Obama's health plan takes shape - page 9

Barack Obama's health plan takes shape Source... Read More

  1. by   K98
    Quote from gctmt
    with tempers flaring in closed door meetings on both ends of the capitol, senate majority leader [color=#004276]harry reid (d-nev.), conceded the obvious and said the senate wouldn't have a health care bill until this fall.

    read more: [color=#004276]http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0709/25331.html#ixzz0m98emvrz


    first august came and went, then fall, then spring and summer.
    heartbreaking :d. kudos to hoyer for stating the obvious.
  2. by   NRSKarenRN
    8/1/09:

    phila. inquirer:

    [color=#4385b7]panel advances health overhaul
    by david espo and erica werner, associated press

    committee approval sends the bill to the full house for a vote as early as september.

    washington - in a triumph for president obama, democrats narrowly pushed sweeping health-care legislation through a key congressional committee last night and cleared the way for a september showdown in the house.


    the 31-28 vote in the house energy and commerce committee, along party lines, was weeks later than either the white house or democratic leaders had hoped.
    as part of a last-minute series of changes, the committee agreed to cap increases in the cost of insurance sold under the bill, and also to give the federal government authority to negotiate directly with drug companies for lower prices under medicare.
    ny times:

    [color=#004276]health bill clears hurdle, and hints at consensus

    by robert pear and david m. herszenhorn

    landmark legislation approved by a house committee shows the beginnings of a political consensus to cover more americans and give them new rights with insurers

    ....lawmakers of both parties agree on the need to rein in private insurance companies by banning underwriting practices that have prevented millions of americans from obtaining affordable insurance. insurers would, for example, have to accept all applicants and could not charge higher premiums because of a person’s medical history or current illness. all insurers would have to offer a minimum package of benefits, to be defined by the federal government, and nearly all americans would be required to have insurance....

    ...lawmakers also agree on the need to provide federal subsidies to help make insurance affordable for people with modest incomes. for poor people, [color=#004276]medicaid eligibility would be expanded. ...

    ...details of the major house and senate bills differ, but most employers would have to provide insurance or contribute to the cost of coverage for employees, with exceptions for some small businesses.

    ...in the run-up to final approval, the panel handed the drug industry a victory, voting 47-11 to grant 12 years of market protection to high-tech drugs used to combat cancer, parkinson's, and other serious conditions. the decision was a setback for the white house, which had hoped to give patients faster access to generic versions of costly biotech medicines such as the blockbuster cancer drug avastin...

    ...members of both parties in both chambers want to create health insurance exchanges, where people could shop for insurance and compare policies.
    lawmakers also agree on proposals to squeeze hundreds of billions of dollars out of [color=#004276]medicare by reducing the growth of payments to [color=#004276]hospitals and many other health care providers. they are committed to rewarding high-quality care, by paying for the value, rather than the volume, of services.
    the major bills offer the promise of more affordable insurance for people who are uninsured, including those with chronic illnesses. under the legislation, it might be easier for people to switch jobs because they would not have to stay in less desirable jobs just to retain health insurance. the bills promise relief to people with huge out-of-pocket health costs and would eliminate co-payments for many preventive services...

    legislation: 7/31/09

    h.r 3200, america’s affordable health choices act of 2009 markup, day 5

    america's affordable health choices act of 2009, summary

    america's affordable health choices act of 2009, bill text
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Aug 1, '09
  3. by   HM2VikingRN
  4. by   K98
    Word from our rep. is that ObamaCare has run aground. She feels that the end result will be some sort of insurance reform, but no national health insurance. Polling numbers are against it, and no matter how much smoke and how many mirrors supporters use, they can't find a way to pay for it.
  5. by   herring_RN
    medicare for all (single-payer) reform would be major stimulus for economy with 2.6 million new jobs, $317 billion in business revenue, $100 billion in wages.

    a single-payer system could not only solve our healthcare crisis, but also substantially contribute to putting america back to work and assisting the economic recovery.

    read the study:
    http://www.calnurses.org/research/pd...study_2009.pdf
  6. by   K98
    Of all of the bad alternatives, single payer is the absolute worst.
  7. by   RN4MERCY
    Quote from K98
    Of all of the bad alternatives, single payer is the absolute worst.
    Why?
    From my point of view, and, according to the American Association of the Colleges of Nursing,
    here are the values that form the cornerstone of professional nursing:
    AUTONOMY
    HUMAN DIGNITY
    INTEGRITY
    ALTRUISM
    SOCIAL JUSTICE

    Americans want: guaranteed access, free choice of doctor or nurse practitioner, high quality, affordability, trust and respect

