Obama's Health Care plan. Is it a stepping stone to H.R 676, or a road to nowhere? - page 2

Here is a brief overview of his plan. I wonder if it will actually do enough. Part of me thinks that any health care plan that allows the private sector to operate is a waste of time and... Read More

  1. by   GCTMT
    Thanks for the responses from all.

    Regardless, we should expect a lot of the same to come. The government could do a lot better in regards to health care, but most likely they will not, at least for the time being. That is why we should all, as concerned citizens at least, continue to voice our opinions.

    I do not know about the rest of you, but I will not be satisfied until every American citizen has insurance comparable to what H.R 676, offers.
  2. by   GCTMT
    Quote from Bluehair
    I for one would love to hear from some of our international Allnurses members who currently live in a country with government run healthcare.

    Topics of interest that you might be able to share from your experiences:
    - Rationing of healthcare (age related, co-morbidity related, etc.)
    - Waiting lists for care - how often, how long, etc.
    - Is it really free to residents, or is there some sort of copay?
    - Do you also have private insurance available? What does that do for citizens who chose to use it over the public healthcare system? And what percent of the populace (estimated) use private insurance if it is available?
    - How would you compare nursing salaries to US? (Tough one, I know, as cost of living varies so much as well...) How would you compare nursing shortage, responsibilites, etc. as well?

    Anyone?

    Thanks!!

    Bluehair, this might be of interest to you. https://allnurses.com/social-health-...es-386039.html
  3. by   lovethepeople
    Quote from GCTMT
    Thanks for the responses from all.

    Regardless, we should expect a lot of the same to come. The government could do a lot better in regards to health care, but most likely they will not, at least for the time being. That is why we should all, as concerned citizens at least, continue to voice our opinions.

    I do not know about the rest of you, but I will not be satisfied until every American citizen has insurance comparable to what H.R 676, offers.
    I am with you! I will not be satisfied, and we will not see a truly healthy society, until we all have coverage (and coverage that is patient-focused!). I am not confident the government will do anything significant enough to provide care for all but I will certainly continue to raise my voice about it. . .

    Medicare is certainly the model. If nothing can convince people this is true, what about the overhead numbers? Currently, administrative costs are at about 31%!!! We can do so much better with single payer:

    http://patrick.net/wp/?p=16261

    For those not familiar with HR 676 go to:

    http://www.healthcare-now.org/hr-676/
  4. by   cwazycwissyRN
    For those not familiar with 676 perhaps you would like to read the proposed bill its self

    http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bill...?bill=h111-676

    for full text

    http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/z?c111:h676:
  5. by   loriangel14
    Quote from bluehair
    i for one would love to hear from some of our international allnurses members who currently live in a country with government run healthcare.

    topics of interest that you might be able to share from your experiences:
    - rationing of healthcare (age related, co-morbidity related, etc.)
    - waiting lists for care - how often, how long, etc.
    - is it really free to residents, or is there some sort of copay?
    - do you also have private insurance available? what does that do for citizens who chose to use it over the public healthcare system? and what percent of the populace (estimated) use private insurance if it is available?
    - how would you compare nursing salaries to us? (tough one, i know, as cost of living varies so much as well...) how would you compare nursing shortage, responsibilites, etc. as well?

    anyone?

    thanks!!
    actually what i failed to mention is that practitioners cannot provide care to privately insured people if that care is covered by uhc. there is no question of ever being denied care so you don't need private for most care.private insurance cannot provide duplicate coverage. but if you wanted something done like botox injections you would have to pay or have private insurance.
    Last edit by loriangel14 on May 5, '09
  6. by   Jolie
    Quote from loriangel14
    actually what i failed to mention is that practitioners cannot provide care to privately insured people if that care is covered by uhc. there is no question of ever being denied care so you don't need private for most care.private insurance cannot provide duplicate coverage. but if you wanted something done like botox injections you would have to pay or have private insurance.
    so does that effectively prohibit one from using private insurance to speed access to a necessary (but non emergent) procedure such as joint replacement, repair of torn ligaments, gall bladder removal, etc?

    if private insurance is used only for elective procedures (cosmetic, eye refraction, etc.), isn't it cost prohibitive? i can't imagine anyone purchasing private insurance unless they plan to have an elective procedure done, which, it seems, would make the cost of such coverage very expensive.
  7. by   loriangel14
    Quote from jolie
    so does that effectively prohibit one from using private insurance to speed access to a necessary (but non emergent) procedure such as joint replacement, repair of torn ligaments, gall bladder removal, etc?
    these things are covered by uhc so you couyldn't get private insurance for them. uhc is not just for emergency tx but all neccessary tx and procedures. cosmetic and ivf is about the only things not covered.

    if private insurance is used only for elective procedures (cosmetic, eye refraction, etc.), isn't it cost prohibitive? i can't imagine anyone purchasing private insurance unless they plan to have an elective procedure done, which, it seems, would make the cost of such coverage very expensive.
    i have never priced private insurance but it is in use. not very expensive as far as i know.
  8. by   loriangel14
    Quote from jolie
    so does that effectively prohibit one from using private insurance to speed access to a necessary (but non emergent) procedure such as joint replacement, repair of torn ligaments, gall bladder removal, etc?


    there is no way to speed access to care by having more money than someone else. all are seen as equal.
  9. by   elkpark
    Quote from loriangel14

    there is no way to speed access to care by having more money than someone else. all are seen as equal.
    gee, what a concept -- equality.
  10. by   Honnte et Srieux
    There is a phrase used to describe it...it's called "shared misery."
  11. by   loriangel14
    We are not in misery.

    People who are at the lower end of the ecomnomic scale are just as deserving of care as the rich folks. Having money doesn't up your value as a person.
  12. by   Honnte et Srieux
    I didn't say we were in misery, but then, I'm not the one characterizing the current health-care system.

    I agree that people at any point of the economic scale are just as deserving as anyone else for health care. They are just as deserving for food, shelter, transportation, leisure, and luxury.

    We typically don't, however, demand that everyone have the same access to high-dollar food, shelter, transportation, leisure, and luxury. We naturally expect that people have whatever they are willing to purchase and can afford.

    That's all I was saying.
  13. by   loriangel14
    Sure, I see where you are coming from. I agree about the luxuries and leisure part. I think they are considering that they should provide the same level of care to whoever it is, and not make your life a matter of how rich you are.

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