IV and Blood Withdrawal?

  1. I am a Registered Nurse in the PHILIPPINES awaiting news from the CA BON.

    I recently was hired as a Medical Assistant in-training for a clinic. And I was expected to know how to perform blood withdrawal because RNs here have already trained IVF and Blood withdrawal before they graduate nursing school.

    But recently registered nurses in the Philippines, they get this training once the hospital hires them because IVF and blood withdrawal training are paid by the employers.

    So since I have a month worth of experience as a Medical Assistant here in the US I have a good chance on landing on an entry-level job related in the Medical Field.

    So while I am waiting for any news from the CA BON, I was thinking of getting an IV/Blood Withdrawal Course so that when I get hired anywhere I would have knowledge to do it.

    But the problem is these certifications might need me to be an LVN or a RN here in CA. I am still inquiring. And even if I do take the class the certification will not be given to be until I get an LVN or RN license

    Do you guys think that is a good idea to go for those classes ?
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    About rabidlark

    Joined: Sep '17; Posts: 9

    6 Comments

  3. by   JKL33
    My observation in recent years: It's not at all uncommon for new grads to have had 0-5 or so opportunities to attempt an IV insertion during school and may or may not have been successful in doing so, although they have learned the related principles and had the opportunity to practice in simulation situations. They typically have less experience than that at attempting phlebotomy/blood draws.

    Hopefully someone here will be able to comment on the potential benefit of these proposed classes with regard to the job market, but just strictly speaking about how proficient your new-grad job competitors will be, I haven't noticed much proficiency with this amongst new grads from US programs and it is generally something that is understood to require practice during the RN orientation at the new job.
  4. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    After NCLEX, I applied to hospitals with 0 experience, and I took an IV class, paid for with my own money, and put it on my resume. It does help to stand out. Now in terms of being actually proficient with it, most hospitals require you to demonstrate proficiency regardless by passing a test and doing at least 3-5 successful IV starts.

    From what I notice, new grads who aren't given a chance to go to the ER dept and do IVs usually don't get the hang of it on the floor they're orientating because the opportunities are less.
  5. by   traumaRUs
    Moved to Nurse Registration
  6. by   rabidlark
    I recently took an IV/Blood Withdrawal class in Quest Nursing in Oakland. And they said I will have 12 units of CEUs attached to my record once i get my RN license. I guess it is great to take these classes for further education.
  7. by   caliotter3
    Check into this: The last time I attended such a course, we were told that RN's were no longer being given credit for the course because that info is supposed to be included in nursing school (for RN). LVNs get credit for the course because it is not included as part of the typical LVN curriculum and is not required to obtain the LVN license.
  8. by   Lipoma
    Quote from caliotter3
    Check into this: The last time I attended such a course, we were told that RN's were no longer being given credit for the course because that info is supposed to be included in nursing school (for RN).
    Sadly, it is being phased out in nursing school. I'm in a BSN-RN program and the only IV experience we get is flushing during our skills lab and during our clinical rotation. We were told that once we get our first job we will receive on-the-job training. Same thing with venipuncture. Good thing I was a MA before nursing school so I received enough practice for blood draws...

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