   knighton201
    I'd have to say nursing would be a "hybrid" of the two, our work at the nurses station documenting care, making care plans, assessment, would seem more white collar I would think, however when called upon to help with a code "brown" i would think that falls back under the blue collar category

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