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Nurses that “only do it for the money”

Nurses   (13,659 Views 247 Comments)
by AFJ32780 AFJ32780, BSN, RN (Member)

AFJ32780 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN.

688 Visitors; 81 Posts

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AFJ32780 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN.

688 Visitors; 81 Posts

5 minutes ago, JadedCPN said:

I'm curious, what do you think about nurses who go into the profession only because they think it is their calling?

I say more power to them. 

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JadedCPN has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Pediatric Float RN.

1 Follower; 6,646 Visitors; 615 Posts

13 minutes ago, AFJ32780 said:

I say more power to them. 

Do you have an opinion or preference one way or the other?

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TriciaJ has 37 years experience as a RN and works as a Retired.

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1 hour ago, AFJ32780 said:

Disclaimer:

I am not bashing anyone 

just trying to get the perspectives of other nurses. 🙂 

The point that people here are making is that nursing seems to be the only profession where motivation is even an issue.  Why do we need to ponder whether someone has responded to a Noble Calling or we're just crass mercenaries?  Do people in any other occupation have to deal with this crap?

Listen to public opinion whenever nurses anywhere go on strike.  You'll hear all kinds of snide cracks about "lack of dedication" "they don't care about the patients" and yes, "just in it for the money".

No one I ever worked with accused me of "just being in it for the money".  I spent 35 years getting positive feedback from patients, coworkers and employers.  But when they started giving me a pension cheque to stay home, guess what?  I quit going.  I guess I was just in it for the money all along.  Pretty much like the rest of the world.

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laflaca has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Public High School Nurse.

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  You might want to read a classic book called "The Managed Heart," by Arlie Hochschild, from way back in the 1980's. She talks about how people in service oriented jobs (which like nursing are traditionally female) - from flight attendants to coffee baristas - are required to not only perform their stated job tasks, but also perform emotional labor to make their clients feel liked, appreciated, interesting, worthwhile, etc (no matter if the clients are acting like giant a-holes, and no matter if the worker has to suppress and hide her own completely understandable true feelings, in many cases tolerating abuse).  In my opinion, this service industry mindset has infected nursing practice, not improving our working conditions one bit.

My job is to keep people safe and healthy, and I do so with respect and professional practices. Just as I would if I were an electrician or a lifeguard or a neurologist.  But I don't accept that I have to prove my altruism to you or anyone. Not must i tolerate abuse and crappy working conditions in the name of being a "caring nurse," or make apologies for actually wanting a paycheck.  Part of supporting our profession and our nurse colleagues, to me, is calling this stuff out and reconsidering our assumptions.

 

 

 

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TriciaJ has 37 years experience as a RN and works as a Retired.

10 Followers; 32,651 Visitors; 3,116 Posts

And I just thought of the other side of the whole "Noble Calling" mindset.  Because we have to be such caring, compassionate angels to even think of being nurses, we should have limited accountability when we royally screw up.

Practice in an egregiously reckless and negligent manner?  But she's a nurse; she didn't mean to harm anyone!  Florence Nightengale gave up her aristocratic life and incurred the wrath of her family to take up a noble cause.  Hats off to her.  The rest of us are just earning a living.  We have rules, regulations and procedures to follow and we expect a paycheque.

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morelostthanfound has 27 years experience as a BSN and works as a R.N..

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7 minutes ago, laflaca said:

  You might want to read a classic book called "The Managed Heart," by Arlie Hochschild, from way back in the 1980's. She talks about how people in service oriented jobs (which like nursing are traditionally female) - from flight attendants to coffee baristas - are required to not only perform their stated job tasks, but also perform emotional labor to make their clients feel liked, appreciated, interesting, worthwhile, etc (no matter if the clients are acting like giant a-holes, and no matter if the worker has to suppress and hide her own completely understandable true feelings, in many cases tolerating abuse).  In my opinion, this service industry mindset has infected nursing practice, not improving our working conditions one bit.

My job is to keep people safe and healthy, and I do so with respect and professional practices. Just as I would if I were an electrician or a lifeguard or a neurologist.  But I don't accept that I have to prove my altruism to you or anyone. Not must i tolerate abuse and crappy working conditions in the name of being a "caring nurse," or make apologies for actually wanting a paycheck.  Part of supporting our profession and our nurse colleagues, to me, is calling this stuff out and reconsidering our assumptions.

 

 

 

This^^  Just the sentence alone, "Nurses that only do it for the money" is meant to sound dirty and derogatory, somehow likening it to the world's oldest profession!  I'm sure most nurses feel genuinely compelled to help people and do derive satisfaction from assisting them to a better state of health, but along with this privilege comes high stress, exposure to bodily fluids (sometime infectious), working long hours/weekends/holidays, sometimes unachievable expectations, verbal abuse....all for mediocre pay.  Not really my idea of 'a calling', but hey, if it's yours, knock yourself out-I want to be well compensated.

