My preceptor is everything they taught us NOT to be... - page 11

I was hired on a med-surge floor, and have been working with a preceptor for several weeks. After questioning some of the things she is "teaching" me, I've been given a "final warning" and am facing... Read More

  1. by   MarkStallbaumer
    Suck it up, don't rock the boat and go along with your preceptor. When you are free to practice on your own, do what you know is the correct way to do it. You will get into your own groove and know that you are doing things correctly. Not sure why you have a preceptor that is less than a year out of nursing school. That is almost like the blind leading the blind.
  2. by   mrclark0000
    First of all you have a preceptor with only One years experience??!! I had to wait until I had 4 years experience. The management is very poor at your hospital.
    You have had an unfortunate experience to have had such a bad preceptor.
    I'd quit before I was fired. Heck I'd run out of that hospital so fast I would break the sound barrier!
    The actions you've described are Wrong. Of you follow the preceptors instructions you'll have a lawsuit or loss of your license.

    I've 26 years experience and let me tell you, run and find somewhere else to work. Don't " sick it up" and stay. It won't be worth the trouble.
    Last edit by mrclark0000 on Dec 23, '15 : Reason: Saw another comment
  3. by   mrclark0000
    Really? So don't be a good nurse, don't rock the boat? Are you a nurse or a politician? What I gathered from the post was:
    1. A Bad Preceptor.
    2. A Manager that doesn't listen to the genuine concerns that a new nurse has brought forth.

    Either one of these is a cause for concern. Togeather they spell disaster.
    Either the manager is close friends with the preceptor, and doesn't want to "rock the boat" with the friend by avoiding enforcement of good nursing practice standards, or the manager is incompetent and can't discipline the preceptor.

    I agree that a year is way too short for a nurse to be a preceptor.
    Last edit by mrclark0000 on Dec 23, '15
  4. by   NanikRN
    ---NM
    Last edit by NanikRN on Dec 23, '15
  5. by   LucyRNPRI
    First of all commend you for taking responsibility for being a nit picker. I agree you are nitpicking because you really do have to start realizing you are in the real world, not nursing school and not the nclex world. That world only exists in the professors mind. As far as preceptors go, I know them oh so well, and yes she sounds like a Oh I am cool, I have been doing this a year now, I am a pro, let me eat the young. I hate that mentality with a passion, and trust me she will get you fired before you get started because trust me the manager is on her side. You are the newbie on the block and they will see you only as a trouble maker and non compliance. Welcome to the doggy dog world of Nursing. You find out why I have formed my independent Nursing business. I am sick of the disrespect from fellow nurses and upper management and corporate America. You will find everyone thinks they are the perfect nurse and follow all the rules. Don't be that nurse. because in the real world there is no such thing as being the perfect nurse. You are overworked, they put so many demands on you, it Impossible to do things exactly correct and on time. The only way that can be done is when you don't go above and beyond. Think outside the box and yes I agree with you patient first, charting can wait. I truly don't envy you being a new nurse. I put in my time on a med/surg floor. Just keep your nose clean, listen to your preceptor because God knows she is perfect and knows it all. Let her think so. Once you are on your own you can establish who you are and your own way., not her way. I get so sick of these self righteous know it all people. Anyway that I my issue..LOL. you can tell I have been burned by them in my past. I have precepted and New grads or student nurses would ask to be with me, You know why because I provide a learning environment and don't roll my eyes, and allow for mistakes, and know that I was a new grad once and a student nurse once. I never forget my routes. I dislike people who get all caught up in their status and forget where they came from. And that is all I have to say about that. I do agree with the reply from remotfuse .
  6. by   LucyRNPRI
    Great Advice and spot on!
  7. by   Cnrundle
    I have been a progressive cardiac care nurse for 4 years, in a leading cardiac hospital, and was a Tech for 6 years prior to that. I frequently precept new grads and expierenced nurses to my unit, although I think I'm still a "new" nurse. I also serve in a relief charge position and sit as chair of our shared governance committee, so I feel I have a little to say about this. First, I agree with a previous post that you should be receiving weekly feedback on your progress, discussing your weaknesses, and plan of action moving forward; this should also be a time where you can discuss concerns openly with all parties involved present, and not feel persecuted. Second, if you feel your learning style is extremely different from your preceptors teaching style, you should also be allowed to request a different preceptor. Third, you should feel comfortable questioning your preceptor and asking for clarity in how/why he or she completes a task a particular way; however, do so privately, not in a patient's room and be polite. For example say something like "I'm not exactly sure why you didn't use sterile technique during that dressing change. Could you help me understand?" In our facility each employee has access to all policies and procedures online. If this is so for you, maybe pull and review policies before raising questions. One thing I ALWAYS teach my preceptees is to ALWAYS trust your instinct, your gut feeling. Learn your organization's chain of command and use it, create a binder of policies and frequently used order sets for reference, and know there will never be a day as a nurse that you're not learning something. I know, personally, one of the hardest things to learn was delegation of task. Of course you will help a patient to the restroom, or get set up for a meal but if they need some new socks or want to get washed up, ask an aide to assist them or work out a schedule with the patient that will better work for the both of you, so you may assist. I feel everyone eventually finds their own method to the madness, as I'm sure you will. I wish you the best of luck in your future endeavors!
  8. by   jimmyalvin
    I don't have time to give a full reply now, but... there are a couple practice issues with your preceptor, however, *you* were in the wrong on several of those examples above and you really need to let the small stuff slide or you are going to drive your self crazy and more importantly not be successful as a nurse. I have multiple issues with some of your examples, but the biggest one - that dressing change did not need to be sterile unless the facility policy required it. I have never done a truly sterile dressing change in 5 years - nor have I been required to. You're not in a BICU.
  9. by   Txldy
    Being a preceptor is teaching a person who will eventually be working with you as part of the team on your shift. You are responsible for the competency of that person, building a good colleague and possibly a friend. Hostility and condescension will do you absolutely no good.
  10. by   Txldy
    I couldn't agree more.
  11. by   StudentAmie
    I admit I haven't read all the comments, but I find it disturbing how many people have dismissed the dressing change as "it's not a sterile procedure". Maybe not, but you absolutely need to wash hands and change gloves between dirty/clean dressing. Ew. I also think the fact that many posters closed rank and said it was this new nurse's attitude vs. poor practice was the real issue at hand speaks volumes about the reason it is said we eat our young.
  12. by   MunoRN
    Quote from StudentAmie
    I admit I haven't read all the comments, but I find it disturbing how many people have dismissed the dressing change as "it's not a sterile procedure". Maybe not, but you absolutely need to wash hands and change gloves between dirty/clean dressing. Ew. I also think the fact that many posters closed rank and said it was this new nurse's attitude vs. poor practice was the real issue at hand speaks volumes about the reason it is said we eat our young.
    Washing hands and changing gloves is part of "clean technique", not "sterile technique" which is why the claim that dressing changes are always sterile procures was correctly dismissed.

    "Eating our young" does not refer to legitimate criticism. Correcting incorrect beliefs is a normal and expected part of what we do, lateral hostility is a very different thing.
  13. by   Txldy
    Ok, I will say it. It might "just" be c clean dressing, but take your nasty dirty gloves off and wash your hands before you replace it.

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