Management favoritism to the other NP in my practice

  1. Management favors the other NP in the practice I work at. The manager lets the other NP get away with surfing the internet for half her day. I feel like that's letting her get away with too much, like the lazy NP is almost stealing from the practice.

    I'm the NP she goes to with extra projects because I am a hard worker that gets the job done right.
    The manger gives me more work / important time consuming projects and she's ok with the lazy NP barely getting stuff done. The only good thing that comes out of working harder is a good review at the end of the year WITHOUT a larger raise than the lazier NP.

    I've confronted her about including the lazy NP in the extra projects I do but her response is, "She's not good with computers, I have to work with her on that." Or "I have to work with her about her customer service."

    I love to negotiate raises, my first and second years at this clinic I treated the raise like applying for a new job, showing accomplishments, production, glowing reviews from patients, etc.. The manager insists her hands are tied when it comes to altering how much the raises are and how mobile I can be within the organization (a HEENT surgeon wanted me to join him). My manager has kept me in the same position and let me "expand my role" by giving me extra projects.

    I think there is also some reverse ageism. It seems the lazy older NP gets less work. Maybe she is afraid that if she gives older NP more work they will quit / retire (because she is almost there) or she's rewarding the older NP for not jumping jobs like younger people do.

    I feel like I'm ready to jump jobs, but in this economy, I don't want to go from bad job to worse job. And managerial favoritism is everywhere, right? Managers are human and it almost can't be avoided. Am I expecting too much? Is this normal in workplaces everywhere? Thanks in advance for your responses.
  2. Visit DucatiNP profile page

    About DucatiNP

    Joined: Apr '07; Posts: 44; Likes: 1

    7 Comments

  3. by   Gator FNP
    Start to look for another position. Take your time, find something that will work for you. You now know what will not work. During your interviews, find out who will be your supervisor, what will raises be based on.
    I had a similar experience at my last position, worked with a PA, who did not know what she was doing. The physicians in the practice (husband and wife) carried her, made excuses and would agree with what she did. Her experience was as an EMT, then 2 years PA program, no degree at all, only experience as an EMT in the emergency room. This practice was internal/family/pediatrics/pain mgt.
    I took 6 months to find a position that I would be happy with. I decided that the office setting was not for me any longer and looked for a position within a large hospital system. My hours are great now, I have medical/retirement benefits, nice time off, no w/e, no evenings, and respect.
    I am glad I took my time changing jobs. This was done during this recession. Not many positions available, but keep your eyes open.
  4. by   DucatiNP
    Thanks Gator,

    When your new employer asked, how did you word your bad situation into something constructive?

    And how many months or weeks notice did you give resignation to your old employer?

    Thanks.
  5. by   Gator FNP
    I had a contract that required 1 month's notice. This gave the hospital time to do all the background check, credentialing.
    I did not mention anything at my interview. I just stated that I was looking for something different, no w/e, no evenings. Therefore, the reason for my leaving was for these reasons and they understood completely.
  6. by   sunray12
    Quote from ducatinp
    management favors the other np in the practice i work at. the manager lets the other np get away with surfing the internet for half her day. i feel like that's letting her get away with too much, like the lazy np is almost stealing from the practice.

    i'm the np she goes to with extra projects because i am a hard worker that gets the job done right.
    the manger gives me more work / important time consuming projects and she's ok with the lazy np barely getting stuff done. the only good thing that comes out of working harder is a good review at the end of the year without a larger raise than the lazier np.

    i've confronted her about including the lazy np in the extra projects i do but her response is, "she's not good with computers, i have to work with her on that." or "i have to work with her about her customer service."

    i love to negotiate raises, my first and second years at this clinic i treated the raise like applying for a new job, showing accomplishments, production, glowing reviews from patients, etc.. the manager insists her hands are tied when it comes to altering how much the raises are and how mobile i can be within the organization (a heent surgeon wanted me to join him). my manager has kept me in the same position and let me "expand my role" by giving me extra projects.

    i think there is also some reverse ageism. it seems the lazy older np gets less work. maybe she is afraid that if she gives older np more work they will quit / retire (because she is almost there) or she's rewarding the older np for not jumping jobs like younger people do.

    i feel like i'm ready to jump jobs, but in this economy, i don't want to go from bad job to worse job. and managerial favoritism is everywhere, right? managers are human and it almost can't be avoided. am i expecting too much? is this normal in workplaces everywhere? thanks in advance for your responses.
    1) how can someone who surfs the net most of the day "not be good with computers" - assuming this means just using software interfaces - not repairing them, etc.

    2) in negotiating your past raises it could be that you reached the high end of your pay range if this is a larger organization. or if it's a small organization then you might be at the high end of what they can pay or that they are willing to pay you. ditto to what the others have said. if money is your primary issue then it sounds like you need to look for another job.
  7. by   DucatiNP
    Thanks Sunray,

    Your #1: Thanks for pointing that out. That just confirms Gator's response that the manager is making excuses for the lazy older NP.

    Your #2: I am in a larger organization and I probably am on the higher end of the pay range. But I don't think money is the primary issue (but it's always a main issue).

    I want to have trust in the management. I want to know the management will manage fairly, acknowledging brilliance and incompetence, hard workers and lazy people.

    I want my manager to reward excellent work with anything other than more work. Or if he/she cannot reward much, at least provide a transparent view of the next higher step of the "corporate ladder" (if that can apply in the medical field).

    Gator is right, I know what I want now and I'm going to find it.
  8. by   westcoastgirl
    it seems extremely unfair to me and how very odd, aren't there measures like patient volume or satisfaction that are applied to ALL providers including you and her? they should be, certainly.

    speaking as one who is always thrown more project and relied on to help other staff because of my skills, I make sure (politely and other times a little more assertively) I expect fair treatment, including negotiating extra time off for working on side projects and the like.

    it can be very demoralizing to work with lazy/incompetent people who're paid as much if not more than you. I doubt it's really about money per se, it's about the perception of unfairness and that's enough to make anybody upset.
  9. by   DucatiNP
    Thanks for your reply WestCoastGirl.

    About patient volume and satisfaction; the lazy NP sees about 8 patients a day, and does recieve complaints. The manager
    turns a blind eye to it.
    For volume, the Lazy NP actively seeks out new easy part time NP jobs while she's at work! One of the first things she says
    is, "I'm looking for a practice that's not too busy and slower paced." They hire her for some reason and let her go within 6
    months. This process repeats about once a year and she always says, "She has trouble keeping her patients".
    I'm thinking, "Wow, other managers know that patients to not want to see her, her patient volume is down and she is "let go"
    or all her hours are cut from that practice. What the hell is wrong with my manager!? My manager is turning a blind eye to
    her decreased patient volume for some reason.

    WestCoastGirl, you're right. This is very demoralizing and so unfair. Thanks for your reply.

close