Team player

  1. I am on time, arriving at work usually 20 minutes before my shift starts. This gives me enough time to walk to the unit, put away my food, find my assignment, and take report at least 3 minutes early.

    Today, the nurse taking over for me eventually makes her way to take report 7 minutes after. I rush through, because we only get paid to a certain time, and after that it's on you. She says to me "You are being really hostile right now. I'm new, and this is all about teamwork. I need you to be a team player right now."

    I about lost it. My husband was called in for an emergency, my 10 year old is home alone, I want to get off work as quick as possible. Seven minutes late and the blame is falling on me? Oh hell no.

    "We would have more time for report if you were here to get report at 7am. I have something at home and I have to get to i"

    "Well, teamwork is best, so I need you drop the attitude"

    "I wasn't giving you attitude, I was giving you report. It may be quick, but that is facilitated by your tardiness"

    "No, you refuse to be a team player"

    Am I wrong here? She clocked in at 7 am and took her time to get report by seven freaking minutes, then blamed me for my rushed report. All patients stable, no real health or pertinent issues present. I clocked out 10 minutes later than usual, and she really thought she was in the right. What do you think?
  2. Poll: Is it okay to be late?

    • Yes

      0% 0
    • No

      89.47% 17
    • Depends on the situation

      10.53% 2
    19 Votes
  3. Visit missmollie profile page

    About missmollie, ADN, BSN, RN

    Joined: Dec '12; Posts: 848; Likes: 2,803

    19 Comments

  4. by   Coffee Nurse
    I don't know the circumstances of why she was late to report, but you could always have pointed out to her that part of being a team means showing up to relieve your teammate on time so they don't have to clock out late.
  5. by   llg
    My opinion: You were in the right and she was in the wrong.

    Also ... I strongly suspect she will be "trouble" in the long run. If this is her attitude and she keeps up this behavior, others will notice it and she will either bring herself down or get disciplined. In the meantime, be careful to stay out of the line of fire. You don't want to get caught up in the drama that will probably be coming her way (-- unless you are in a very strong political position in your unit and it is your role to be an "enforcer.")

    Question: When you clocked out 10 minutes late, did you write down the reason you were leaving late? I would have. I would have left a note in the timekeeper system saying something like: "Relief was not ready to start report until ___"
    Last edit by llg on Jul 17
  6. by   caliotter3
    We are to report ten minutes prior to start of shift to receive report when we are relieving another nurse in extended care home health. Almost universally, I am never relieved on time. My employer defended the nurse who would come as late as 42 minutes after the start of her shift. They expected to pay her for the 42 minutes I had to remain with the patient while she dawdled getting to work. Any time I make a mention of being relieved late, I am held in poor regard by my employers. However, the clients know when nurses are supposed to arrive, and they have remarked that I always get to work on time. Since there is no time clock involved, and I don't like being unemployed, I try to keep my mouth shut as much as possible. It keeps my paycheck coming in. So, in the long run, you are not alone by any means.
  7. by   Been there,done that
    I was always ready to take report on the dot. It's common courtesy to our co-workers and administration does NOT want to pay overtime.

    This nurse is aggressive and late to report... when she is new? She will hang herself soon enough. In the meantime, ignore any comments about team work, etc. When you clock out late, be specific about the reason. Report your late punch to the supervisor and mention her name every time.

    Best of luck with this mess.
  8. by   JKL33
    Quote from llg
    My opinion: You were in the right and she was in the wrong.

    Also ... I strongly suspect she will be "trouble" in the long run. If this is her attitude and she keeps up this behavior, others will notice it and she will either bring herself down or get disciplined. In the meantime, be careful to stay out of the line of fire. You don't want to get caught up in the drama that will probably be coming her way (-- unless you are in a very strong political position in your unit and it is your role to be an "enforcer.")

    Question: When you clocked out 10 minutes late, did you write down the reason you were leaving late? I would have. I would have left a note in the timekeeper system saying something like: "Relief was not ready to start report until ___"
    Excellent. ^

    With regard to the OP, I agree you were not out of line. The only thing I would do differently is to not bring the conversation to "me" at all. I hate to give people the slightest opening to make their problem look like it's partially about me ["She was all b-y and on edge because of personal problems at home, not my fault"]. Not sure exactly what I would've said, probably something like, "I'm not sure what's going on with the tardiness and now the accusations, but I am not entertaining this conversation. This has nothing to do with me."

    Anyway - she will sort herself out, or she will be sorted out. Remain pleasant; don't get down and roll in the mud with her...
  9. by   kp2016
    I once worked with a nurse who informed me that "we work as a team around here so as you aren't doing anything right now you have to help me". It seemed to me that she was more than capable of doing the task herself but it was my first shift with this person (I was routinely on a different shift pattern) so I helped her with the entire task. Later in the same shift I ask her to help me with a quick patient turn, she informed me that she couldn't as she was going to have her break and that I would have to do it myself. About an hour later, after her break I asked her to help me with a transfer, she told me that it was my job and I should do it myself. Just to check towards the end of the shift I ask for a quick hand to do a task that she actually should have done and was told to do it myself. Gotcha
    The next shift she comes to me and "reminds" me that we are a team and that I should have come to help her as she had already told me that we are a team and I have to help. I calmly told her that teams work together and I had been a team player and helped her the previous shift and she had refused to help me and refused to be a team player so I would not be helping her again. She immediately reported me to the shift supervisor who told her that what I said was fair and left.
    I arrived for my third shift to have the Unit Manager tell me she wanted to speak to me in her office. RN was already seated in the office. The manager started with how disappointed she was in me and that "we are a team" and she expects me to help my team. I then explained to her that I agree which is why I was being a team player and how RN had repaid me by refusing to help me, 3 separate times. Not sure what happened after that as The Manger told me I could go now and to close the door on my way out. The RN made a point of not speaking to me unless required to after that, which suited me just fine.
    You did the right thing. It is important to stay calm and always politely and firmly speak up for yourself in situations like this and don't hesitate to tell your manager exactly what happened. The crap that some "professionals" will pull if you allow them to is unbelievable.
  10. by   traumaRUs
    Moved to Pt/Colleague relations.