    Canadians get: life expectancy two years longer, infant deaths 25% lower, more MD visits, hospital care, less bureaucracy; universal comprehensive coverage, quality of care equivalent to "insured" Americans', free choice of doctor/hospital, per capita health spending half of US level, access to all medically necessary preventative and restorative health care

    Americans get: one third of population uninsured or underinsured, HMOs denying care to millions more with expensive illnesses, death rates higher than any other wealthy nation, costs double Canada, Germany, Sweden's and rising even faster, executives and investors making billions, destruction of the patient/provider relationship, denied admission, delayed treatment, early discharge, poverty/inability to pay prevents them from receiving the benefit of ongoing nursing care, insurers in charge of who gets care, if they get care or meds, instead of professionals

    In what way is support of the for-profit insurance industry congruent with those values that are at the core of our profession?

    Single payer is fiscally conservative and publicly accountable. It's the most reasonable and responsible health policy. Patients still have the choice to receive their care from any of the existing private or public clinics. The disparities and iniquity would be eliminated and we would have the opportunity to credibly assert that we are indeed one nation, with liberty and justice for all. We're all in this together; we're not just a nation of individuals competing with one another.
  8. by   WORKINGWOMANINTN
    The US Govt has mis-managed Medicare/-aid. It is insolvent. Now the Feds are trying to take advantage of the 'economy of scale' by adding all of the US citizenry, creating 'Medicare for All'. Why won't this work? The government chronically mismanages our tax dollars. And why is America so angry about this?? Partly because they realize they will lose the quality of health care they now enjoy, but ALSO because Congress is being disingenuous.
  9. by   CRNA2007
    were not all in this together. You have the few paying for the many. We will all be in it otgether when everyone pays their fair share for healthcare coverage. By the way Canadians have a higher death rate from cancer. You can't have low cost and quality without rationing or simply denying procedures period end of discussion!



    Quote from RN4MERCY
    Why?
    From my point of view, and, according to the American Association of the Colleges of Nursing,
    here are the values that form the cornerstone of professional nursing:
    AUTONOMY
    HUMAN DIGNITY
    INTEGRITY
    ALTRUISM
    SOCIAL JUSTICE

    Americans want: guaranteed access, free choice of doctor or nurse practitioner, high quality, affordability, trust and respect

    Canadians get: life expectancy two years longer, infant deaths 25% lower, more MD visits, hospital care, less bureaucracy; universal comprehensive coverage, quality of care equivalent to "insured" Americans', free choice of doctor/hospital, per capita health spending half of US level, access to all medically necessary preventative and restorative health care

    Americans get: one third of population uninsured or underinsured, HMOs denying care to millions more with expensive illnesses, death rates higher than any other wealthy nation, costs double Canada, Germany, Sweden's and rising even faster, executives and investors making billions, destruction of the patient/provider relationship, denied admission, delayed treatment, early discharge, poverty/inability to pay prevents them from receiving the benefit of ongoing nursing care, insurers in charge of who gets care, if they get care or meds, instead of professionals

    In what way is support of the for-profit insurance industry congruent with those values that are at the core of our profession?

    Single payer is fiscally conservative and publicly accountable. It's the most reasonable and responsible health policy. Patients still have the choice to receive their care from any of the existing private or public clinics. The disparities and iniquity would be eliminated and we would have the opportunity to credibly assert that we are indeed one nation, with liberty and justice for all. We're all in this together; we're not just a nation of individuals competing with one another.
  10. by   UKRNinUSA
    Quote from WORKINGWOMANINTN
    The US Govt has mis-managed Medicare/-aid. It is insolvent.
    The reason Medicare is insolvent is because the Medicare population is full of high-cost users -the disabled and the over 65's.
    Expand Medicare to all, dilute the user pool with low-cost users and you will solve the problem.

    Alternatively, we could have assisted suicide legislation passed in all 50 states and then we won't need to worry about reforming healthcare at all.
  11. by   WORKINGWOMANINTN
    Good one, UKRNinUSA! Nah, I'd don't suppose we need to go down the 'assisted-suicide' route. At least part of Medicare's problem is that anyone over 65 MUST use Medicare as their primary -- even if they have other options. So that's one 'easy' fix. The gov't has been trying to expand Medicare for years --- we need to reverse it and eliminate it.
  12. by   UKRNinUSA
    Eliminate Medicare? are you serious? Try running for public office on that platform!
  13. by   CRNA2007
    If you are going to eliminate good healthcare for people you don't do it outright you run on a good sound bite that fools people easily like maybe Change and Hope. Yeah that one would work great. Kind of like Changing your employment status to unemployed and then HOPING to get a new job before unemployment runs out.






    Quote from UKRNinUSA
    Eliminate Medicare? are you serious? Try running for public office on that platform!

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