Nurse sues hospital: says she was fired for reporting patient safety concerns

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by Tagg Member

icuRNmaggie, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU. Has 24 years experience. 1,970 Posts

Cheryl Schultz stated her concerns about bad practices and unsafe staffing levels and was terminated for not having "the right tone" to be in the charge nurse position. The demotion and termination is a lot of trumped up nonsense.

This exact scenario happened to a dear friend of mine who was an employee for 25 years, & a charge nurse for 10 years, when she presented EBP against tripling in ICU. She was devastated.

Kudos to Cheryl for exposing all of it. I wish her the very best.

Edited by icuRNmaggie

Momma1RN, MSN, RN, APRN

Has 8 years experience. 219 Posts

Sounds like she may have a case... especially considering there is another lawsuit pending from an MD about the hospitals' practices...

imintrouble, BSN, RN

Specializes in LTC Rehab Med/Surg. Has 16 years experience. 2,406 Posts

Whistleblowing is a devastating business for the one who blows the whistle.

Doesn't mean it shouldn't be done, but be mindful of the cost.

One whistle doesn't make a lot of noise. But dozens of them can. Unfortunately, the other nurses who might support C Schulz, have seen first hand what it will cost.

nurse4ever08

188 Posts

Always have a second job lined up before blowing a whistle. I hope she is successful

icuRNmaggie, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU. Has 24 years experience. 1,970 Posts

Always have a second job lined up before blowing a whistle. I hope she is successful

Excellent advice. There are States in which whistle-blower protection applies only to State and Federal employees. It would be best to line up another job and to consult an employment attorney before going down that path. This would be especially important in States which are employment at will. This means that a person can be terminated for no cause or no cause at any time.

RiskManager

Specializes in Healthcare risk management and liability. 1 Article; 615 Posts

I think the real sticky wicket is either finding or keeping that new job if it becomes known that you are a whistle-blower. And it usually does, especially if you get publicity for it.