Quick FNP/PNP Question - page 2

Couldn't a FNP also treat peds in a family practice or even ER setting? A PNP couldn't treat adults though, right? So it'd seem that there's no real advantage to being a PNP over a FNP.... Read More

  1. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from revolution
    Couldn't a FNP also treat peds in a family practice or even ER setting?

    A PNP couldn't treat adults though, right?

    So it'd seem that there's no real advantage to being a PNP over a FNP.
    PNP's treat patients up to 21 years of age. FNP's can work in the ER setting, but only the "fast track." Actually, I know a few ACNP's who work in the ER and they are only allowed to work in the fast track b/c the hospitals won't allow them to do anything more. This may be a regional thing though. However, ACNP's are limited to specific age groups and this can certainly be a problem. FNP's are usually the #1 choice for the ER fast track, since we can see patients of all ages, including OB patients.

    If a person only wants to work in pedes, I would highly suggest they become PNP's b/c they get much better training in that area. I would think and "hope" they would get paid more than a FNP if they are working in pedes. However, any specialty has limitations and the FNP definitely has the broadest scope of practice.
  2. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from emtneel
    Another thing is this. As a FNP I seriously doubt anyone would go back to get a PNP degree.
    But as a PNP you may seriously consider going back for FNP....

    It also depends on where you live.
    In colorado there are so many PNPs so its hard to get a job there, and i know the Children's hospital in Denver probably has mostly PNPs and would hire a PNP over a FNP.

    That being said I am a FNP and am working in a Peds hosp right now.

    i know i should work with adults but kids are so much more fun!! (and half of them are bigger and heavier nowadays anyways, and getting adult problems....)

    I also think for some (not all) Pediatric specialty jobs a PNP would be better, esp. for special needs kids. But say a FNP who was a cardiac RN, would prob. be a great peds cardio NP... its all a learning curve anyways.. That's whats great about our profession.. you can do soooo many different things!!!
    I'm curious as to how you're meeting the minimum practice hours for recertification. Both the AANP and ANCC require something like 1,000 hours of practice in your specialty...meaning treating patients of all ages in a primary care setting. Are you just going to retake the certification exam again?
  3. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from bayouchick02
    That's excatly how I feel!! I currently work nicu, but i am SERIOUSLY looking into the PNP role. I've asked this many times before, but I wonder if not having that peds experience prevent me from being a good PNP?? Also, i have been told by many that FNP would be the safer route b/c it is more marketable, but i have absolutely NO DESIRE to work with adults. I guess i am trying to say that I dont want to have to go thru school studying something i have no interest in when i can focus my enitre graduate school experience on children and babies (something I absoulutely love!!)
    Trust me, no one is going to care about your experience as a RN. Being an APRN is so very different from a RN, you can't even imagine. While I personally feel that every APRN should have experience as a RN, the best NP programs aren't requiring RN experience. This should tell you something...it doesn't matter!
  4. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from dansingrn
    During my PNP training, one of my preceptors was FNP first, then went back for PNP for more specialization. I work in a subspecialty where the peds developmental/behavioral background is a huge advantage. Advanced assessment, pathophysiology and pharmacology were all pediatric specific. If you want to do peds and you know you aren't going to do adult medicine (I agree wholeheartedly with you here jeepgirl!) then PNP makes sense. I considered FNP for a bit before I started for the marketability reason, but as I considered the curriculae, the FNP stuff filled me with dread - the PNP courses really excited me! My program had several courses that the FNPs didn't take. They did take similar courses, but were in the adult domain.
    In the peds hospital where I work, the PNP is valued for the specialty expertise, just as the NNPs are. There are a few FPNs here, but PNPs definitely have the advantage in this particular environment.
    If you think new FNP's have trouble in a pedes environment, then you should see them in an IM environment! I was trained in both Adult and Geriatric health and later went back to become a FNP b/c of job reasons. The new FNP's were blown away by the complexities of the older patients. I spent around 1,500 clinical hours in school, which is far more than any NP program out there...only b/c I completed 3 certifications. I will say this, I STILL feel "over my head" in the internal medicine arena. FNP's only get an overview of all those different areas, but they certainly aren't well trained in any of them. I'm thankful I had all those extra classes & clinical hours pertaining to geriatric patients b/c they are the most complicated by far!

    Another thing, you mentioned that you are working in a hospital setting and there are FNP's working there...is that allowed? What exactly are the FNP's doing in the hospital?
  5. by   MommyandRN
    This is a great discussion! My situation is this: I have adult RN experience ONLY and looking into NP programs. Although I have only adult experience, I love kids and really want to work in peds as a NP. I actually have only applied for some Family NP programs though, because of my background exp. I am hoping as a NP I can get a job in peds, and if not, then I have adults to fall back on. However, reading this thread makes me think I should just enter a PNP program? I didn't think I could get in because of a lack of peds background. Could I get into a PNP program with no peds exp???
  6. by   JDCitizen
    Quote from ANPFNPGNP
    If you think new FNP's have trouble in a pedes environment, then you should see them in an IM environment! I was trained in both Adult and Geriatric health and later went back to become a FNP b/c of job reasons. The new FNP's were blown away by the complexities of the older patients. I spent around 1,500 clinical hours in school, which is far more than any NP program out there...only b/c I completed 3 certifications. I will say this, I STILL feel "over my head" in the internal medicine arena. FNP's only get an overview of all those different areas, but they certainly aren't well trained in any of them. I'm thankful I had all those extra classes & clinical hours pertaining to geriatric patients b/c they are the most complicated by far!

    Another thing, you mentioned that you are working in a hospital setting and there are FNP's working there...is that allowed? What exactly are the FNP's doing in the hospital?
    I am a Family Nurse Practitioner and worked with an internal medicine / Nephrology group...

    Let’s see I have/worked with Family Nurse Practitioners in the ER, trauma, cardiology, and medical/surgical…..

    Complexities / blown away yep that is exactly what I heard from the students that where allowed to go straight into the MSN program without even one year of experience as a BSN. Sometimes it's also about what one has learned before a program that can help also. Notice the words sometimes....

    Education is of vital importance, structured standardized minimal requirements are necessary and important but neither can help if the person does not know his/her limits.

    I am thankful for all my degrees but I am also thankful for my certifications, focused CEUs and my persistence as well as the persistence of providers I have worked with to improve my training as well as list of procedures that I am allowed to do. I am thankful to know when to get backup...


  7. by   jeepgirl
    I believe that most PNP programs want at least one year of peds experience before application to the program. That was how my program was.

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