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Not easy being a nurse - Victorville Daily Press

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victorville daily pressnot easy being a nurse

patricia green sobers up her students before she lets them into victor valley college’s nursing program.

“it’s something really different from what you’ve experienced,” green said. “it will put a lot of stress on you and your family, so you need to be really prepared.”

because of the incredible demands placed on community college nursing students statewide, 25 percent of them do not make it to

graduation, said a report issued this week.

according to elizabeth g. hill of the nonpartisan legislative analyst office, nursing school dropouts are among the more preventable causes of the state’s worsening shortage of qualified nurses.

hill’s report forecasts the state shortage will increase to 12,000 registered nurses by 2014, and it calls for “completion bonuses” to encourage schools to improve their graduation rates, an idea that green said she thinks could work.

but for current and prospective students of victor valley college’s nursing program, there is good news — the school boasts an 88 percent graduation rate that is well ahead of the state average.

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more... not easy being a nurse - victorville daily press

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Brian has 16 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in CCU, Geriatrics, Critical Care, Tele.

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Very Interesting article and video clip.

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Although valuable and insightful, we all know that until you begin the process and work it every day, you can't get anyone to understand, TRULY the stressers and challenges that lay ahead......

... We learned the 52 steps to make a bed, but never how to manage 10 patients, 2 of which are too acute to be there, one other crashing... Two other docs that won't give adequate pain meds, another that won't call you back, three irate different families... all at the same time during visiting, one frequent call bell patient who insists on the RN to raise and lower her head... stat meds and labs left from day or night shift and charting requirements that take up a full 12 hours which leave no time for care, but the facility concern is that it IS CHARTED, not that it is done.

I fear our students are well aware of what we face, they're smart enough to get out sooner than later as they learn this quickly. I feel that the intrinsic problem is in the profession, our lack of support and lack of back up that turns away promising qualified individuals into the profession... we're not building fighters into our every day lives in the schools and this ill prepares them for the "war" that takes place to provide quality care.

Our young are now leaving way before our burnt out attitudes "eat them"..... We don't teach our young survival skills to fight back and sustain as we have. Here is WHERE we have failed. But we need to find the stamina in ourselves first. The wheel is round... I swear it.

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NRSKarenRN has 40 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Vents, Telemetry, Home Care, Home infusion.

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So true:

"The textbooks in the nursing program are very high-level. The students aren't prepared to do the kind of high-level reading that's required," she says.

Math, for example, is a subject nurses must excel at in order to read charts and calculate dosages. But many enter the program without the requisite math skills, and because the program is so intensive, there isn't much time for remedial classes.

"We're finding out we can't start remediating a student in math or sciences once they are in the program," Green says. "All we can do is give students some extra guidance."

Green says she thinks one of the best ways to reduce dropouts is to institute assessment tests for prospective nursing students-a proposal that is presently making its way through the California Legislature.

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1,982 Posts; 33,563 Profile Views

Although valuable and insightful, we all know that until you begin the process and work it every day, you can't get anyone to understand, TRULY the stressers and challenges that lay ahead......

... We learned the 52 steps to make a bed, but never how to manage 10 patients, 2 of which are too acute to be there, one other crashing... Two other docs that won't give adequate pain meds, another that won't call you back, three irate different families... all at the same time during visiting, one frequent call bell patient who insists on the RN to raise and lower her head... stat meds and labs left from day or night shift and charting requirements that take up a full 12 hours which leave no time for care, but the facility concern is that it IS CHARTED, not that it is done.

I fear our students are well aware of what we face, they're smart enough to get out sooner than later as they learn this quickly. I feel that the intrinsic problem is in the profession, our lack of support and lack of back up that turns away promising qualified individuals into the profession... we're not building fighters into our every day lives in the schools and this ill prepares them for the "war" that takes place to provide quality care.

Our young are now leaving way before our burnt out attitudes "eat them"..... We don't teach our young survival skills to fight back and sustain as we have. Here is WHERE we have failed. But we need to find the stamina in ourselves first. The wheel is round... I swear it.

I have said it before and I will say it again. There is not enough time in the ADN program, and probably the Diploma programs, as well, to adequately prepare new grads for the realities of bedside nursing. And there is not enough time to arm them with the "survival skills", that will make their jobs more tolerable. There is not enough time, and we are not preparing "fighter" with the knowledge, and skills that they will need to survive the realities of working as a bedside nurse. The hospitals have their law firms, to be little us. What does the nursing profession have? Out state boards of nursing, the ANA?

