Returning to work while In RAMP monitoring program

  1. I was forced to join the RAMP program after taking my prescription pain pills during and before work. I was determined to be under the influence. When this happened 7 months ago I thought my career was over. After getting over my grief and anger I opened my mind and heart and accepted treatment. I needed it. After working hard to stay clean by doing NA meetings, counseling and focusing on myself. I have reached the place in the program were I can return to work with some restrictions. I never thought I would ever get here. I'm a bit nervous about returning to work. I have to apply and I would like to know your experience with returning to work. Thank You so much
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  2. Visit Clara38 profile page

    About Clara38, BSN

    Joined: Oct '15; Posts: 16; Likes: 19

    12 Comments

  3. by   CryssyD
    I just finished another state's program. I have been working at a prison for almost 4 years now--they were the most receptive to the idea of having me as an employee while on monitoring. The local hospital and nursing homes wouldn't even interview me. When I first started looking for work, my restrictions included no narcotics access and no night shifts, both of which made it hard for places to employ me--but I'm sure they could have worked something out if they really wanted to.

    I don't know your background or experience, of course, so I can't suggest anything in particular. I did want to say that, although you may have to knock on numerous doors before one opens up for you, eventually you will find something. I think the key is to keep an open mind about any opportunity presented to you--I would never in a million years have considered working in a prison before I got myself into trouble, but I am actually really happy in my job, so you just never know how things will go until you try.

    Congrats on making it this far--getting the OK to go back to work is really a big step, you must be doing well! Just be honest about what happened and concentrate on the positive aspects of the past 7 months: what you've learned, how you've grown and developed because of what you've been through, your goals and plans for the future, etc, etc. Focusing on the positive really goes a long way, I think, in making you an attractive applicant for any position.

    Best of luck to you! Keep us posted on how it's going!
  4. by   Clara38
    I forgot to share the type of nursing I did. I was in Med Surg /urology/tele
  5. by   Clara38
    Thank you so much for taking the time to post your comment. It's funny you mentioned working corrections. I mentioned it to my husband but he is concerned about safety and what happens if a riot happens. I'm not concerned I think I would do my job and not get involved at a personal level. I'm going to apply for it. Hopefully there's an opening.
  6. by   iluvivt
    I do not understand why you had to go into RAMP. Are you not allowed in NJ to take legally prescribed prescription narcotics as prescribed while at work? Many with chronic pain actually function better once their pain is relieved!
  7. by   dirtyhippiegirl
    Quote from iluvivt
    I do not understand why you had to go into RAMP. Are you not allowed in NJ to take legally prescribed prescription narcotics as prescribed while at work? Many with chronic pain actually function better once their pain is relieved!
    Since she got caught, one would assume she was acting impaired which you most assuredly cannot do.
  8. by   Clara38
    According to the board of nursing taking Percocet before going to work is the same as being under the influence. I was told that I should of called out of work.
  9. by   iluvivt
    Thank you kindly for sharing...wow! SO if you have chronic pain or any pain for that matter that is managed with narcotics you have to suffer if want to work. I wish you the best and hang in there!
  10. by   Clara38
    Quote from dirtyhippiegirl
    Since she got caught, one would assume she was acting impaired which you most assuredly cannot do.
    That night I was dehydrated and hadn't eaten anything. I had a Sx that makes it imperative I do both. That night I finished my shift did all my stuff I was just looking tired. I gave report and was on my way out. That's when something was said. My entire shift went by I did my job got out on time. I just don't know.

    anyhow what happened can't be fixed or fought. I've accepted that this is what I must deal with I turned a new page so the details don't matter to my today. I'm nervous and afraid I won't find work. I have a family and this has been tough on everyone. I just really want to know if finding work while in RAMP will be possible or is the reality something different.

    Thank for your thoughts on this matter
  11. by   odaat
    It is entirely not only possible but likely that you will find work! It may not be what you'd like to do and it may take time and a few closed doors and awkward interviews but it will happen. There isn't a single nurse I know in this situation who hasn't found work, myself included. It took me over a year and seemed so hopeless at times but I did eventually find work in dialysis. I would suggest you look there as they are very stipulation friendly and there are no narcotics in the building. I know that horrible hopeless feeling in the beginning, just hang in there and know that this isn't the end for you and you WILL work again!
  12. by   tamifitz
    Any chance you would be able to tell me if when you look up your license would it say restricted on it? because I was thinking of changing fields while in the program.... I am just starting the program myself and this has been very difficult and stressful. I know exactly how you felt because I feel it now and I'm thinking of surrendering my license to pursue a career in RT... any advice?

    I wish you the best of luck and hope you find work soon...
  13. by   CryssyD
    Quote from tamifitz
    Any chance you would be able to tell me if when you look up your license would it say restricted on it? because I was thinking of changing fields while in the program.... I am just starting the program myself and this has been very difficult and stressful. I know exactly how you felt because I feel it now and I'm thinking of surrendering my license to pursue a career in RT... any advice?

    I wish you the best of luck and hope you find work soon...
    A surrendered professional license in one field is a red flag for licensing boards in another field and they will follow up. Dropping out of a monitoring program says to a Board, rightly or wrongly, "I don't want to get 'better'."

    I would never tell someone not to surrender a license or change fields if that's what he/she really wants to do, but changing hats is not the solution to the stresses or difficulties of a monitoring program. (I thought about it, too, believe me. It'll pass.) My advice, for what it's worth, is to finish the program if at all possible. This gives you ammunition for later questions if you do seek licensure in another area, as well as a real sense of accomplishment. The programs are always overwhelming at first--trust me, you'll never like it but you will get used to it. Just keep your chin up and keep looking forward; only look back to see how far you've come
  14. by   CryssyD
    Quote from iluvivt
    Thank you kindly for sharing...wow! SO if you have chronic pain or any pain for that matter that is managed with narcotics you have to suffer if want to work. I wish you the best and hang in there!
    No, just don't take the stuff at work--only at home. And never allow yourself to drive if you're possibly impaired by your medication--yes, even if you have a script, you can still get a DUI if a cop thinks you're under the influence.

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