Am I limiting myself with FNP?

  1. I'm a hopeful candidate for FNP program in Houston, TX for the fall 2009. A friend and also hopeful stated the other day that she felt that she may be "limited" selecting FNP as her master's choice. To me, FNP is totally me...I'm med/surg/oncology, hands on and like the clinical aspect. I don't know if I'll really end up doing "womb to tomb" but at least I have numerous options to persue. I feel that I can go into multiple aspects including management and teaching. Basically, I want to set up my future!

    The "limitations" she brought up where that: 1. You can no longer work the floor/unit when you are an FNP (I guess money is a concern) 2. The course work...I'm not sure that she will be able to pull it off. Plus there could have been some other concerns that didn't spark as true problems to me...

    What is your take on this?

    Thanks in advance!
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    Joined: Apr '06; Posts: 35; Likes: 14
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    Specialty: Med-Surg/Pedi/ICU/Tele/Onc

    6 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    Personally I think FNP is the way to go. As to extra money, work an additional prn APN job. School is doable - I haven't done FNP but have done the MSN, post-MSN adult health CNS and it was okay.

    Good luck.
  4. by   tuckers19
    I think that if you don't want to limit yourself then the FNP is the way to go. Before school I was a pediatric neuro nurse. I've only wanted to work with the pediatric population so at first I thought about being a PNP. Well, after speaking with the nurse practitioner that works on our floor, she told me that she was able to do more with her FNP degree including work in pediatrics. Pretty much every specialty at my hospital has a nurse practitioner and the majority of them are FNPs (even the ones in the ED). The FNP scope of practice includes every one from babies, to kids, to adults, to the elderly and pregnant patitients. You still have the option of teaching, adminisration, and research to go along with it. I was able to get a job working at Kaplan teaching NCLEX review because of my master's degree. For me FNP was a win-win situation.
  5. by   core0
    Quote from tuckers19
    I think that if you don't want to limit yourself then the FNP is the way to go. Before school I was a pediatric neuro nurse. I've only wanted to work with the pediatric population so at first I thought about being a PNP. Well, after speaking with the nurse practitioner that works on our floor, she told me that she was able to do more with her FNP degree including work in pediatrics. Pretty much every specialty at my hospital has a nurse practitioner and the majority of them are FNPs (even the ones in the ED). The FNP scope of practice includes every one from babies, to kids, to adults, to the elderly and pregnant patitients. You still have the option of teaching, adminisration, and research to go along with it. I was able to get a job working at Kaplan teaching NCLEX review because of my master's degree. For me FNP was a win-win situation.
    While that may be true in your area, since the OP is from Texas, I will point out that Texas BON interprets scope of practice issues very strictly. They regard an FNP certification as qualification for ambulatory, outpatient primary care medicine. This will limit or exclude an FNP from working in an inpatient setting or even some ED settings. Their discussion can be found here (especially the second section of the FAQ):
    http://www.bon.state.tx.us/practice/...fpractice.html

    David Carpenter, PA-C
  6. by   UVA Grad Nursing
    I will add to what core0 states. More and more state BONs are limiting the scope of practice for primary care NPs (FNP, PNP, ANP, etc). It is more than just Texas now, and I expect more state BONs to make this change in the next few years.

    If you love outpatient (clinics, ambulatory care, preventative health, etc) for all age groups, then a FNP is an excellent choice. If you really love inpatient work (with its accompanying acuity and complexity), then a FNP may not be a good choice.
  7. by   sandnnw
    If you are open to choices, like varied experiences and do NOT want to specialize, then choose FNP. You can always go back for post-masters if you need to.

    I believe the FNP is the most marketable, esp for ERs and internal/family practices. You can literally work anywhere. I'd be leary of taking suggestions of ACNP for the ER, as other suggested, some states are becoming more choosy about your grad specialty.

    On the other hand, if you are set on a specialty, then go for it. A lot of transplant coordinators come from ANP/ACNPs. Hospitalists ANP/ACNPs as well. If you want to work in the ICUs, labs and such, then ACNP is the way to go.

    I wouldn't worry too much about limitations, but the wide open field with many forks in the road. I think you'll be surprised. Best of luck!
  8. by   JDCitizen
    Quote from core0
    While that may be true in your area, since the OP is from Texas, I will point out that Texas BON interprets scope of practice issues very strictly. They regard an FNP certification as qualification for ambulatory, outpatient primary care medicine. This will limit or exclude an FNP from working in an inpatient setting or even some ED settings. Their discussion can be found here (especially the second section of the FAQ):
    http://www.bon.state.tx.us/practice/...fpractice.html

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    It would seem that some programs are trying to adapt to states such such as Texas where the BON is restricting practice. At least two programs I know of, here in Georgia, are in communication with a program or programs in Texas; basically the communications has helped shape the FNP programs that have acute care and/or ER training involved... Maybe not a bad thing market demand and the state response to those demands especially since technology does usually move faster than law.

    Factors so many factors:
    - In hospital or not (office, clinic, floor etc., etc....)
    - Private, state, federal job
    - Schools programs and how they are shaped
    - BON what are they going to do in the future.

    I don't know how Texas made its decision to limit NPs in the hospital but I would guess it happened after there were more than a few working in the hospital envrionment.
    Last edit by JDCitizen on Apr 26, '09

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