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No, Caps Are Not Totally Gone

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You are reading page 7 of No, Caps Are Not Totally Gone. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

That's cool! I love the nurse's cap and if people want to wear it, go for it! I know someone who WANTS to wear her cap and her all-white uniform, but we aren't "allowed" where we work---I think that's a DISGRACE!!!

Well there is an "old school" train of thought that it is not wise for one nurse to appear dressed different than the others, on the grounds patients and others may assume she is the *only* nurse.

In the days when all nursing staff was in whites (cap optional), the above hardly made a difference, however if the entire floor is wearing navy blue scrub sets, and you show up wearing "starched whites" and a cap, and or just the cap, it does make you stand out.

The other thing that may concern your hospital is the risk of infection and or harm to either a patient or yourself from a cap, and in this lawsuit happy society, they as your employer may be on the hook.

What you may try doing is approaching nurse management about perhaps being allowed to wear a cap one day or week a year, say around Nurses Day.

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It really has been within the past twenty years or so that hospital nursing staff got permission to wear pantsuits (white of course), then even scrub top and pant sets. Prior to this it was dresses, skirts and all that went with them (hose, nylons, suspender belts, girdles, slips, petticoats....). As hospital nursing is practiced today, you really need freedom to move about easily, not to mention wearing a dress or skirt meant one could give a "show" if say you had to climb up or bend down, or worse get onto the floor (to plug something into an electrical outlet). Quite a few OR and L&D nurses didn't like having to get up on stool or such to adjust a lamp wearing a scrub dress when certain "peeping tom" type doctors were lurking about.

Leave us examine this example:barco.jpg

The first prolly would work for various shapes, but the other two one is going to have to start laying down plans at about 13 to pull it off! *LOL*

I have to disagree. I wear dresses and skirt uniforms probably 75% of the time. I have never flashed anyone climbing on a bed for a transfer or up on a stool to reach supplies.

It's called wearing the appropriate length. I even know of a few nurses that wear skorts/golf skirts. Looks like a wrap skirt from the front and knee length shorts from the back.

White hose is getting harder to find and it's not cheap. But it's support hose and the legs feel great after a shift.

We've had students on the units who have bought a scrub dress after seeing us work in them. It's really not difficult.

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Well there is an "old school" train of thought that it is not wise for one nurse to appear dressed different than the others, on the grounds patients and others may assume she is the *only* nurse.

In the days when all nursing staff was in whites (cap optional), the above hardly made a difference, however if the entire floor is wearing navy blue scrub sets, and you show up wearing "starched whites" and a cap, and or just the cap, it does make you stand out.

The other thing that may concern your hospital is the risk of infection and or harm to either a patient or yourself from a cap, and in this lawsuit happy society, they as your employer may be on the hook.

What you may try doing is approaching nurse management about perhaps being allowed to wear a cap one day or week a year, say around Nurses Day.

I'm kind of curious as to why you think the cap would carry a risk of infection any more than your hair would? Granted, most people wash their hair everyday, but not all, and germs on a dry hat aren't likely to survive from one shift to another. I think there is more risk of germs on your pen and stethoscope than there ever would be on a hat. Granted those things are easier to clean, but what about your shoes? Shoes get much dirtier than hats and have about as much, or more, likelihood of touching a patient in a way that would cause infection as a hat would.

I can see the "only nurse" argument, but not the risk of infection and a lawsuit. That might be stretching it a bit.

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I'm kind of curious as to why you think the cap would carry a risk of infection any more than your hair would? Granted, most people wash their hair everyday, but not all, and germs on a dry hat aren't likely to survive from one shift to another. I think there is more risk of germs on your pen and stethoscope than there ever would be on a hat. Granted those things are easier to clean, but what about your shoes? Shoes get much dirtier than hats and have about as much, or more, likelihood of touching a patient in a way that would cause infection as a hat would.

I can see the "only nurse" argument, but not the risk of infection and a lawsuit. That might be stretching it a bit.

Infection part of my posting came from the oft quoted rationale as to why caps (or at least one of the many reasons), were discarded; for the most part they were found to be grossly contaminated. I for one as you never understood how that equalled potential danger of infection for patients or anyone else. Suppose if one handled one's cap, then cared for a patient without hand washing...., Other than that there is the fact that whatever is on the cap, will eventually end up on one's head or at least hair, which again if touched or even fluffed about could spread "germs".

As for "lawsuits" I was referring to potential harm from someone being jabbed in the face, eye or some such with any of the more elaborate caps.

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i loved the idea of white baseball caps.

leslie

Me, too. And I want to be able to turn it either brim backwards, sideways or frontwards, depending on the occasion, yo.:cool:

To those who are talking about wearing their "whites", I do hope you mean the tailored whites of the past, even doctors wore a white garment tailored and drawn and buttoned across the chest ala Dr. Kildare (that's him down there for the youngsters) :redbeathe . . . but white scrubs ?? Five extra pounds and you might look like the Sta-Puft marshmallow man or woman! eek!

