Spanish

  1. Does your job require you to know it or prefer it? I see more and more post that require it (must be Bilingual)
  2. Visit wayemika profile page

    About wayemika

    Joined: Sep '14; Posts: 305; Likes: 103

    10 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Nope - though I'm in a multi-cultural area, I would have to be multi-lingual in order to be successful.

    We use an official translation line that can provide a transcript of the conversation.
  4. by   wayemika
    So it would be helpful but its not required
  5. by   juan de la cruz
    I'm in California and I do see postings here that states that specific language skills are preferred or required such as Spanish or maybe Cantonese. These jobs require providers who will work closely with immigrant communities who represent the specific language group so it makes sense to prefer someone who not only have an ability to speak the language of the patients but also know cultural mores that help with success as a provider.

    In our hospital, we see patients from all backgrounds so it doesn't make sense to require specific language skills only. We also have a 24/7 in-person Spanish translator. For other languages, we have a video language line and sometimes in-person translator depending on the time of day. We also offer a phone conversation test for providers who can speak another language to certify them to translate for their patients and not have to ask for a translator. I'm bilingual and took the test for my native language and got through with the bare minimum score to pass so it goes to prove how hard it is to translate medical information to non-English speakers.
  6. by   wayemika
    Quote from juan de la cruz
    I'm in California and I do see postings here that states that specific language skills are preferred or required such as Spanish or maybe Cantonese. These jobs require providers who will work closely with immigrant communities who represent the specific language group so it makes sense to prefer someone who not only have an ability to speak the language of the patients but also know cultural mores that help with success as a provider.

    In our hospital, we see patients from all backgrounds so it doesn't make sense to require specific language skills only. We also have a 24/7 in-person Spanish translator. For other languages, we have a video language line and sometimes in-person translator depending on the time of day. We also offer a phone conversation test for providers who can speak another language to certify them to translate for their patients and not have to ask for a translator. I'm bilingual and took the test for my native language and got through with the bare minimum score to pass so it goes to prove how hard it is to translate medical information to non-English speakers.
    What test did they have you take?
  7. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from wayemika
    What test did they have you take?
    Our institution has a Bilingual Clinician Certification Program and this involves a test developed by our Interpreting Services Department. The test is taken over the phone with pre-recorded scenarios asking the examinee to translate medical information to a patient or family member. The examinee's reponses are recorded and evaluated for accuracy in the translation and a final score is given.
  8. by   djmatte
    Quote from juan de la cruz

    In our hospital, we see patients from all backgrounds so it doesn't make sense to require specific language skills only. We also have a 24/7 in-person Spanish translator. For other languages, we have a video language line and sometimes in-person translator depending on the time of day. We also offer a phone conversation test for providers who can speak another language to certify them to translate for their patients and not have to ask for a translator. I'm bilingual and took the test for my native language and got through with the bare minimum score to pass so it goes to prove how hard it is to translate medical information to non-English speakers.
    The first sentence and the last are why many places won't even allow hospital staff to translate anymore...there's a huge liability risk. So far every place I've worked in healthcare over the past 8 years has mandated the use of translation services because they don't want to run the risk of some miscommunication.
  9. by   wayemika
    Quote from djmatte
    The first sentence and the last are why many places won't even allow hospital staff to translate anymore...there's a huge liability risk. So far every place I've worked in healthcare over the past 8 years has mandated the use of translation services because they don't want to run the risk of some miscommunication.
    This is very interesting to see. Thank you for sharing. What area of the country do you work in?
  10. by   djmatte
    Quote from wayemika
    This is very interesting to see. Thank you for sharing. What area of the country do you work in?
    Michigan.
  11. by   FullGlass
    I live in California and there are jobs that require bilingual providers. However, there is not a huge supply of those, so most places will provide translation services.
  12. by   traumaRUs
    I'm in IL and the large hospital system I just left required EVERYONE to use the official language line. We were not allowed to use family, employees. This was due to litigation reasons. The official language line provided a full transcript of all conversations.

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