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Nurse Satisfaction comes before Patient Satisfaction

Nurses Article   (21,416 Views 43 Comments 643 Words)
by JanineKelbach JanineKelbach (Member) Writer

JanineKelbach works as a RN.

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This Article is going to review and reference the article titled: Patient Satisfaction Must Start With Nursing Satisfaction. Why do these scores matter? Are you a dissatisfied nurse? How can we make nurses happier? You are reading page 2 of Nurse Satisfaction comes before Patient Satisfaction. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

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I'm a believer that if nurses are satisfied, enjoy their jobs and their colleagues, and have good leadership, then it will trickle down to patient care.

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Daisy4RN has 20 years experience.

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I had a patient once whose daughter literally told me to " her my mother some colder ice".

And I had a patients daughter literally screaming at me once (among many other things) because her Dad wanted a popsicle and we were taking too long...UGH

Edited by Daisy4RN

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I believe, as with everything, we let the pendulum swing too far from one side to the other.

Whether anyone like to believe it or not, healthcare is a business. It has to be. Patients are our customers. They have choices on where to go. No customers=no jobs for nurses. Lower reimbursements mean less raises and desperately needed supplies for nurses. And yes, hospitals that provide better care should be properly reimbursed for that care. The problem lies on what is being judged on those surveys.

Food, how quickly we answer that call light, and pain meds should not be apart of that survey. Things like outcomes from that surgery or treatment, did you feel like you were listened to, and bedside manner should be. Did your broken ankle heal properly? Was your baby delivered safely? Is your child back to school? Did your physician listen to your concerns? Did you feel comfortable asking your nurse questions and did they answer those questions for you? That should be these surveys. Not, what was the dang quality of the food? Or did you feel your pain control was acceptable? Sometimes, there is just going to be some pain. Sorry, your ribs are broken. That is painful.

I guess I just disagree with nurse satisfaction is the only thing and that will make patient satisfaction better. I can tell you from experience that 100% employee satisfaction does not always translate into happier customers. There has to be a balance.

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Feb 19 by Susie2310

The patient is the recipient/consumer of the health care services and they/their insurance are paying for their care, so yes, they have the right to express their opinion about the quality of the care they have received, and it is reasonable that their experience should count as part of quality of care measurements for reimbursement purposes. And don't forget, without the patient bringing income into the facility, the nurses wouldn't get paid! Yes, nurses wouldn't have jobs - I know this is a shock to some.

Patients often do have the option of where to receive care, so it is pretty foolish to say that their opinions about the care they received shouldn't count for reimbursement purposes. It's actually pretty insulting to patients to assert that they are so ignorant/biased/unaware that they can't determine their quality of care in any meaningful way and are unqualified to comment but should just shut up and gratefully receive health care services (nursing care/medical care). Yes, of course some patients for a number of reasons (illness, infirmity, etc.) may be less able to objectively appraise the quality of their care, but they as patients/consumers of health care services have the right to express their opinions about the quality of care they have received just like other patients/consumers.

A very large part of good nursing care deals with things patients dislike and don't care of want to do. Much of the educating that goes along with an improved long term outcome many times flies in the face of their lifestyles. People in general, not just patients, do not react positively to what they aren't ready to hear or do and they rarely will not carry that bias to the surveys.

So now they want nurses to create of culture of making the patient happy instead of what is actually best for the patient's immediate and future health. We all know this and for those nurses that care about patient's outcomes it creates a professional and personal conflict. It is very difficult to feel satisfied about your work once put into this type of a position. So it it my personal opinion these surveys and the managerial pressure that comes with them has had a huge negative impact on the work and professional satisfaction of nurses everywhere.

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Michelle Rhodes has 20 years experience and works as a Nurse Entrepreneur.

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Great read my Linked In friend Janine~ :cat: you hit the nail on the head! Michelle

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JanineKelbach works as a RN.

2 Likes; 2 Followers; 19 Articles; 8,549 Visitors; 76 Posts

hahah thanks Michelle ;-)

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JanineKelbach works as a RN.

2 Likes; 2 Followers; 19 Articles; 8,549 Visitors; 76 Posts

Easier said than done...you know? :( We don't have the time with ratios being high, and our shifts being long, but never long enough to get all the work done.

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JanineKelbach works as a RN.

2 Likes; 2 Followers; 19 Articles; 8,549 Visitors; 76 Posts

Nurse Satisfaction is not the SOLE answer to patient satisfaction, you are absolutely right.

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JanineKelbach works as a RN.

2 Likes; 2 Followers; 19 Articles; 8,549 Visitors; 76 Posts

Quote:

"Hospitals are a business, and excellent scores mean better reimbursement from Medicaid. Reimbursement equals money, and as nurses, we often don't think of the hospital as a business because we are in a caregiver role, not a salesperson"

And this is the first problem!!! Reimbursement should not be based on the satisfaction of sick people who do not understand job descriptions. I agree that happy nurses will (for the most part) make happy patients. Best way to do that is to let the nurse be autonomous in her/his daily activity, and to provide the time to do just that.

Easier said than done...you know? crUeu+0msLvH62OAjsSVVcnmLI2h5LSV1iUxAqKmb26tL1rmloaIjjR1ZrW+GGfVNHQmiFzPH2v4eHGJCOiEw1PZXJnKASqZkEOl4BA= We don't have the time with ratios being high, and our shifts being long, but never long enough to get all the work done.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and works as a Director of OB Services.

302 Likes; 3 Followers; 112,044 Visitors; 12,926 Posts

Easier said than done...you know? :( We don't have the time with ratios being high, and our shifts being long, but never long enough to get all the work done.

Hi Janine - when responding to an individual post, please hit the "quote" button in the bottom right corner of that post. That way, we will all know who/what you are responding to. Thanks!

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Here.I.Stand has 13 years experience and works as a RN.

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There's certainly some improvements that could be made, but as a basic premise I don't see a problem with payers providing financial incentive for facilities to provide more support for those providing care.

Except from what I hear (I've heard "pt satisfaction surveys" come from my manager's mouth exactly once in the four years I've worked under her) this isn't generally what happens. Rather than using that info as an incentive to increase staff, they blame the nurses. Remember that empathy exercise where the nurses were made to lie on a cart in the ED hallway, wearing goggles and denied access to the BR? I want to say it was a hospital in Illinois? They would have done well to staff more nurses, but they decided that the nurses simply didn't do well enough because they don't know what it's like to be a pt, nor did they care.

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Here.I.Stand has 13 years experience and works as a RN.

42 Likes; 1 Follower; 41,516 Visitors; 4,759 Posts

And I had a patients daughter literally screaming at me once (among many other things) because her Dad wanted a popsicle and we were taking too long...UGH
Unacceptable. That should warrant a call to security, not faster waitressing.:mad:

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