In our haste to solve the "nursing shortage", we are allowing our profession to turn into a "revolving door" of inexperienced new grads. Schools are turing out thousands of new grads a year, only to have them leave within 4- 6 years in disgust. They may be able to accomplish the technical skills needed to be a nurse, but have none of the survival skills needed to survive, and fight back, with the laws that this country has not yet revoked, and watered down, due to pressure from the AHA, Nursing home industry, and the insurance companies.

The survival skills that are needed, but not taught, are Employment Law, Administrative Law, Insurance Law, Independant Contracting, Assertiveness Training, to name a few. Also, classes on starting a business, would give new grads the confidence to go out on their own, so they do not end up as "indentured servants, to their employer. In other words, nurses need to learn the skills that other health care professions have been learning for the last 25 years, to bring them away from the concept of having to work as an employee, and being a self employed medical professional. They added these classes, and increased their entry into practice when DRGs came into play and they had to validate their worth and presence at the patients' bedside. It also clarified their knowledge and contribution to patient outcomes, and care, from what is offered by lesser educated individuals.

We learned none of this in ADN programs, or Diploma program. We were too busy learning how to make beds, give meds, assessments, nursing skills, to learn how not to be bullied, harrassed, targeted, and what our rights were as employees. I am not knocking the stuff that is learned in school, but other professions made the choice to sacrifice technical skills, to learn what was needed under the new rules of health care. Internships were started after graduation to ease the transition from student to professional. It has only enhanced thier worth at the bedside, and their control of their profession.

Nurses, on the other hand, continued to make "daddy" happy, and continue to turn out more nurses every year, and only to watch them leave due to the intolerable working conditions, low pay, and benefits, and complete lack of respect for our profession.

There is just not enough time in a two year ADN program, or 2- 3 year diploma program to teach these needed skills. The lack of survival skills is adding to the nursing shortage by new grads, who see the powerlessness, and stress, of bedside nursing, and are leaving at even before the ink is dry on their diplomas.

Of course, this is exactly what the hospitals want. Nurses leaving early in their professional career don't cost the hospital for pensions, workmans comp, when they are injured on the job, and leave their higher salaries for a newer nurse, who can then be hired at several dollars an hour less.

If you don't believe me, just look outside the box, at the BIG PICTURE. I challenge ANYONE to tell me that I am wrong, and I am just an alarmist, and overreacting. I have been at the game called nursing, since 1975.

We are being disempowered, de skilled, deprofessionalized, and disenfranchised by the hospital industry, and WE have no plan, power, or ally to get us out of the hole we have dug ourselves.

Something needs to give, and nurses need to take control, accountablity, and responsibility, or we will not have a profession to fight for.

Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN

Spokane, Washigton

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GadgetRN71 has 10 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Operating Room.

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I have said it before and I will say it again. There is not enough time in the ADN program, and probably the Diploma programs, as well, to adequately prepare new grads for the realities of bedside nursing. And there is not enough time to arm them with the "survival skills", that will make their jobs more tolerable. There is not enough time, and we are not preparing "fighter" with the knowledge, and skills that they will need to survive the realities of working as a bedside nurse. The hospitals have their law firms, to be little us. What does the nursing profession have? Out state boards of nursing, the ANA?

In our haste to solve the "nursing shortage", we are allowing our profession to turn into a "revolving door" of inexperienced new grads. Schools are turing out thousands of new grads a year, only to have them leave within 4- 6 years in disgust. They may be able to accomplish the technical skills needed to be a nurse, but have none of the survival skills needed to survive, and fight back, with the laws that this country has not yet revoked, and watered down, due to pressure from the AHA, Nursing home industry, and the insurance companies.

The survival skills that are needed, but not taught, are Employment Law, Administrative Law, Insurance Law, Independant Contracting, Assertiveness Training, to name a few. Also, classes on starting a business, would give new grads the confidence to go out on their own, so they do not end up as "indentured servants, to their employer. In other words, nurses need to learn the skills that other health care professions have been learning for the last 25 years, to bring them away from the concept of having to work as an employee, and being a self employed medical professional. They added these classes, and increased their entry into practice when DRGs came into play and they had to validate their worth and presence at the patients' bedside. It also clarified their knowledge and contribution to patient outcomes, and care, from what is offered by lesser educated individuals.

