First job woes

  1. Hey all. New AGACNP here and been looking for the "ideal" job for a couple months. Was wondering if anyone has any tips for negotiation or opinions of it for a new grad?

    I've been offered a position in a hospital surgical ICU group and honestly it is a job I really feel would help me grow into this career and I'd enjoy it. However, I can't see myself accepting the job and its responsibilities at the offered salary (less than 100k, 97k and change).

    I'm thinking of how to, respectfully, counter offer but wonder how it should be worded. Classmates of mine have received offers at other facilities in the same state for around 105k and one even greater then 115k.

    Opinions, ideas, or conversation?
  2. Visit ArmaniX profile page

    About ArmaniX, MSN, NP

    Joined: Dec '13; Posts: 244; Likes: 697

    41 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Are you the first NP with the group? Will you be hired by the group or hospital? Usually more able to negotiate with a group versus large hospital system.
  4. by   Jules A
    Any other job offers you can mention? I would also share the information you know about the person who was offered $115 if you are sure its solid and can name the facility. I've done that in the past with success. Regardless their offer is too low. Succinctly tell them a few the reasons you'd love to accept, feel you are a good fit but that you will require XYZ salary. Nurses, women in particular, seem uncomfortable to be proactive with salary negotiations and yet waiting around for an employer to read your mind or offer you a top rate isn't likely to happen so you need to become comfortable verbalizing your needs.
  5. by   ArmaniX
    Thank you for the responses. The offer of employment is via the hospital and not a select group. I would not be the first NP. I have other interviews with potential offers. This current offer does not include malpractice insurance (stated I would be covered under the hospital) and offered just $1,000 for CME. This role holds a lot of responsibility and risk (intubations/lines/chest tubes/drains). I doubt there is much wiggle room for negotiation, however, I personally feel the offer is incredibly low for what is expected of me and the risks involved. While I would love to start working in the NP capacity; I am not going to just accept any offer.
  6. by   aok7
    I immediately read that offer and thought it was too low. That said, you need to do what is right for you. If you think this will be an excellent learning experience for your goals, then you should embrace this and almost look at it as an extension of school. The salary is by no means demeaning, as I agree that as NPs we need to demand a fair package. Do what is best for you for a first job, and know that a few dollars more at another place might be a high price you'll end up paying in the bigger picture of opportunity. It's so personal.
  7. by   ArmaniX
    It was hard to say no but I feel it is important to be firm. I have three other locations where I am in the interview process so I will (hopefully) have upcoming options and can only hope that I wasn't too picky as a new grad.
  8. by   Jules A
    Quote from ArmaniX
    It was hard to say no but I feel it is important to be firm. I have three other locations where I am in the interview process so I will (hopefully) have upcoming options and can only hope that I wasn't too picky as a new grad.
    Either way chalk it up to an excellent learning experience. Its important to go into these situations with an idea of your worth. Would you mind to share how it went with the counter offer negotiations? It might be helpful for others who are embarking on this process. Best wishes with your upcoming interviews.
  9. by   ArmaniX
    Quote from Jules A
    Would you mind to share how it went with the counter offer negotiations? It might be helpful for others who are embarking on this process. Best wishes with your upcoming interviews.

    After the initial offer I noticed such things as malpractice insurance and CME were not mentioned in the phone conversation or in the offer; so I asked about - malpractice, CME, relocation assistance (90 miles away from my home), shift differential (as I was to be nights and was not sure if the offer included that), as well as rate for extra shifts.


    It took them several days to get that information to me. I was told the initial offer (97k) included the differential, I was told extra shifts were offered at a "flat rate" (but never given the rate), no additional malpractice insurance... just that I would be covered under the hospital as an "agent of the state" (not 100% sure what that actually means), and just $1,000 for CME.

    This is a hospital system so I didn't expect any kind of negotiation. I thanked them for the offer and stated how I appreciated the time the team took to interview and show me the campus. I then informed them that their offer was the lowest in the area by over $10,000. I listed neighboring facilities that I know offer more for a new grad. I again thanked them and stated that I could not accept the proposed offer as it currently stood.

    Not sure if my approach was right or not.. no real experience with negotiating. But their reply email thanked me for the salary feedback and told me to "let them know if things change." The ending statement made me laugh. It is what it is.

    I have two out of state in-person interviews scheduled and another in state. My current mission is to find expected new grad salary information for Baltimore and Atlanta (so if anyone has an idea for a hospital AGACNP, speak up!).
  10. by   not.done.yet
    It was good you were honest with them, but you didn't negotiate at all. You simply declined. Most places will not jump up and down saying "No, please don't go!". If you say you don't want it, they won't try to convince you otherwise.

