Medication Aides - page 3

HI. I am new. I am a nursing student scheduled to graduate in May. My state is proposing legislation soon regarding Medication Aides. I am very leary of the wording of the proposal because it... Read More

  1. by   VickyRN
    Quote from caydon2
    I had no idea this was happening and I consider myself informed of political matters! How did you hear about this?
    This whole thing is underhanded beyond belief. North Carolina nursing faculty have access to excellent first-hand sources concerning important nursing and patient care political matters throughout the state.
  2. by   jsteine1
    Quote from VickyRN
    Yes, we did. This is the resurrection of NC Senate Bill 662 and NC House Bill 783, both of which were tabled in committee after 12 of the 14 members of the NC Board of Nursing voted to no longer support this very dangerous legislation, back in the May NCBON meeting. At that point, the executive director of the NCBON vowed to bring the medication aide back. It was tacked on to the very popular 2005 Appropriations Act (NC Senate Bill 622) as "back-door legislation," which apparently has passed. This is a very dark day for nursing in North Carolina.

    http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/Sessions...ML/S622v7.html


    Nothing short of terrifying. Does anyone know how many states alllow Medication aides?
  3. by   VickyRN
    Quote from jsteine1
    nothing short of terrifying. does anyone know how many states alllow medication aides?
    this article provides some insight: http://www.nursingworld.org/ojin/tpclg/leg_12.htm

    the whole concept of the medication aide is confusing, as there is no consensus as to what sort of training the medication aide should have, the work setting, and the types of medications. medication aides have been legal in north carolina for years, but only in assisted living environments. this new legislation is dangerous, in that these unlicensed personnel may now dispense medications in acute care facilities, nursing homes, prisons, psychiatric units, and schools. the big fear is that politicians and hospital executives will use the nursing shortage as an excuse to deskill and deprofessionalize nursing. this new frankenstein version of the medication aide is a prime example. the real motive is to save $$$$$$ - but at what cost??? who can place a dollar value on our frail elders' or children's safety? the public needs to know before it is too late.

    a few other links:

    http://www.alfa.org/public/articles/...management.pdf

    http://dhfs.wisconsin.gov/rl_dsl/nhs/medaides.htm

    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...01/ai_n9351456
  4. by   boulergirl
    I recently resigned from my med tech duties, just in time for the new company we work for to buy out our building. Anyway, the new company has four days' training for the new med techs (now they're "med aides") BUT they have so much responsibility that I cannot imagine being in their shoes. It was one thing to pass pills and be shift supervisor, but now the med aides are drowning in paperwork and don't even time to take a break anymore. (Now one med aide passes meds for the whole building--that's about 50 people--on each shift.) They have alert charting, skin care charting, progress notes, pharmacy orders, vital sign charting, etc., then there's the faxes they have to send to pharmacy, to the doctor asking about this or that resident's medication, oh and did I forget to mention that we're on a first-name basis on the guy who delivers our meds EVERY NIGHT? (and sometimes more than once a night). That new doctor must really love pumping our residents full of meds. Needless to say, the med aides are burning out and the raise they were promised four months ago has not happened, but the promised increase in workload and job stress, has. Now that the med aides are virtually working as staff nurses, they're beginning to wonder what our boss has to do.
  5. by   M&MRN2005
    Quote from jsteine1
    nothing short of terrifying. does anyone know how many states alllow medication aides?

    there are 14 states that currently allow medication aides. other states are trying to impose this type of legislation, but thanks to their nurses associations, the legislation was defeated. the ncna (north carolina nurses asssociation) was for this legislation along with the nc hospital association, as long as hospitals were not affected. gee thanks!! it is a sad day when associations agree with legislation "just because it doesn't affect them." the relief efforts for hurricane katrina victims really doesn't affect nc, but i hope that we are outraged at how the relief efforts have been handled. suppose we as american citizens sat back and did "nothing" just because it did not effect us. we live in a sad state of affairs when $$$ comes before people's health and safety.
  6. by   M&MRN2005
    Quote from boulergirl
    i recently resigned from my med tech duties, just in time for the new company we work for to buy out our building. anyway, the new company has four days' training for the new med techs (now they're "med aides") but they have so much responsibility that i cannot imagine being in their shoes. it was one thing to pass pills and be shift supervisor, but now the med aides are drowning in paperwork and don't even time to take a break anymore. (now one med aide passes meds for the whole building--that's about 50 people--on each shift.) they have alert charting, <a style='text-decoration: none; border-bottom: 3px double;' href="http://www.serverlogic3.com/lm/rtl3.asp?si=24&k=skin%20care" onmouseover="window.status='skin care'; return true;" onmouseout="window.status=''; return true;">skin care</a> charting, progress notes, pharmacy orders, vital sign charting, etc., then there's the faxes they have to send to pharmacy, to the doctor asking about this or that resident's medication, oh and did i forget to mention that we're on a first-name basis on the guy who delivers our meds every night? (and sometimes more than once a night). that new doctor must really love pumping our residents full of meds. needless to say, the med aides are burning out and the raise they were promised four months ago has not happened, but the promised increase in workload and job stress, has. now that the med aides are virtually working as staff nurses, they're beginning to wonder what our boss has to do.

    what type of facility did you work in? who is supervising these people? why are the med aides ordering medications for the patients. a med aides only responsibility is the task of giving the med to the patient. nothing more. if so, this is violation of nc state law!!!!
  7. by   boulergirl

    what type of facility did you work in? who is supervising these people? why are the med aides ordering medications for the patients. a med aides only responsibility is the task of giving the med to the patient. nothing more. if so, this is violation of nc state law!!!!
    this is an assisted-living facility i work in, but it's in georgia. the med aides don't order new meds for the residents--the doctor does. however, if a resident falls or has a uti or something, the med aide has to contact the doctor and ask them if the resident should be prescribed an antibiotic. i'm assuming that these orders have to be cleared with the facility nurse (our boss).

    these new guidelines, btw, are courtesy of the new company (which is based in oregon, thousands of miles away).
  8. by   M&MRN2005
    Quote from boulergirl
    This is an assisted-living facility I work in, but it's in Georgia. The med aides don't order new meds for the residents--the doctor does. However, if a resident falls or has a UTI or something, the med aide has to contact the doctor and ask them if the resident should be prescribed an antibiotic. I'm assuming that these orders have to be cleared with the facility nurse (our boss).