We learned none of this in ADN programs, or Diploma program. We were too busy learning how to make beds, give meds, assessments, nursing skills, to learn how not to be bullied, harrassed, targeted, and what our rights were as employees. I am not knocking the stuff that is learned in school, but other professions made the choice to sacrifice technical skills, to learn what was needed under the new rules of health care. Internships were started after graduation to ease the transition from student to professional. It has only enhanced thier worth at the bedside, and their control of their profession.

Nurses, on the other hand, continued to make "daddy" happy, and continue to turn out more nurses every year, and only to watch them leave due to the intolerable working conditions, low pay, and benefits, and complete lack of respect for our profession.

There is just not enough time in a two year ADN program, or 2- 3 year diploma program to teach these needed skills. The lack of survival skills is adding to the nursing shortage by new grads, who see the powerlessness, and stress, of bedside nursing, and are leaving at even before the ink is dry on their diplomas.

Of course, this is exactly what the hospitals want. Nurses leaving early in their professional career don't cost the hospital for pensions, workmans comp, when they are injured on the job, and leave their higher salaries for a newer nurse, who can then be hired at several dollars an hour less.

If you don't believe me, just look outside the box, at the BIG PICTURE. I challenge ANYONE to tell me that I am wrong, and I am just an alarmist, and overreacting. I have been at the game called nursing, since 1975.

We are being disempowered, de skilled, deprofessionalized, and disenfranchised by the hospital industry, and WE have no plan, power, or ally to get us out of the hole we have dug ourselves.

Something needs to give, and nurses need to take control, accountablity, and responsibility, or we will not have a profession to fight for.

Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN

Spokane, Washigton

Just so the news is not all bad-some of us newbies are fighters already and are willing to fight the good fight. Interesting, but I have already been talked to about my "attitude" I do not swear at people, or treat patients or coworkers like crap. Rather, they think that a new nurse doesn't have the right to call it like she sees it or to have an actual opinion on something. I'm also a firm believer that we, as nurses, should make this shortage work in our favor. Travel nursing, here I come!

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According to Elizabeth G. Hill of the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst Office, nursing school dropouts are among the more preventable causes of the state’s worsening shortage of qualified nurses.

Nah ... there's no nursing shortage in California. There's just a shortage of nurses who want to work for less money.

Don't get me wrong ... hospital pay has improved, mostly due to unions. But you can still do better. As of this weekend, the California Department of Corrections has a waiting list of 3,200 RN's who applied for jobs. Why?

They're paying a good $10 an hour or more than what RN's can make in most hospitals. And the benefits are a hellava lot better. While hospitals scream shortage ... RN's are having to fight and compete with dozens of applicants for the higher paying state corrections jobs.

Of course the hospital CEO's are whining about having to compete with the state pay raises but ... tough. We're not here to subsidize CEO profits. Nurses are going where the money is ...

If you really want to solve the nursing shortage, pay RN's more money. But, of course, the hospitals don't want to do that because it would cut into their multi-million dollar profits. Hence the shortage claims.

But there really is no nursing shortage. Pay them and they will come. But if you don't want to pay then don't expect nurses to work for you either.

:typing

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Just so the news is not all bad-some of us newbies are fighters already and are willing to fight the good fight. Interesting, but I have already been talked to about my "attitude" I do not swear at people, or treat patients or coworkers like crap. Rather, they think that a new nurse doesn't have the right to call it like she sees it or to have an actual opinion on something. I'm also a firm believer that we, as nurses, should make this shortage work in our favor. Travel nursing, here I come!

I am glad that you are learning to fight back. But travel nursing and agencies are not the answer either. These agencies are taking about 2/3rds of your pay for their services to a hospital. Why should you ony get 1/3 of what an agency is being paid for you professional services as a nurse? Independant Contracting is the way nurses should go.

The problem with temping, travel nursing, and agencies, is that it does nothing but splinter the nursing professio even more than it is. There is no incentive to stay and improve the status quo. And there is alot of improving that is needed.

Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN

Spokane, Washington

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GadgetRN71 has 10 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Operating Room.

