PAs Do Not Like Us

  1. New forum idea? - Professional PA General Discussion - Physician Assistant Forum

    I just thought this was funny. Poor PAs. Admittedly better training model but falling behind quickly...
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    About Dodongo

    Joined: Dec '12; Posts: 558; Likes: 1,206

    24 Comments

  3. by   Spadeforce
    Wow a whole forum haha
  4. by   elkpark
    "Funny," sure, but many of the comments (about large numbers of poorly prepared NPs flooding the market) are right on point.
  5. by   Dodongo
    Quote from elkpark
    "Funny," sure, but many of the comments (about large numbers of poorly prepared NPs flooding the market) are right on point.
    Totally. The problems NPs are facing (and creating) are not missed by PAs and MD/DOs.
  6. by   Spadeforce
    Not that med school curriculum is perfect but they do share a lot of the same teachers as we have in the in house PA program at my school. The np school is totally separate.

    Specialists teach their speciality stuff and they have dedicated pharmacists for pharmacology. They don't have dedicated PHDs tho like we do. Not that they all teach good anyway but you get the point
  7. by   InquisitiveAPN
    Quote from Spadeforce
    Not that med school curriculum is perfect but they do share a lot of the same teachers as we have in the in house PA program at my school. The np school is totally separate.

    Specialists teach their speciality stuff and they have dedicated pharmacists for pharmacology. They don't have dedicated PHDs tho like we do. Not that they all teach good anyway but you get the point
    No idea. Nursing did itself a professional disservice in alienating other healthcare disciplines and pushing this mantra of "nursing practice." For years, I've failed to identify what exactly it is that nurses believe to be a body of knowledge all to their own. Nurses are poorly trained and those poorly trained teach another generation of the same.
  8. by   Dodongo
    Quote from InquisitiveAPN
    No idea. Nursing did itself a professional disservice in alienating other healthcare disciplines and pushing this mantra of "nursing practice." For years, I've failed to identify what exactly it is that nurses believe to be a body of knowledge all to their own. Nurses are poorly trained and those poorly trained teach another generation of the same.
    The funny thing is all of my preceptors were physicians.
  9. by   Spadeforce
    Always felt the nursing mantra was a mix of sociology, psychology, and medicine-lite all put into a poorly constructed abomination of non originality
  10. by   FullGlass
    Quote from Spadeforce
    Not that med school curriculum is perfect but they do share a lot of the same teachers as we have in the in house PA program at my school. The np school is totally separate.

    Specialists teach their speciality stuff and they have dedicated pharmacists for pharmacology. They don't have dedicated PHDs tho like we do. Not that they all teach good anyway but you get the point
    You are making a blanket statement without any evidence. I went to Hopkins and we shared faculty with the medical school and the school of public health. We also had actual pharmacists from the hospital teach pharmacy courses. My preceptors included MDs, DOs, and NPs.

    Doctors aren't stupid. When considering hiring an NP or a PA, they are quite capable of looking at a resume and seeing what school the applicant went to, and they even know which schools are good schools!

    There are excellent NPs and crappy ones, too. The same is true of PAs and MDs.

    I'm also tired of people on this forum putting down the nursing mindset of NPs. An important part of healing is a therapeutic relationship and a holistic approach to caring for a patient. In my short experience, so far, I've seen many instances of MDs with terrible people skills who simply don't help patients for a variety of reasons: patient so upset with MD attitude that they never go back, patients who don't understand what the MD told them to do, MDs who prescribe very expensive medications w/o considering the patient's insurance or financial means, MDs who think they know everything and don't know when specialist referral is needed, etc.

    Talking to MDs, some of them prefer NPs and some prefer PAs. So there is work for everyone.

    I've now had exposure to new grad PAs and I don't think they are inherently better than NPs.

    NPs have full practice authority and can open their own practice in almost 1/2 of states and the V.A. and that is not true of PAs.
  11. by   Spadeforce
    Quote from FullGlass
    You are making a blanket statement without any evidence. I went to Hopkins and we shared faculty with the medical school and the school of public health. We also had actual pharmacists from the hospital teach pharmacy courses. My preceptors included MDs, DOs, and NPs.

    Doctors aren't stupid. When considering hiring an NP or a PA, they are quite capable of looking at a resume and seeing what school the applicant went to, and they even know which schools are good schools!

    There are excellent NPs and crappy ones, too. The same is true of PAs and MDs.

    I'm also tired of people on this forum putting down the nursing mindset of NPs. An important part of healing is a therapeutic relationship and a holistic approach to caring for a patient. In my short experience, so far, I've seen many instances of MDs with terrible people skills who simply don't help patients for a variety of reasons: patient so upset with MD attitude that they never go back, patients who don't understand what the MD told them to do, MDs who prescribe very expensive medications w/o considering the patient's insurance or financial means, MDs who think they know everything and don't know when specialist referral is needed, etc.

    Talking to MDs, some of them prefer NPs and some prefer PAs. So there is work for everyone.

    I've now had exposure to new grad PAs and I don't think they are inherently better than NPs.

    NPs have full practice authority and can open their own practice in almost 1/2 of states and the V.A. and that is not true of PAs.
    I was specifically talking about my Home school so yes it is correct. Why do I need data for this shibaowner?

    also I doubt nps are any more holistic overall than MD or DOs. Most schools have some sort of holistic mindset nowadays anyway.

    Nursing does not have a patent on holistic care lol
  12. by   traumaRUs
    Hmm...again its not an us (NPs, APRNs) against them (PAs, MDs, other APRN specialties)....rememmber its us against the patients!

    Lol - but really its not competition
  13. by   FolksBtrippin
    Quote from InquisitiveAPN
    No idea. Nursing did itself a professional disservice in alienating other healthcare disciplines and pushing this mantra of "nursing practice." For years, I've failed to identify what exactly it is that nurses believe to be a body of knowledge all to their own. Nurses are poorly trained and those poorly trained teach another generation of the same.
    Ouch.

    I was not poorly trained. I did have to learn a lot of stuff on my own, but I was well trained to start that process.

    I am a believer in nursing practice. I don't think it's ********.

    Nursing practice is not a separate body of knowledge. It's a different method of healing than the medical model. Medicine is about finding the source of disease in the person and eliminating it. That's very important.

    Nursing practice is about looking at the entire person including all the body systems, and the person's place in the community (family, work, society at large) and promoting health from that perspective. That is also very important.

    I am on my way to becoming a psych NP. I am not looking to be a lesser version of a doctor, but a nurse who also prescribes and orders labs, etc.
  14. by   Lipoma
    This whole debate looks oddly similar to how MDs not liking DOs initially. Then as time went on...the two put their differences aside.

    Let's hope it's the same for PAs and NPs.

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