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My last profession - teaching - had this same question as well.

So I did a quick survey: My brother has never been asked if it was his calling to be a computer programmer, nor my brother in law a geologist. My sister in law hasn’t been asked at all whether it’s a calling to be in marketing.

So I agree .. it’s these female dominated, helping professions that others must demand, “there must be a calling to be good at our jobs.” It’s sickening. Yes: I like the money. Yes: I get paid quite well, and the OT helps push that over. I love my hours, and could never work an 8-4, M-F job again. Working for the state also has its benefits. I’m also good at what I do. 

It’s not a calling for me - and that’s ok.

 

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

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36 minutes ago, laflaca said:

  You might want to read a classic book called "The Managed Heart," by Arlie Hochschild, from way back in the 1980's. She talks about how people in service oriented jobs (which like nursing are traditionally female) - from flight attendants to coffee baristas - are required to not only perform their stated job tasks, but also perform emotional labor to make their clients feel liked, appreciated, interesting, worthwhile, etc (no matter if the clients are acting like giant a-holes, and no matter if the worker has to suppress and hide her own completely understandable true feelings, in many cases tolerating abuse).  In my opinion, this service industry mindset has infected nursing practice, not improving our working conditions one bit.

My job is to keep people safe and healthy, and I do so with respect and professional practices. Just as I would if I were an electrician or a lifeguard or a neurologist.  But I don't accept that I have to prove my altruism to you or anyone. Not must i tolerate abuse and crappy working conditions in the name of being a "caring nurse," or make apologies for actually wanting a paycheck.  Part of supporting our profession and our nurse colleagues, to me, is calling this stuff out and reconsidering our assumptions.

 

 

 

Pink collar professions

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laflaca has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a Public High School Nurse.

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1 minute ago, pixierose said:

My last profession - teaching - had this same question as well.

So I did a quick survey: My brother has never been asked if it was his calling to be a computer programmer, nor my brother in law a geologist. My sister in law hasn’t been asked at all whether it’s a calling to be in marketing.

So I agree .. it’s these female dominated, helping professions that others must demand, “there must be a calling to be good at our jobs.” It’s sickening. Yes: I like the money. Yes: I get paid quite well, and the OT helps push that over. I love my hours, and could never work an 8-4, M-F job again. Working for the state also has its benefits. I’m also good at what I do. 

It’s not a calling for me - and that’s ok.

 

ha!  I was a social worker before I was a nurse, and it was the same thing.  Not that we were "only in it for the (terrible) pay,"...more like:  "If you truly were compassionate and cared about our clients/mission/social justice vision, and if you were the special person truly called to this profession, you would.....(stay late, agree to be on call, work for free, not complain about unsafe working conditions, etc)."    

For the record, I worked for a few years as an interpreter/translator, and no one ONCE asked me if it was my calling.  

I think that some people are very uneasy about women working at all, and tolerate the idea more easily if we are motivated by our 'natural caring abilities' and not by filthy lucre.  Other people use the 'true calling' argument to justify why traditionally female jobs are paid so much less than traditionally male ones. 

We get paid less, but we're just up to our ears in warm fuzzies.  Personally - I'd rather be up to my ears in filthy lucre 🙂 

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RNNPICU has 13 years experience.

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When it all comes down to it, a job is a job.  I enjoy my job, I like coming to work, my job just happens to be a RN. Some of my colleagues are all about the calling, others just want a job.  I have often wondered those that feel it is a calling want to have a more deeper connection with their job.  Iwanted to be a nurse since I was a kid, and it took some trial and error, but I got there.  I haven't felt a calling, but it was something I wanted to do. Some of it because of pay, some for opportunity, and some because I like what nurses can do. I have hear others in other professions say that their current profession is one that they have wanted to do since they were a kid.  Is that a calling? Since it isn't nursing, likely not, just something that others are destined for?  I have often wondered if a CPA, or a Business executive who may have dreamed about top jobs as kids or young adults, but would never call it a calling.  

As nurses we take care of people, manage care plans, manage medications, ensure safety and well-being of our patients, we provide basic cares and also serve as advocates.  

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN.

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14 hours ago, AFJ32780 said:

What is your thought on nurses who only join the profession for financial gains? 

Good for them!  As long as they're doing their jobs, I'm happy.  It's the ones who have a "calling" that irritate the ever loving daylights out of me.  All of that "holier than thou" nonsense is disgusting!

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN.

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12 hours ago, TriciaJ said:

What do we think of firefighters who are only in it for the money?  How about baristas?  Shoe salepeople?  Who cares why they do what they do as long as they do it decently?  And if they don't do it decently, then it's a problem for someone.

Are nurses supposed to be inherently different?  Do we somehow have different DNA from everyone else?

Well, we're all supposed to be saintly, didn't you know?

 

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