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I am glad that you are learning to fight back. But travel nursing and agencies are not the answer either. These agencies are taking about 2/3rds of your pay for their services to a hospital. Why should you ony get 1/3 of what an agency is being paid for you professional services as a nurse? Independant Contracting is the way nurses should go.

The problem with temping, travel nursing, and agencies, is that it does nothing but splinter the nursing professio even more than it is. There is no incentive to stay and improve the status quo. And there is alot of improving that is needed.

Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN

Spokane, Washington

How do nurses start the process of Independent Contracting? I would be all for this if I knew how it worked-I know traveling is not the ideal answer either. But it is so very tempting, especially when you start to realize that many other nurses are afraid(with good reason) to speak up. Me, I'm single and have no kids yet, so if I get fired, I just have myself to worry about. Others have little ones or elderly parents relying on them. Sigh...It is an ugly situation, and unfortunately, the hospitals have the nursing profession by the short and curlies.

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I have said it before and I will say it again. There is not enough time in the ADN program, and probably the Diploma programs, as well, to adequately prepare new grads for the realities of bedside nursing. And there is not enough time to arm them with the "survival skills", that will make their jobs more tolerable. There is not enough time, and we are not preparing "fighter" with the knowledge, and skills that they will need to survive the realities of working as a bedside nurse. The hospitals have their law firms, to be little us. What does the nursing profession have? Out state boards of nursing, the ANA?

In our haste to solve the "nursing shortage", we are allowing our profession to turn into a "revolving door" of inexperienced new grads. Schools are turing out thousands of new grads a year, only to have them leave within 4- 6 years in disgust. They may be able to accomplish the technical skills needed to be a nurse, but have none of the survival skills needed to survive, and fight back, with the laws that this country has not yet revoked, and watered down, due to pressure from the AHA, Nursing home industry, and the insurance companies.

The survival skills that are needed, but not taught, are Employment Law, Administrative Law, Insurance Law, Independant Contracting, Assertiveness Training, to name a few. Also, classes on starting a business, would give new grads the confidence to go out on their own, so they do not end up as "indentured servants, to their employer. In other words, nurses need to learn the skills that other health care professions have been learning for the last 25 years, to bring them away from the concept of having to work as an employee, and being a self employed medical professional. They added these classes, and increased their entry into practice when DRGs came into play and they had to validate their worth and presence at the patients' bedside. It also clarified their knowledge and contribution to patient outcomes, and care, from what is offered by lesser educated individuals.

We learned none of this in ADN programs, or Diploma program. We were too busy learning how to make beds, give meds, assessments, nursing skills, to learn how not to be bullied, harrassed, targeted, and what our rights were as employees. I am not knocking the stuff that is learned in school, but other professions made the choice to sacrifice technical skills, to learn what was needed under the new rules of health care. Internships were started after graduation to ease the transition from student to professional. It has only enhanced thier worth at the bedside, and their control of their profession.

Nurses, on the other hand, continued to make "daddy" happy, and continue to turn out more nurses every year, and only to watch them leave due to the intolerable working conditions, low pay, and benefits, and complete lack of respect for our profession.

There is just not enough time in a two year ADN program, or 2- 3 year diploma program to teach these needed skills. The lack of survival skills is adding to the nursing shortage by new grads, who see the powerlessness, and stress, of bedside nursing, and are leaving at even before the ink is dry on their diplomas.

Of course, this is exactly what the hospitals want. Nurses leaving early in their professional career don't cost the hospital for pensions, workmans comp, when they are injured on the job, and leave their higher salaries for a newer nurse, who can then be hired at several dollars an hour less.

If you don't believe me, just look outside the box, at the BIG PICTURE. I challenge ANYONE to tell me that I am wrong, and I am just an alarmist, and overreacting. I have been at the game called nursing, since 1975.

We are being disempowered, de skilled, deprofessionalized, and disenfranchised by the hospital industry, and WE have no plan, power, or ally to get us out of the hole we have dug ourselves.

Something needs to give, and nurses need to take control, accountablity, and responsibility, or we will not have a profession to fight for.

Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN

Spokane, Washigton

So very true. I vote for you, Lindarn, as the leader of our new national nurses' union.

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RNtigerEMT specializes in Cardiac, Med-Surg, now in ED.

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So very true. I vote for you, Lindarn, as the leader of our new national nurses' union.

Exactly my thoughts!!!!!!!! Go Lindarn!!!!!

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