    IMHO - I would definitely say you are in the right. I'm extremely punctual, usually very early to anything and everything. Can't abide late folks because it just shows a total disregard for others.
  11. by   Davey Do
    Quote from missmollie
    What do you think?
    I think it is good that I express myself through my art because otherwise I might be tempted to treat the chronically entitled tardy employees like this:

    late-png
  12. by   Jedrnurse
    Quote from kp2016
    I once worked with a nurse who informed me that "we work as a team around here so as you aren't doing anything right now you have to help me". It seemed to me that she was more than capable of doing the task herself but it was my first shift with this person (I was routinely on a different shift pattern) so I helped her with the entire task. Later in the same shift I ask her to help me with a quick patient turn, she informed me that she couldn't as she was going to have her break and that I would have to do it myself. About an hour later, after her break I asked her to help me with a transfer, she told me that it was my job and I should do it myself. Just to check towards the end of the shift I ask for a quick hand to do a task that she actually should have done and was told to do it myself. Gotcha
    The next shift she comes to me and "reminds" me that we are a team and that I should have come to help her as she had already told me that we are a team and I have to help. I calmly told her that teams work together and I had been a team player and helped her the previous shift and she had refused to help me and refused to be a team player so I would not be helping her again. She immediately reported me to the shift supervisor who told her that what I said was fair and left.
    I arrived for my third shift to have the Unit Manager tell me she wanted to speak to me in her office. RN was already seated in the office. The manager started with how disappointed she was in me and that "we are a team" and she expects me to help my team. I then explained to her that I agree which is why I was being a team player and how RN had repaid me by refusing to help me, 3 separate times. Not sure what happened after that as The Manger told me I could go now and to close the door on my way out. The RN made a point of not speaking to me unless required to after that, which suited me just fine.
    You did the right thing. It is important to stay calm and always politely and firmly speak up for yourself in situations like this and don't hesitate to tell your manager exactly what happened. The crap that some "professionals" will pull if you allow them to is unbelievable.
    I wonder if the lack of insight/hypocrisy on the part of this co-worker is that, or if they've got sociopathic tendencies. (Manipulating the "team" mantra when it benefits them and only them, and seeing nothing wrong with leaving you hanging. Oh, and reporting you for not being at their beck and call...)

    Sometimes I lose faith in people.
  13. by   missmollie
    I was pulled to the floor, and I have the feeling this nurse has a reputation for being late. She was in the break room at 7:04, and didn't even come out to me until 7:07. She then had to print her report sheets and took her sweet time doing it.

    Thanks for letting me vent and for giving me feedback. Davey do, I loved your comic because that is how I felt.
  14. by   caliotter3
    I've seen it mentioned where people give report to the floor manager, charge nurse, honcho, and then leave. Or, write out report on a piece of paper and leave it, then clock out. However, I'll bet these tactics usually don't go over too well. Unless the management makes it a priority to make EVERYONE start work on time, there will always be those of us who get the short end of the stick while others enjoy doing as they please, whenever they please.
  15. by   dontbetachy90
    Quote from Jedrnurse
    I wonder if the lack of insight/hypocrisy on the part of this co-worker is that, or if they've got sociopathic tendencies. (Manipulating the "team" mantra when it benefits them and only them, and seeing nothing wrong with leaving you hanging. Oh, and reporting you for not being at their beck and call...)

    Sometimes I lose faith in people.
    Manipulation is key here. I work with a nurse (call her Miss True, because nothing she says is true) who TELLS ME what I will do to help her, especially when I am charge nurse. "I'm gonna need you to do this ultrasound IV." "My patient needs a boxed lunch, I kind of don't got time to get her one so I'm gonna need you to." "You're going to go in there with me to talk to this family about code status." There was a time I was watching another nurse's patients while she was on lunch and I went to assess a patient who was crying out in pain. The nurse heard the cries from the break room and came in to see what was going on. Then, in walks Miss True, coming to save the day as always and push my incompetent self aside. When the patient was crying and speaking intelligibly, Miss True looked me square in the face said, "She told you to go away" in a rude, flat tone.

    I do my best to be respectful to all, and make it a point to ask each person how they are doing and if they need help on any of my shifts, especially when I am charge. As rude as that nurse is, I still ask if she's doing okay and offer help (and follow through, of course) when things get hairy. Like someone else said, don't get down and roll in the mud with them, but don't let them walk all over you, either. Take note when they are unfair, condescending, and rude; when the final straw has been reached, you will have an arsenal to help plead your case. I have yet to go to my manager because I haven't felt so totally violated by her petty behaviors, but I can imagine there will come a day. Work relations are such a drag sometimes.

close