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Nurse Practitioner vs Physicians Assistant

NP Students   (6,382 Views | 29 Replies)

1,183 Profile Views; 27 Posts

I'm in my junior year of nursing school and I am set on furthering my education to either be a PA or NP. Ideally, I would like to work with baby's. Possibly a Neonatal Nurse Practitioner. However, I would be happy being a Ped PA. What is everyone's opinion on being a NP versus a PA in regards to working with baby's?

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92 Posts; 3,088 Profile Views

Just remember, if you choose to be a PA make sure to never call it physicians assistant, lots of pa schools would chuck your application for that ;) however I think you are better set up for the NP (tho it's not impossible to become a PA from nursing) I couldn't tell you the difference between the two for that specialty tho.

Good luck in your ventures.

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27 Posts; 1,183 Profile Views

I'm not sure I follow your comment "lots of pa schools would chuck your application for that." Why wouldn't I say "Physicians Assistant" if that is indeed what the title is called?

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92 Posts; 3,088 Profile Views

Because it isn't plural, it's just Physician Assistant and believe me PA's will fight tooth and nail about that lol.

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27 Posts; 1,183 Profile Views

Thanks for the heads up! I'll watch how I word that then ;)

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392 Posts; 6,433 Profile Views

Also, I wouldn't write on your application "I want to work with baby's".....it's "babies" ;)

Good luck!

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anh06005 has 6 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Cardiac, Home Health, Primary Care.

1 Article; 762 Posts; 12,796 Profile Views

PA school will teach you about all ages in acute and primary care situations. If you're sure you prefer peds rather than adults I'd think either neonatal NP or pediatric NP. Maybe even dual certify and do both if you like older kids too. The more ages you can see the more marketable you will be. The more specific your track in school, though, the more knowledge you'll have in the area!

Warning: once you start working you may realize you like an area you didn't think you would. I always wanted to work peds when I got my RN but didn't want to deal with traffic and a long drive so worked on a cardiac step down unit and loved it. Moved to home health and loved it too (I HATED home health day in school). I'm finally FNP and was worried I'd get tired of seeing sinus infections and such. I've come to find the easy cases a relief!

MSN programs usually start with core classes that are shared among all tracks so you'd get a little time to decide 100% or change your mind if something turned out a way you didn't expect.

Good luck!

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27 Posts; 1,183 Profile Views

Hum, you must not have an iPhone to experience autocorrect.

However, I asked for advice on the difference between the two professions, not on my application. However, when I need advice on my application I will certainly ask you!

Thank you! :]

Edited by _iamkel
More info

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27 Posts; 1,183 Profile Views

Thanks so much for all of the great information. I have been in touch with a few different schools of my choice and they also basically told me that I still have time to decide what I wanted to do.

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ICUman has 5 years experience and specializes in Cardiac Cath Lab.

1,658 Posts; 54,115 Profile Views

Just remember, if you choose to be a PA make sure to never call it physicians assistant, lots of pa schools would chuck your application for that ;)

Why would they do that, when that is exactly what it is called? Your statement makes no sense to me. I doubt pronunciation in the "plural form" would make them throw your application out, but whatevs.

That is a professional title.

OP, you'd likely be best off as a neonatal nurse practitioner. You need to work as an RN in a newborn ICU for two years to become a NNP.

Edited by ICUman

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27 Posts; 1,183 Profile Views

One of the schools I was speaking with told me that I will need to have 2 years of experience in a level 3 neonatal intensive care unit before I would be able to move into the NNP program. My plan would be to work to get that experience and begin to take the core credits. Sounds like a logical way to do it to me.

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ICUman has 5 years experience and specializes in Cardiac Cath Lab.

1,658 Posts; 54,115 Profile Views

Myself and one of the neonatal nurse practitioners on this site have recently published an article that discusses working and practicing as an NNP in the real world. You will find a few other NNP's that have chimed in as well. It's a good resource.

Here is the link and I hope you find it helpful. https://allnurses.com/nurse-practitioners-np/nnp-outlook-971737.html

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