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I looked at the picture, wearing a cap and printed scrubs looked silly. If you are going to be traditional wear all white.

I only wore a cap in school, in the 1970's there was a feminism movement and the caps represented oppression. I could not wash my cap. It would fall off in places I would rather not mention. It would get caught on the curtains. Wearing the caps were uncomfortable.

I have not seen a cap worn in over 20 years. I hope nurses have moved past the idea that a cap makes us professional.

I wonder why other countries still were caps ? Are these progressive forward moving areas with advanced nursing practice that we should emulate ? If countries were caps are worn have good safety records, great nurse patient ratios, good salaries, and good working conditions, I would explore wearing a cap. Otherwise I would dismiss the idea.

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I wonder why other countries still were caps ? Are these progressive forward moving areas with advanced nursing practice that we should emulate ? If countries were caps are worn have good safety records, great nurse patient ratios, good salaries, and good working conditions, I would explore wearing a cap. Otherwise I would dismiss the idea.

Most other countries that I've encountered it is not the nurses but the student nurses who wear caps.

Many Japanese and Chinese hospitals, on the other hand, DO have the nurses wear caps in nonsurgical settings (I noted that the Japanese nurses prepping for surgery removed the cap and bundled the hair into a more sterile and commonly seen cap).

It is a traditional mindset. Yes, in those same hospitals the physicians also wear more traditional garb than one would find in US hospitals.

I think it is safe to say that Japan is definitely representative of a progressive healthcare environment.

Not to say that the US is, actually as a nation we fall short of practically all other industrialized nations...

But I digress...

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I agree with her statement regarding the general public--not being able to tell everyone apart, quite confusing for the patient and family. Often the patient will assume that the "nurse" is the aide if not informed verbally. How about we hang around our necks gaudy fat chains with our said school dangling from them. We could introduce ourselves by stating: "Whatsup homey?! I'll be your nurse, for real. You in pain? Want some drugs, Fool?"

OMG OMG OMG OMG - how HARD did this make me laugh....:lol2::lol2::lol2:

What did it for me was "Fool!"

Calla, why you trippin'?

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A friend who lives up the road from me is a dental hygienist (aka dental nurse in other parts of the world), and she informs me that when she was at school (1980's or 1970's not sure and didn't think to ask), she wore a cap, and there are pictures of dental nurses out there wearing caps.

Would have to say the "heyday" for caps and all and sundry wearing them was from the 1940's until 1970's or so, and that was the period I was referring to, though obviously nurses wore the things far earlier than that.

Did all hosptials have caps as part of their candy striper uniform? Probably not, but some did, would try to find more, but one has to "Google" through to many pages of naughty "uniform" adverts.

I remember seeing candy stripers with caps when I was a kid. They were usually white trimmed in the peppermint stripe fabric on the edge. And it seems to me I can remember dental hygienists in caps (for a very short while) - the picture sprung in my mind as soon as I read your post.

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ProgressiveThinking -- we wear pajamas to work. lol. I don't know that our current choice in uniform really instills much patient respect. At least not any more than the caps did. :lol2:

.

What loses respect for me is when the RN in question looks as though they SLEPT in the scrubs they have on. I used to iron my scrubs (I'm active duty Air Force now and I wear what's provided at the hospital because I have to) - took all of five minutes with a good steam iron and a quick spray of Niagra starch. Five minutes - literally.

I actually had patients and family members who'd comment on my scrubs, and a few even said that while I was one of many faces they'd seen (and all of the RNs on my floor were outstanding, BTW, so I never took it as a slight), they always remembered my scrubs. DOCTORS even noticed.

It makes a difference, folks - and it takes five minutes. There's absolutely no excuse for walking around in scrubs that obviously just left the dryer that morning after spending the entire night in it. BIG pet peeve of mine. We don't need caps to come back, we need to start treating scrubs as the uniform they are. If you worked for Bank of America you'd not last a day in a crapped up suit - why do people think it's OK to treat scrubs like PJs? Drives me to distraction.

(That's the GENERAL you, not a specific you...)

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museum075.jpg

Ok, put out some feelers and not a nibble. Not one single HB grad will part with their cap. Sorry.

Apparently the things are rare and highly sought after, one sold on eBay last December for nearly $50, and that was cheap. It also seems Hunter Bellevue grads, like Belleuve school nurses before them are rather touchy about who gets' their mitts on their school's cap.

IIRC, Hunter was one of the first CUNY nursing programs to cease capping as part of their graduation ceremony, so that could explain things.

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