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Nurse opinions on "Birth Rape"

Ob/Gyn   (28,205 Views 67 Comments)
by EKUGRAD EKUGRAD (Member) Member

EKUGRAD has 42 years experience and specializes in Psychiatric / Forensic Nursing.

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You are reading page 2 of Nurse opinions on "Birth Rape". If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 160 Articles; 20,955 Posts; 189,480 Profile Views

Moved to OB/GYN nursing

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FolksBtrippin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

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To me this would only happen in an emergent situation to save the baby's life. A woman can say she doesn't want treatment for herself, bit for her unborn child? Hitting a murky area there. Especially if the fetus is viable.

The term rape is very misused here, and I find it offensive for women who have had to actually endure a rape.

A woman can, in fact, refuse treatment for her unborn child. That is her right.

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I really, REALLY oppose the use of the term "rape" in this context. I'm not really sure how often this happens, and if it comes from a non-nursing midwife site, they often view anything medical related to birth as "unnatural" and wrong. This sounds like fear mongering to me by lay midwives who either do not understand birth in a hospital context, or they severely oppose it and want women to fear hospital births so they can increase their services. That is what I took out of it.

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kidzcare has 5 years experience.

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As others have said, battery is a more appropriate term for this. To be rape, the act has to be both forcible and sexual. So unless there was sexual gratification to the person delivering the baby, the word rape does not fit.

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JadedCPN has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU.

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I think I have a hard time forming an opinion about "birth rape" because I have a hard time getting past the, what I consider to be, gross misuse of the word rape in this scenario. It appears to be a shock word that is used to draw people in and thus takes away from the legitimacy of the issue, much like NETY and so many other buzzwords. Birth battery, as others have stated, seems more appropriate.

That being said, birth battery is absolutely unacceptable. Even in emergency situations, there is always always time to quickly, simply, briefly explain basic things and consent. Period.

Edited by JadedCPN
typo

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For those suggesting that this isn't rape, the FBI's Uniform Crime Report (UCR) Summary Reporting System (SRS) defines forcible rape as The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.”

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As someone who has been raped, I find this incredibly insensitive to women and men who have gone through the actual horrors of rape. I also assume this is a term coined by midwives in order to try and insinuate that they will give more care than an OB/GYN doc. I gave birth years after my rape, and never once did I connect a finger or hand inside me to check for dilation as an assault. Most mothers assume child birth will go as planned and want it according to their birth plan; but in reality, it is very different. It isn't like you are going to get your hair done or nails done and expect the same service every single time and know what comes next. Please stop using the term "rape" and minimizing what has happened to those who have been on the other end of a man forcing his penis inside you for sexual gratification.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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As others have said, battery is a more appropriate term for this. To be rape, the act has to be both forcible and sexual. So unless there was sexual gratification to the person delivering the baby, the word rape does not fit.

Rape is usually not about sexual gratification.

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klone has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

3 Followers; 13,300 Posts; 114,928 Profile Views

For those suggesting that this isn't rape, the FBI's Uniform Crime Report (UCR) Summary Reporting System (SRS) defines forcible rape as The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.”

Thank you.

I find it interesting that if a woman was at a man's house and he forced his hand inside her vagina after she told him to stop and tried to get away, nobody would give a second thought to calling it rape. But if it's in a hospital bed and a physician or midwife is doing it, it's not.

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For those suggesting that this isn't rape, the FBI's Uniform Crime Report (UCR) Summary Reporting System (SRS) defines forcible rape as The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.”

Please find any example of the kind of medical violation in discussion here ever being prosecuted as rape. Anywhere. I'll wait.

Seems weird to appeal to authority for your definition when the same authority (the US government) has NEVER acted in accordance with your claim. Battery has long been the legal (and semantic) standard applied to these situations and I see zero reason to reframe this situation as rape.

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I am an L and D nurse. I do have those patients that crawl up the bed or clamp their legs. I never force an exam on them but calmly explain what I need to do.

I also dont agree with the birth rape phrase. And yes the woman is on display especially when pushing and about to deliver. I really dont know a way around this.

I am always very sensitive to a woman with past sexual abuse.

But I need to do what I need to do to ensure a safe delivery of baby and at the same time keeping momma healthy. I dont look at the vagina as a sexual organ during this time, it is simply the passage way for the birth of a child.

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I don't like the term rape for this because I think it has the potential to take away from actual rape victims but I know that this type of thing happens more than people may think.

I have had 3 kids but my first child at 21, I had no idea what to expect out of L&D. I picked a random OB who insisted I be induced at 39 weeks (no medical necessity) and out of ignorance I agreed because I was excited to see my baby. What unfolded was me going in at 0 cm, not at all ready to be induced, and having my Pitocin IV drip constantly titrated up in order to deliver in 12 hours. I remember my nurse talking quietly to another nurse about how she was concerned I would end up with a avoidable C section and the fact my baby kept having HR issues. At hour 12, I had only been pushing maybe 10-15 minutes? Nothing for a first time mom. My OB gave me a complete episiotomy, no warning, nothing. The look on my nurse's face when it happened was something else. I was told after by him it was because my BP was so high, it was emergent. I have no idea if that was true. Do I feel raped? Not in any way shape or form, at the time I didn't even really feel mad because the whole situation just had me perplexed. I wish more than anything that I would have prepared and educated myself on child birth before this because I didn't have the knowledge to even know episiotomies were a thing. I have scar tissue that has resulted in some minor numbness but other than a painful healing I didn't suffer any long term effects. This was in 2009 BTW.

I was prepared for my next 2 deliveries and discussed with my new OB group that I only wanted an episiotomy if 1) the alternative was a C section or 2) the baby's life was in danger (or mine). I never had one again after my first, even when my third baby's HR tanked so low and often they had the rapid response team in with me. I was only induced if it was warranted and I was given the time and space to actually labor and push on my own.

The best thing to prevent this is to empower mom's with the knowledge and advocate that they research their OBs before going blindly into a major medical event with them. I know when my friends get pregnant for the first time, I don't share my bloody episiotomy story, but just have a light discussion about seeking out reviews on their providers.

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