ARNP resumes, CV

  1. I have found the UCSF resume template resources very helpful, and based my RN resume on their template. Worked well so then I followed their template for ARNP resume like this one http://career.ucsf.edu/nurs/samples/cvapn4a.pdf

    A physician friend of mine showed me her and other physician resumes (some may have been CV I don't recall) for applications to jobs. She thought my ARNP one was incredibly brief at one page, hers was multiple pages and listed many many details I would not have included.

    I would like to update my resume, and now I'm a bit concerned about having the right type of document for potential employers. What have all of you found to work well? I would be applying for outpatient jobs in primary care for the most part, maybe a few specialties if the opportunity arises.
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    About westcoastgirl

    Joined: Sep '04; Posts: 171; Likes: 49
    Specialty: 10 year(s) of experience

    2 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    I didn't use a template per se. for my CV. I included all my publications (which I don't do on my resume), I included all my nursing experience, even going back to my LPN which I leave out on my resume, I included all my community activity (again I delete this on a resume) and I include my military service in more detail on my CV than my resume.

    In all, my resume is 2 pages and my CV is 4.
  4. by   core0
    Quote from westcoastgirl
    I have found the UCSF resume template resources very helpful, and based my RN resume on their template. Worked well so then I followed their template for ARNP resume like this one http://career.ucsf.edu/nurs/samples/cvapn4a.pdf

    A physician friend of mine showed me her and other physician resumes (some may have been CV I don't recall) for applications to jobs. She thought my ARNP one was incredibly brief at one page, hers was multiple pages and listed many many details I would not have included.

    I would like to update my resume, and now I'm a bit concerned about having the right type of document for potential employers. What have all of you found to work well? I would be applying for outpatient jobs in primary care for the most part, maybe a few specialties if the opportunity arises.
    The way I look at it, the physicians that are interviewed for a practice submit a CV. At this level any provider should also submit a CV. A provider is being evaluated not only on their clinical training but also the academic skill set. Practices look at a resume as something their clerical staff submits. A professional submits a CV (in my opinion).

    One of the best explanations of a CV (or anything in english for that matter) is Owl at Purdue. Here is their section on the CV:
    http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/641/01/

    The CV handbook mentioned there should be on everyone's bookshelf. Another good guide is this one:
    http://www.free-resume-tips.com/resu.../curriclm.html

    The CV also offers advantages over the resume in describing educational experience. Since there is no exact pattern its pretty common for PA students to highlight their various clinical rotations for example.

    Depending on what you have done before school your CV may only be 2-3 pages after graduation. Mine runs around 6 pages now with publications and clinical trials.

    The key to getting a job with the CV is the cover letter. Unlike a resume where the cover letter is just fluff, with a CV the cover letter is key to summarizing your qualifications and directing them toward areas of your CV that you want to emphasize.

    David Carpenter, PA-C

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