Nurses who can't communicate with their Patients - page 2

So I see that many Internationally educated nurses (IEN) are having a hard time communicating with their patients despite the fact the past their English test. I also see that according to CMS,... Read More

  1. by   coffee4metech
    Originally Posted by pretty_nurse33
    "helloooooo..... i am Asian and im working here in the hospital for 3 years now but i didn't hear any complaints about "not communicating" with my patients. In fact they like me and they understand me better esp my patients because i am more attentive, caring and can communicate well. I don't care if i have accent. Whats up with that? everybody has their own accent. Just accept the fact that many hospitals preferred to hire international nurses because we are more willing to work esp.overtime and we don't complain very much."

    So happy to hear that you think that international nurses are better than nurses raised and educated in the USA . Wow you really must know your stuff and have real grasp on reality and how all the jobs should be done by Asians because they don't complain like us USA gals over here right !?!?!?! You really just warmed my heart and made think even higher of my fellow asian co-workers !!!
  2. by   kafluknik
    Quote from Honnte et Srieux
    It seems to me that the original post was rationally based on an article which recognizes there is a problem with miscommunication related to the English skills of international nurses.

    I hardly think that Yu Xu, the nursing professor born in China, was blaming his coworkers in recognizing and addressing this issue.
    Yes, I agree wth you that Yu Xu, was not blaming his co-workers in this article. However, my point was - communication needs to be worked on. The article states, "Xu recalled his own experience working as a nurse in Alabama. One time he asked a patient how she liked her food and she replied: "It's as good as grits."
    The woman wasn't eating grits, and though Xu knew what grits were, he had no idea why the woman was comparing her meal to them."

    When there is something we as nurses don't understand, we clarify with the client and then summarize. That's how effective communication should be.

    Also, while it is true that some Asian cultures really do have thick accents, I don't think it is fair NOT to hire them on that basis. It is not a matter of race or culture but delivery of care and competence. Although, I must say that the hiring process is subjective most of the time e.g. will his person work well with the team? does this person have the right attitude?, etc. There is no objective measure for this in an hour or 2-hour long interview.
  3. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from mrs.nurseassistant
    originally posted by pretty_nurse33
    "helloooooo..... i am asian and im working here in the hospital for 3 years now but i didn't hear any complaints about "not communicating" with my patients. in fact they like me and they understand me better esp my patients because i am more attentive, caring and can communicate well. i don't care if i have accent. whats up with that? everybody has their own accent. just accept the fact that many hospitals preferred to hire international nurses because we are more willing to work esp.overtime and we don't complain very much."

    so happy to hear that you think that international nurses are better than nurses raised and educated in the usa . wow you really must know your stuff and have real grasp on reality and how all the jobs should be done by asians because they don't complain like us usa gals over here right !?!?!?! you really just warmed my heart and made think even higher of my fellow asian co-workers !!!
    and she's prettier than the rest of us, too -- gotta love that user name!

    i don't think anyone has said that asian nurses aren't competent. the thread is about difficulties in communication with internationally educated nurses. you may think you communicate very well but if your peers, providers and patients cannot understand you, it's a problem.

  4. by   Ginger's Mom
    Quote from kafluknik
    The original post automatically assumes that IEN are the main cause of miscommunication in the health care environment. It fails to consider that clients also come from different cultures and age groups.

    With that said, I think we should all go back to Nursing Theory 101-Therapeutic Communication. And begin reflecting on ourselves before we start blaming co-workers and/or clients.

    Nurses help each other...not find fault with each other.
    It is hard for a nurse who has a heavy accent to communicate. My dad was an immigrant with a very thick accent. He worked all his life to overcome this issue. My experience has been that some (not all IENs) think since they passed the English test that don't ever have to work in this issue again. I have worked with many IENs and patients do complain about them since they can't communicate with there patients. Many are wonderful nurses.


    The point of the article was not to blame but support the IENs to provide better care. When any nurse has an issue ( time management, poor management support we should look for solutions.

    Now all agree that importing IENs is the answer to the nursing problem since for the money sent to bring them here we could establish programs for Americans to fill this void.

    I understand that many of the countries these IENs come from Americans are don't welcome. To the IENs it is up to you to advocate for Americans to practice in your countries so all nurses have an equal playing field in job placements.
  5. by   rn/writer
    Quote from nurse008
    what is wrong with you people? where i work internationally educated nurses (ien), despite the fact that english is their second language they do communicate very well with their patients. let's accept that there are people who look and speak different from us and from what we are use to.
    why does acknowledging communication difficulties automatically imply fault on the part of those doing it? there are many iens who do just fine. there are others who don't. failing to recognize that reality--or worse, being afraid to voice the concern due to unwarranted charges of prejudice--only delays finding solutions.
  6. by   babiella
    Great, subject. my frustration is when a nurse handover a patient. Dont get me wrong, its just frustrates me trying to deal with people who cant speak properly. nurses who cant even use simple english. Its just time consuming and compromises the patients safety. Another excuse nurses use is, Im sorry I just look after this patient today and I dont know him or her that well.....english is also my second language but I always make an effort to use simple words and speak clearly for the other person. I dont blame canada for making registration a difficult process.

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