Why would she say this?

  1. I have always wanted to be an NP. I was at the health clinic at my university, and one of the nurse practitioners told me it would be a big mistake to go to NP school. She said, "you will work so many more hours and make less pay than a floor nurse." All my other sources tell me otherwise. She also said I will find it impossible to get a job. Does she hate her job? Does she not want the competition? I didn't go into nursing for the money anyway, but why so negative?
  2. Visit ellieRN06 profile page

    About ellieRN06

    Joined: Jul '06; Posts: 19; Likes: 3

    7 Comments

  3. by   CaseManager1947
    I'm guessing you'd have to ask the person who made those comments to you. I take it she was a student health nurse; rather a bummer to be presenting the negative side of her own job. perhaps, as you suggested, she doesn't like it, that doesn't mean it's a bad career choice for you!!
    It totally depends upon which type position you decide upon after graduation, and the expected hours, call time if any, and salary should have been negotiated prior to assumption of duties. NP is one job where you can bring to the table your goals for salary reimbursement, and negotiate your own contract. It sounds as though she is rather projecting her own dissatisfaction with this role onto others, (just a guess). Perhaps speak with your adivser at school. What is your passion in nursing??? what do you really want to do. Is is little babies, pregnant moms, critical care. whatever it is, do it if you feel you want to.
  4. by   brownrice
    Your right, it ain't about the pay....it's about a higher level of autonomy...a higher degree of respect...engaging your mind...and unleashing your spirit~~what have you researched with a passion--now you can make educated judgements based on this research/practice and help others with this knowledge, without first running it by the authority (a doctor). The thing is, higher pay will come with this position. And guess what? If you so choose, you can work Monday-Friday, 8-5 for this pay. Shifts? Time and a half for holiday pay? Initially, NP new grad salary may be neck-in-neck with a RN who works crappy hours, shifts, nights, holidays, or has to travel to make this "great money". After a couple years, however, the NP pay will increase. IMHO, folks who can't visualize how this is so much better don't have what it takes to be the type of professional I have described above. For this, they will stay locked into a job taking orders, sharing their negative opinion with others who have a bit more ambition than they could ever dream of. Whatever your mind can conceive, you can achieve. Leave folks like this and their negative attitudes in your trail of dust.
  5. by   christvs
    Don't listen to her. I think there are always going to be some negative people you will encounter who are unhappy where they are. If being an NP is what you've always wanted, then go for it! And personally, I value autonomy and having greater input and responsibility way more than what I get paid when I'm an NP versus what other RNs make.
  6. by   prairienp
    Quote from ellieRN06
    I have always wanted to be an NP. I was at the health clinic at my university, and one of the nurse practitioners told me it would be a big mistake to go to NP school. She said, "you will work so many more hours and make less pay than a floor nurse." All my other sources tell me otherwise. She also said I will find it impossible to get a job. Does she hate her job? Does she not want the competition? I didn't go into nursing for the money anyway, but why so negative?
    She was having a bad day. Student health is often a great job, great hours. Think about holidays at the University, no students , no patients. Summers are great. With that said, I am sure the salary is less. Supply an demand is an issue , as a lot of NPs like working student health. It is not the $$$, but the environment. Student health jobs may be scarce, NP jobs are wide open, look at the minute clinics, rural health. If you want the NP, enjoy the process and the outcome.
  7. by   traumaRUs
    I would guess that she wasn't happy being an RN either.

    I am a CNS (graduated May 06). I negotiated a contract in a completely different field in which I had nada, zippo, no experience whatsoever. However, what I did bring to this position is a load of experience handling emergencies and dealing with difficult people. The powers that be chose me over two other experienced NPs because I was energetic and had a positive, upbeat personality.

    So...it just goes to prove that you don't even need experience, if you bring something else to the table that is valued.

    Good luck - I say go for it.
  8. by   subee
    Quote from brownrice
    Your right, it ain't about the pay....it's about a higher level of autonomy...a higher degree of respect...engaging your mind...and unleashing your spirit~~what have you researched with a passion--now you can make educated judgements based on this research/practice and help others with this knowledge, without first running it by the authority (a doctor). The thing is, higher pay will come with this position. And guess what? If you so choose, you can work Monday-Friday, 8-5 for this pay. Shifts? Time and a half for holiday pay? Initially, NP new grad salary may be neck-in-neck with a RN who works crappy hours, shifts, nights, holidays, or has to travel to make this "great money". After a couple years, however, the NP pay will increase. IMHO, folks who can't visualize how this is so much better don't have what it takes to be the type of professional I have described above. For this, they will stay locked into a job taking orders, sharing their negative opinion with others who have a bit more ambition than they could ever dream of. Whatever your mind can conceive, you can achieve. Leave folks like this and their negative attitudes in your trail of dust.
    I didn't stay on the floors long myself, but as a CRNA I guess I'm one of those dopes who choses to work "crappy hours, shifts, nightsm, holidays.."
    Lots of people who stay at the bedside LIKE their work. Your tone is demeaning and nasty to those folks who CHOOSE to stay on a floor.
  9. by   brownrice
    If nurses continue to refuse to unite and organize, demanding better pay/respect commensurate with the level of education and responsibility they shoulder, they will only continue to work crappy hours, holidays, nights and weekends, passing out meds like a bandit as they max nurse/patient ratio.

close