Doctors develop protocol for talking to patients about bad news

  1. found at healthleadersmedia.com:

    doctors develop protocol for talking to patients about bad news
    baltimore sun, jul 28, 2006

    ...known as spikes, which stands for "setting, perception, invitation, knowledge, empathy and strategy/summary). it emphasizes skills that buckman and baile say are useful for physicians who have to deliver bad news....
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    About NRSKarenRN, BSN, RN Moderator

    Joined: Oct '00; Posts: 27,524; Likes: 13,741
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    3 Comments

  3. by   Beary-nice
    Thanks NRSKaren for sharing that. It makes sense to me. I would like to see more physicians implement something like this rather than some of the other things I have seen happen over the years. Needs to be taught to new and seasoned MDs, I agree.
  4. by   rn/writer
    What an excellent presentation. I wish more docs had exposure to this. And nurses as well.

    I work postpartum which is a happy place most of the time, but we have had parents whose babies were found to have birth defects or other serious conditions AFTER presenting as normal newborns. These folks needed the same kind of TLC and respect and support as the cancer patients.

    After the docs deliver the bad news, we nurses are the ones left to either pick up the pieces if the information has been handled badly or reinforce the caring and knowledge if the doc has done a better job.

    Patients deserve to have as much truth as they choose to hear with as much support as they need to process it. Gone are the days (thank goodness) of the paternalistic docs who decided what and how much the patient could handle without including THEM in the process.

    With this kind of teaching, I hope we will also see the end of docs who drop bombshells and disappear, docs who disconnect to spare themselves pain and frustration, docs who slam shut all doors of hope in the name of being "realistic," docs who forget that patients are more than just bodies, and docs who will not let themselves care or show caring because it seems "unprofessional."

    I hope these lessons have a great impact on the practitioners receiving them. Perhaps more will "do it right" if someone shows them how. The patients, the families, the docs, and all the rest of the staff will certainly benefit.

    Thanks, Karen, for finding and sharing this.
  5. by   Beary-nice
    Quote from rn/writer
    Patients deserve to have as much truth as they choose to hear with as much support as they need to process it. Gone are the days (thank goodness) of the paternalistic docs who decided what and how much the patient could handle without including THEM in the process.

    Agree with you that pts deserve to have as much truth as they chose to hear, but unfortunately in my neck of the woods, we still have those "paternalistic" doctors. Sad but true. All the more reason for such a program.

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