    A negotiation is "I have been excited about this position and really want to come work with you. Here is what I need to make that happen. $XXX,000 salary with $XXX shift diff, $XXX minimum for CE, premium coverage for my personal liability insurance and $xxx per month for cell phone coverage, etc etc etc."

    Then you shut up and let them fidget. Once they have decided you are the person they want, they have to start allllllllllllll over again finding someone. Most aren't eager to do that and will bring their offer up a notch or two. I have never accepted a job without a counter offer regardless of the amount. They always come in within 15% of their bottom dollar. Even if they meet or beat my salary expectations, I counter offer. Once you are in the door the bumps in pay can be and usually are few and far between.

    I continue to be baffled about what is so scary about giving them a counter offer. It gives you a chance to emphasize they are your number one choice and to invite them to sweeten the pot. It also expresses clearly that you know and understand your value and that no matter how awesome they are, you expect to be fairly compensated.
    Last edit by not.done.yet on Jul 17
  11. by   Jules A
    Quote from ArmaniX
    It took them several days to get that information to me.
    Amazingly fast for a hospital.

    Quote from ArmaniX
    This is a hospital system so I didn't expect any kind of negotiation.
    Definitely don't assume this. At the hospitals where I work there is a $30,000-$50,000 annual difference in psych NP rates. This is not experience dependent it is what they are willing to accept.

    Quote from ArmaniX
    Not sure if my approach was right or not.. no real experience with negotiating. But their reply email thanked me for the salary feedback and told me to "let them know if things change." The ending statement made me laugh. It is what it is.

    I have two out of state in-person interviews scheduled and another in state. My current mission is to find expected new grad salary information for Baltimore and Atlanta (so if anyone has an idea for a hospital AGACNP, speak up!).
    For your first attempt I am impressed. Your approach was near perfect until the close which is the determining factor of an excellent salesman. Practice asking for the rate you want. I usually don't go in higher than what I will work for and instead tell them very soon in the process what my expected rate is. I'd consider losing the relocation reimbursement unless they actually advertised especially for a commutable distance and although some will offer malpractice reimbursement if they are providing it through the facility many don't reimburse for your personal policy.

    I have a friend who is a ACNP working in Baltimore. He said jobs aren't as plentiful as in past years, that wages are between $90,000-$130,000 and to stay away from the big names unless you want to function as a resident for resident pay.
  12. by   ArmaniX
    Quote from not.done.yet
    It was good you were honest with them, but you didn't negotiate at all. You simply declined.
    This is all very helpful. I appreciate your feedback. I was definitely in unfamiliar water. Next time. Thank you!
  13. by   ArmaniX
    Quote from Jules A
    Amazingly fast for a hospital.



    Definitely don't assume this. At the hospitals where I work there is a $30,000-$50,000 annual difference in psych NP rates. This is not experience dependent it is what they are willing to accept.



    For your first attempt I am impressed. Your approach was near perfect until the close which is the determining factor of an excellent salesman.... I have a friend who is a ACNP working in Baltimore. He said jobs aren't as plentiful as in past years, that wages are between $90,000-$130,000 and to stay away from the big names unless you want to function as a resident for resident pay.
    Thank you for the helpful advice and Baltimore tip. I'm sure I'll be needing it for my next offer.
  14. by   broughden
    Quote from not.done.yet
    It was good you were honest with them, but you didn't negotiate at all. You simply declined. Most places will not jump up and down saying "No, please don't go!". If you say you don't want it, they won't try to convince you otherwise.

    A negotiation is "I have been excited about this position and really want to come work with you. Here is what I need to make that happen. $XXX,000 salary with $XXX shift diff, $XXX minimum for CE, premium coverage for my personal liability insurance and $xxx per month for cell phone coverage, etc etc etc."

    Then you shut up and let them fidget. Once they have decided you are the person they want, they have to start allllllllllllll over again finding someone. Most aren't eager to do that and will bring their offer up a notch or two. I have never accepted a job without a counter offer regardless of the amount. They always come in within 15% of their bottom dollar. Even if they meet or beat my salary expectations, I counter offer. Once you are in the door the bumps in pay can be and usually are few and far between.

    I continue to be baffled about what is so scary about giving them a counter offer. It gives you a chance to emphasize they are your number one choice and to invite them to sweeten the pot. It also expresses clearly that you know and understand your value and that no matter how awesome they are, you expect to be fairly compensated.

    ALL of this ^^^^! 100%.
    I dont understand why negotiating for a higher salary is so scary. You can stick a tube down someone's trach but you cant politely say, "I'd love to come work with you but I need XYZ salary to do that"?

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