    These new guidelines, BTW, are courtesy of the new company (which is based in Oregon, thousands of miles away).
    For assisted living facilities, they use med techs and they fall under the federal guidelines which are different than the NC guidelines and the Medication Aides. There is a lot more training for med techs under the federal govt, than NC is proposing for med aides. Also the residents in assisted living facilties are mostly capable of taking care of themselves. They have the mental ability to know if a mediciation is incorrect.
  9. by   sunny78
    i live in n.c. and i started out as a cma and as far as the duties go for a cma,its really up to the dr's as to what you do and as to how far your responsibilties go, i know i done things that were beyond my duties as i am sure we all have at one job or another,so i can say the best learning tool for me was hands -on learning from dr's and other nurses at the time and i think that is the best experience,and also,i have found that dr's here would rather train someone the way they want things done as opposed to someone fresh out of school!! i have actually been turned down for a job because the dr felt i had too much experience! its weird but i would like to hear how other states work!
  10. by   Jane RCC
    Quote from M&MRN2005
    HI. I am new. I am a nursing student scheduled to graduate in May. My state is proposing legislation soon regarding Medication Aides. I am very leary of the wording of the proposal because it states that these aides are mandatory in non-healthcare facilities such as: daycares, prisons, schools, group homes, and long term care facilities. However, it is optional for other healthcare facilities such as acute care facilities. I know programs such as this has passed in over half of the states. Does anyone have any imput? How is it working? Has there been any problems? Are med errors increasing? It really bothers me because these people have no prior medical experience and will have 24 hours of training. The RN will delegate to them. This is real scary. This program came about in our state because these med aides were already working in some of these facilities and had no formal training. From what I understand, this is suppose to help alleviate the nursing shortage for our state. I am looking for help, please. I would love your imput and any suggestions.
    WE HAVE REASON TO BE MORE THAN A LITTLE ALARMED. I WORKED CONTRACT AT A FACILLITY FOR A SHORT TIME ( ASSISTED LIVING FACILLITY) THEY WERE IN MY OPINION FUNCTIONING AS NURSES. THERE WERE SOME ERRORS (INSULIN) THEY ARE NOT ALLOWED TO GIVE IM INJECTIONS. ONE OF THE PROBLEM I SAW AND THE SCARIEST, THEY WERE COMMUNICATING BY FAX RE MRS SO AND SO IS CONGESTED....MD ACTUALLY CALLED IN RX FOR THIS URI DX BY MED TECH... THE MD'S DO NOT KNOW WHO SENT FAX...ME THINKS THEY THINKS...THEY GOT FAX FROM RN..I DID NOT STAY LONG...WORKING ON MY LISCENSE AND I REALLY DON'T THINK A LITTLE IN HOUSE TRAINING IS STRUCTURED ENOUGH. ESP WHEN RN IS NOT THERE. THINK NC DOES NOT REQ RN ON STAFF( IN GROUP HOMES AND ASSISTED LIVING...MOST ARE CONTRACT:angryfire
  11. by   charebec65
    Quote from jsteine1
    Nothing short of terrifying. Does anyone know how many states alllow Medication aides?
    Ohio began a "trial" a few months ago only a certain facilities. I believe it is to last a year. It's my understanding that if we're in a facility that uses these aids, that we have no choice but to let them pass our meds......and if they screw up, it's our license:angryfire :angryfire .
  12. by   VickyRN
    Quote from charebec65
    Ohio began a "trial" a few months ago only a certain facilities. I believe it is to last a year. It's my understanding that if we're in a facility that uses these aids, that we have no choice but to let them pass our meds......and if they screw up, it's our license:angryfire :angryfire .
    We do have a choice in these circumstances, however difficult this may be. We can "vote with our feet." LEAVING an unsafe job is much better than losing one's license (and livelihood). If enough nurses boycott or refuse to work under such circumstances, then employers will be forced to relent.
  13. by   charebec65
    Quote from VickyRN
    We do have a choice in these circumstances, however difficult this may be. We can "vote with our feet." LEAVING an unsafe job is much better than losing one's license (and livelihood). If enough nurses boycott or refuse to work under such circumstances, then employers will be forced to relent.
    I would certainly be one to "vote with" my feet. First off, I won't go to work where there is a CMA trial going on. Furthermore, if Ohio does end up going with CMA's after this trial period, I'll avoid facilities utilizing them. I've only just graduated from a PN program and haven't taken my NCLEX. I also begin work on my RN this fall (beginning with a couple of non-nsg classes I need). The last thing I want is to jeopardize my license (once I do get it).

    What I don't understand is how they can force these essentially untrained aides on us and threaten our licenses for their mistakes. I will eventually be an RN but will work as an LPN in the meantime. There are differences in things we (RNs and LPNs) can do and there are reasons for those differences - namely the education.

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